Archiv für den Monat August 2018

Google needs to apologize for violating the trust of its users once again

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MAY 28: Google senior vice president of product Sundar Pichai delivers the keynote address during the 2015 Google I/O conference on May 28, 2015 in San Francisco, California. The annual Google I/O conference runs through May 29. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

  • An Associated Press investigation recently discovered that Google still collects its users‘ location data even if they have their Location History turned off.
  • After the report was published, Google quietly updated its help page to describe how location settings work.
  • Previously, the page said „with Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored.“
  • Now, the page says, „This setting does not affect other location services on your device,“ adding that „some location data may be saved as part of your activity on other services, like Search and Maps.“
  • The quiet changing of false information is a major violation of users‘ trust.
  • Google needs to do better.

Google this week acknowledged that it quietly tracks its users‘ locations, even if those people turn off their Location History — a clarification that came in the wake of an Associated Press investigation.

It’s a major violation of users‘ trust.

And yet, nothing is going to happen as a result of this episode.

It’s happened before

Google has a history of bending the rules:

  • In 2010, Google’s Street View cars were caught eavesdropping on people’s Wi-Fi connections.
  • In 2011, Google agreed to forfeit $500 million after a criminal investigation by the Justice Department found that Google illegally allowed advertisements from online Canadian pharmacies to sell their products in the US.
  • In 2012, Google circumvented the no-cookies policy on Apple’s Safari web browser and paid a $22.5 million fine to the Federal Trade Commission as a result.

Ultimately, Google came out of all of these incidents just fine. It paid some money here and there, and sat in a few courtrooms, but nothing really happened to the company’s bottom line. People continued using Google’s services.

Other companies have done it too

Remember Cambridge Analytica?

Five months ago in March, a 28-year-old named Christopher Wylie blew the whistle on his employer, the data-analytics company, Cambridge Analytica, at which he served as a director of research.

It was later revealed that Cambridge Analytica had collected the data of over 87 million Facebook users in an attempt to influence the 2016 presidential election in favor of the Republican candidate, Donald Trump.

One month later, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was summoned in front of Congress to answer questions related to the Cambridge Analytica scandal over a two-day span.

mark zuckerberg congress facebook awkwardFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, takes a drink of water while testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election.AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Many users felt like their trust was violated. A hashtag movement called „#DeleteFacebook“ was born.

And yet, nothing has really changed at Facebook since that scandal, which similarly involved the improper collection of user data, and the violation of users‘ trust.

Facebook seems to be doing just fine. During its Q2 earnings report in late July, Facebook reported over $13 billion in revenue — a 42% jump year-over-year — and an 11% increase in both daily and monthly active users.

In short, Facebook is not going anywhere. And neither is Google.

Too big — and too good — to fail

Just like Facebook has no equal among the hundreds of other social networks out there, the same goes for Google and competing search engines.

According to StatCounter, Google has a whopping 90% share of the global search engine market.

The next biggest search engine in the world is Microsoft’s Bing, which has a paltry 3% market share.

In other words, a cataclysmic event would have to occur for people to switch search engines. Or, another search engine would have to come along and completely unseat Google.

But that’s probably not going to happen.

GoogleUladzik Kryhin/Shutterstock

For almost 20 years now, Google dominated the search engine game. Its other services have become similarly prevalent: Gmail, and Google Docs, have all become integral parts of people’s personal and work lives. Of course, there are similar mail and productivity services out there, but using Google is far more convenient, since most people use more than one Google product, and having all of your applications talk to each other and share information is mighty convenient.

This isn’t meant to cry foul: Google is one of the top software makers in the world, but it has earned that status by constantly improving and iterating on its products, and even itself, over the past two decades. But one does wonder what event, if any, could possibly make people quit a service as big and convenient and powerful as Google once and for all.

The fact is: That probably won’t happen. People likely won’t quit Google’s services, unless there’s some major degradation of quality. But Google, as a leader in Silicon Valley, should strive to do better for its customers. Intentional or not, misleading customers about location data is a bad thing. Google failed its customers: It let users think they had more control when they did, and they only corrected their language about location data after a third-party investigation. But there was no public acknowledgement of an error, and no mea culpa.

Google owes its users a true apology. Quietly updating an online help page isn’t good enough.

 

http://uk.businessinsider.com/google-location-data-violates-user-trust-nothing-will-happen-2018-8?r=US&IR=T

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resting and vesting — showing up to Facebook and barely working to collect a $450 million payday

Jan Koum 5The WhatsApp cofounder Jan Koum.Reuters

  • Back in April, the WhatsApp cofounder Jan Koum announced plans to leave Facebook.
  • But he’s still showing up to the office once a month so he can continue to collect $450 million in Facebook stock he’s contractually due from when Facebook bought his company.
  • It’s a high-dollar example of „rest and vest,“ in which big tech companies pay senior employees who don’t do much work.
  • Koum has already sold over $7 billion in Facebook stock.

The WhatsApp cofounder Jan Koum said in April that he planned to leave Facebook, which bought his company for $19 billion in 2014. He’s already sold $7.1 billion worth of Facebook shares.

But he’s still showing up to the office, The Wall Street Journal reports, to collect one last payday: $450 million in stock.

Koum is resting and vesting, in Silicon Valley lingo, a state that often refers to wealthy entrepreneurs and engineers with one foot out the door at big tech companies who are allowed to continue to be officially employed until they’re able to collect stock and options in quarterly or annual increments.

Usually, stock awards after a merger are distributed on a four-year vesting cliff — if you last all four years, you get your entire stock grant. Koum’s last vesting date is November. He showed up at Facebook’s offices in mid-July, fulfilling a requirement of his employment contract, according to The Wall Street Journal.

„Resting and vesting“ is an open secret in Silicon Valley, Business Insider has reported. At some companies, the employees are called „coasters.“ The HBO show „Silicon Valley“ even spoofed it in an episode in which engineers hang out on a roof and don’t do any work.

„I’ve actually had a number of people, including today at Google X … send me pictures of themselves on a roof, kicking back doing nothing, with the hashtag ‚unassigned‘ or ‚rest and vest.‘ It’s something that really happens, and apparently, somewhat often,“ Josh Brener, the actor who plays the lucky character who got to rest and vest in HBO’s „Silicon Valley,“ told Business Insider last year.

From Business Insider’s report on the phenomenon:

„Facebook, for instance, has a fairly hush bonus program called ‚discretionary equity,‘ a former Facebook engineer who received it said.

„DE is when the company hands an engineer a massive, extra chunk of restricted stock units, worth tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars. It’s a thank-you for a job well done. It also helps keep the person from jumping ship because DE vests over time. These are bonus grants that are signed by top executives, sometimes even CEO Mark Zuckerberg.“

Koum’s payday isn’t related to discretionary equity; it’s instead a result of the over 20 million restricted shares of Facebook he received when he sold WhatsApp. He has one more vesting day in August and one in November, according to filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Koum reportedly decided to leave Facebook in the middle of a spat over how to integrate advertising into WhatsApp. A WhatsApp representative declined to comment, but The Journal reports that Koum is still employed at the social-networking giant.

When Koum left, he wrote that he was taking time off to collect „rare air-cooled Porsches“ and play ultimate Frisbee.

How many Porsches can one buy with $450 million?

 

http://uk.businessinsider.com/whatsapp-founder-jan-koum-rest-and-vest-for-450-million-facebook-stock-2018-8?r=US&IR=T

Google’s DeepMind AI can accurately detect 50 types of eye disease just by looking at scans

Mustafa Suleyman 1831_preview (1)DeepMind cofounder Mustafa Suleyman.DeepMind
  • Google’s artificial intelligence company DeepMind has published „really significant“ research showing its algorithm can identify around 50 eye diseases by looking at retinal eye scans.
  • DeepMind said its AI was as good as expert clinicians, and that it could help prevent people from losing their sight.
  • DeepMind has been criticised for its practices around medical data, but cofounder Mustafa Suleyman said all the information in this research project was anonymised.
  • The company plans to hand the technology over for free to NHS hospitals for five years, provided it passes the next phase of research.

Google’s artificial intelligence company, DeepMind, has developed an AI which can successfully detect more than 50 types of eye disease just by looking at 3D retinal scans.

DeepMind published on Monday the results of joint research with Moorfields Eye Hospital, a renowned centre for treating eye conditions in London, in Nature Medicine.

The company said its AI was as accurate as expert clinicians when it came to detecting diseases, such as diabetic eye disease and macular degeneration. It could also recommend the best course of action for patients and suggest which needed urgent care.

OCT scanA technician examines an OCT scan.DeepMind

What is especially significant about the research, according to DeepMind cofounder Mustafa Suleyman, is that the AI has a level of „explainability“ that could boost doctors‘ trust in its recommendations.

„It’s possible for the clinician to interpret what the algorithm is thinking,“ he told Business Insider. „[They can] look at the underlying segmentation.“

In other words, the AI looks less like a mysterious black box that’s spitting out results. It labels pixels on the eye scan that corresponds to signs of a particular disease, Suleyman explained, and can calculate its confidence in its own findings with a percentage score. „That’s really significant,“ he said.

DeepMind's algorithm analysing an OCT eye scanDeepMind’s AI analysing an OCT scan.DeepMind

Suleyman described the findings as a „research breakthrough“ and said the next step was to prove the AI works in a clinical setting. That, he said, would take a number of years. Once DeepMind is in a position to deploy its AI across NHS hospitals in the UK, it will provide the service for free for five years.

Patients are at risk of losing their sight because doctors can’t look at their eye scans in time

British eye specialists have been warning for years that patients are at risk of losing their sight because the NHS is overstretched, and because the UK has an ageing population.

Part of the reason DeepMind and Moorfields took up the research project was because clinicians are „overwhelmed“ by the demand for eye scans, Suleyman said.

„If you have a sight-threatening disease, you want treatment as soon as possible,“ he explained. „And unlike in A&E, where a staff nurse will talk to you and make an evaluation of how serious your condition is, then use that evaluation to decide how quickly you are seen. When an [eye] scan is submitted, there isn’t a triage of your scan according to its severity.“

OCT scanA patient having an OCT scan.DeepMind

Putting eye scans through the AI could speed the entire process up.

„In the future, I could envisage a person going into their local high street optician, and have an OCT scan done and this algorithm would identify those patients with sight-threatening disease at the very early stage of the condition,“ said Dr Pearse Keane, consultant ophthalmologist at Moorfields Eye Hospital.

DeepMind’s AI was trained on a database of almost 15,000 eye scans, stripped of any identifying information. DeepMind worked with clinicians to label areas of disease, then ran those labelled images through its system. Suleyman said the two-and-a-half project required „huge investment“ from DeepMind and involved 25 staffers, as well as the researchers from Moorfields.

People are still worried about a Google-linked company having access to medical data

Google acquired DeepMind in 2014 for £400 million ($509 million), and the British AI company is probably most famous for AlphaGo, its algorithm that beat the world champion at the strategy game Go.

While DeepMind has remained UK-based and independent from Google, the relationship has attracted scrutiny. The main question is whether Google, a private US company, should have access to the sensitive medical data required for DeepMind’s health arm.

DeepMind was criticised in 2016 for failing to disclose its access to historical medical data during a project with Royal Free Hospital. Suleyman said the eye scans processed by DeepMind were „completely anonymised.“

„You can’t identify whose scans it was. We’re in quite a different regime, this is very much research, and we’re a number of years from being able to deploy in practice,“ he said.

Suleyman added: „How this has the potential to have transform the NHS is very clear. We’ve been very conscious that this will be a model that’s published, and available to others to implement.

„The labelled dataset is available to other researchers. So this is very much an open and collaborative relationship between equals that we’ve worked hard to foster. I’m proud of that work.“

 

https://www.businessinsider.de/google-deepmind-ai-detects-eye-disease-2018-8?r=US&IR=T