Schlagwort-Archive: Mass Surveillance

Macron, May, Merkel – weakening encryption and making messengers (whatsapp) vulnerable leads to data security catastrophes

In weakening strong encryption by weakening software like Android or IOS operating System (subroutines, inlays, essentials) in order to enable mass surveillance you the leaders of Europe risk the data security of thousands of Europe companies. Is it worth it?

Even Microsoft is now warning that the government practice of “stockpiling” software vulnerabilities so that they can be used as weapons is a misguided tactic that weakens security for everybody.

“An equivalent scenario with conventional weapons would be the U.S. military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen,” the company said Sunday.

Why are you doing this? Hopefully not for the need to give information in order to receive from the USA?

epa05989737 French President Emmanuel Macron (L) talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) as US President Donald J. Trump (C) walks by, during a line up for the group photo at the NATO summit in Brussels, Belgium, 25 May 2017. NATO countries‘ heads of states and governments gather in Brussels for a one-day meeting. EPA/ARMANDO BABANI

You saw and recognised and understood WannaCry that affected thousands of companies throuout Europe?

The vulnerability in Windows that WannaCry takes advantage of was discovered by the NSA for its surveillance toolkit. But word got out when a hacker group known as the Shadow Brokers dumped a bunch of leaked NSA information onto the Internet in April. Microsoft, however, had already issued a software update the month before; those that downloaded and installed the patch were protected from WannaCry, but many others lagged behind and became victims.

Obama gives CIA, FBI, DEA and 13 other agencies warrantless full raw DATA NSA surveillance access on Americans citizens

Obama gives CIA, FBI, DEA and 13 other agencies warrantless full raw DATA NSA surveillance access on Americans citizens.

Further Reading:

In its final days, the Obama administration has expanded the power of the National Security Agency to share globally intercepted personal communications with the government’s 16 other intelligence agencies before applying privacy protections.

The change means that far more officials will be searching through raw data.

Previously, the N.S.A. filtered information before sharing intercepted communications with another agency, like the C.I.A. or the intelligence branches of the F.B.I. and the Drug Enforcement Administration. The N.S.A.’s analysts passed on only information they deemed pertinent, screening out the identities of innocent people and irrelevant personal information.

Now, other intelligence agencies will be able to search directly through raw repositories of communications intercepted by the N.S.A. and then apply such rules for “minimizing” privacy intrusions.

“Rather than dramatically expanding government access to so much personal data, we need much stronger rules to protect the privacy of Americans,” Mr. Toomey said. “Seventeen different government agencies shouldn’t be rooting through Americans’ emails with family members, friends and colleagues, all without ever obtaining a warrant.”

“This development is very troubling for Americans’ privacy,” said John Napier Tye, a former state department official turned surveillance whistleblower. “Most people don’t realize this, but even our purely domestic email and text messages are often stored on servers outside the United States. And the NSA has written extremely permissive rules for itself to collect data outside US borders.

“So in operations overseas, the NSA is scooping up a lot of purely domestic communications. And now, with these new rules, many different federal agencies can search and read the domestic communications of normal Americans, without any warrant or oversight from Congress or the courts.”

They mean that NSA officials are no longer required to filter out information about innocent people whose identities have been scooped up before passing the intercepted communications to officials from other agencies, who will now be able to search through raw caches of data.

“This raises serious concerns that agencies that have responsibilities such as prosecuting domestic crimes, regulating our financial policy, and enforcing our immigration laws will now have access to a wealth of personal information that could be misused,” said Singh Guliani. “Congress needs to take action to regulate and provide oversight over these activities.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/12/obama-us-intelligence-greater-access-warrantless-data-foreign-targets

Privacy advocates’ concerns center around loopholes in the rules that allow agencies like the FBI and DEA to search the NSA’s collected data for purposes such as investigating an “agent of a foreign power.” Any evidence of illegal behavior that a searcher stumbles on can be used in a criminal prosecution. That means the rule change, according to Cardozo, introduces new possibilities for law enforcement agencies like the DEA and FBI to carry out what’s known as “parallel construction.” That maneuver involves secretly using the NSA’s intelligence to identify or track a criminal suspect, and then fabricating a plausible trail of evidence to present to a court as an after-the-fact explanation of the investigation’s origin. The technique was the subject of an ACLU lawsuit against the Office of the Director of National Intelligence in 2012, and resulted in the Justice Department admitting to repeatedly using the technique to hide the NSA’s involvement in criminal investigations.

“It used to be that if NSA itself saw the evidence of a crime, they could give a tip to the FBI, and the FBI would engage in parallel construction,” says Cardozo. “Now FBI will be able to get into the raw data themselves and do what they will with it.”

https://www.wired.com/2017/01/just-time-trump-nsa-loosens-privacy-rules/

How NSA identifies you by just starting your windows PC

Thanks to the fine research paper found here http://www.icir.org/vern/papers/trackers-pets16.pdf  YOU ARE easiliy identified when you just start your windows PC and log onto the internet – not requiring you any user-inaction.

You are identified by either: HTTP Identifiers or NON-HTTP Identifiers

HTTP Identifiers

Application-specific: The first category is identifiers sent by applications other than browsers. For example, Skype sends a user identifier uhash in a URL of the format http://ui.skype.com/ui/2/2.1.0.81/ en/getlatestversion?ver=2.1.0.81&uhash= . The parameter uhash is a hash of the user ID, their password, and a salt, and remains constant for a given Skype user [12]. uhash can very well act as an identifier for a user; a monitor who observes the same value from two different clients/networks can infer that it reflects the same user on both. Another example in this category is a Dropbox user_id sent as a URL parameter. We discovered that since the Dropbox application regularly syncs with its server, it sends out this identifier—surprisingly, every minute—without requiring any user action.

Mobile devices: Our methodology enabled us to discover that the Apple weather app sends IMEI and IMSI numbers in POST requests to iphone-wu.apple.com. We can recognize these as such, because the parameter name in the context clearly names them as IMEI and IMSI; the value also matches the expected format for these identifiers. Other apps also send a number of device identifiers, such as phone make, advertising ID,4 SHA1 hashes of serial number, MAC address, and UDID (unique device identifier) across various domains, such as s.amazon-adsystem.com, jupiter.apads.com and ads.mp.mydas.mobi. The iOS and Android mobile SDKs provide access to these identifiers.

http-identifiers

NON-HTTP Identifiers

Device identifiers sent by iOS/OSX: We found instances of device identifiers sent on port 5223. Apple devices use this port to maintain a persistent connection with Apple’s Push Notification (APN) service, through which they receive push notifications for installed apps.

An app-provider sends to an APN server the push notification along with the device token of the recipient device. The APN server in turn forwards the notification to the device, identifiying it via the device token [2]. This device token is an opaque device identifier, which the APN service gives to the device when it first connects. The device sends this token (in clear text) to the APN server on every connection, and to each app-provider upon app installation. This identifier enabled us to identify 68 clients in our dataset as Apple devices. The devices sent their device token to a total of 407 IP addresses in two networks belonging to Apple (17.172.232/24, 17.149/16).

non-http-identifiers

The work http://www.icir.org/vern/papers/trackers-pets16.pdf was supported by the Intel Science and Technology Center for Secure Computing, the U.S. Army Research Office and by the National Science Foundation.

Copy of Publication here: trackers-pets16