Important cybersecurity terms even your non-tech employees need to know

Cyberattacks continue to grow in scale, ferocity, and audacity. No one is safe. Large corporations are a target because hackers see the potential payoff as huge. Small companies are vulnerable too because they don’t have the financial muscle needed to invest in sophisticated security systems. Now more than ever, businesses must do whatever it takes to keep their data and tech infrastructure safe. If non-techie employees understand key cybersecurity terms, they’ll have a much better chance of making the right security decisions. There are thousands of cybersecurity terms but no one (techie or otherwise) is under obligation to know all of them. Some terms are, however, more important than others and these are the ones all staff must be aware of.

Note that knowing these cybersecurity terms is more than just mastering the definitions. Rather, it’s being able to understand the patterns and behavior that define them.

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1. Adware

Adware is a set of programs installed without explicit user authorization that seek to inundate the user with ads. The primary aim of adware is to redirect search requests and URL clicks to advertising websites and data collection portals.

While adware mainly aims to advertise a product and monitor user browsing activity, it also slows down browsing speed, page-load speed, device performance, eats into metered data, and may even download malicious applications in the background.

2. Botnet

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Botnets are simply a collection of several (and they can number in the millions) Internet-enabled devices such as computers, smartphones, servers, routers, and IoT devices that are under a central command and control.

Botnets are infectious and can be propagated across multiple devices. Botnet is a portmanteau of “robot” and “network.” Some of the largest and most dramatic cyberattacks in recent times have involved botnets, including the destructive Mirai malware that infected IoT devices.

3. Cyber-espionage

When you hear the term espionage, what first comes to mind is the world in a bygone era. But espionage is as alive today as it was a century ago. The difference is that thanks to the proliferation of information technology and the ubiquity of the Internet, espionage can now be executed electronically and remotely.

Cyber-espionage is the gathering of confidential information online via illegal and unauthorized means. As you’d expect, the primary target of cyber-espionage is governments as well as large corporations. China has been in the news in this regard though other world powers such as the United States and Russia have been accused of doing the same at some point.

cybersecurity terms

4. Defense-in-depth

Defense-in-depth is a cybersecurity strategy that involves creating multiple layers of protection in order to protect the organization and its assets from attack. It’s born out of a realization that even with the best and most sophisticated technical controls, no security is ever 100 percent impenetrable.

With defense-in-depth, if one security control fails to prevent unauthorized access, the intruder will run into a new barrier. It’s unlikely that many hackers will have the knowledge and skills to surmount these multiple barriers.

5. End-to-end encryption

End-to-end encryption is a means of securing and protecting data that prevents unauthorized third parties from accessing it during rest or transmission. For instance, when you shop online and pay with your credit card, your computer or smartphone has to relay the credit card number you provide to the merchant for authentication and payment processing.

If your card details fall into the wrong hands, someone could use it to make purchases without your permission. By encrypting the data during transmission, you make it harder for third parties to access your confidential information.

6. Firewalls

A firewall is a defense mechanism that is meant to keep the bad guys from penetrating your network. It’s a virtual wall that protects servers and workstations from internal and external attack. It keeps tabs on access requests, user activity, and network traffic patterns in order to determine who can and cannot be allowed to interact with the network.

7. Hashing

Hashing is an algorithm for encrypting passwords from plain text into random strings of characters. It’s a form of security method that transforms fixed-length character strings into a shorter value that represents it. That way, if an intruder somehow got through to the password file or table, whatever they see will be text that is useless to them.

8. Identity theft

Identity theft is sometimes referred to as identity fraud. It’s the No. 1 reason why hackers seek to access confidential information and customer data especially from an organization. An identity thief hopes impersonate an individual by presenting the individual’s confidential records or authentication information as their own.

For example, an identity thief could steal credit card numbers, addresses, and email addresses then use that to fraudulently transact online, file for Social Security benefits, or submit an insurance claim.

9. Intrusion detection system (IDS)

It’s relatively uncommon for a cyberattack to be completely unprecedented or unknown in its form, pattern, and logic. From viruses to brute force attack, there are certain indicators that point to unusual activity. In addition, once your network is up and running, all network traffic and server activity will follow a relatively predictable pattern.

An IDS seeks to keep tabs on network traffic by quickly detecting malicious, suspicious, or anomalous activity before too much damage is done. The IDS blocks malicious traffic and sends an alert to the network administrator.

10. IP spoofing

IP address forgery or spoofing is an address-hijacking mechanism in which a third party pretends to be a trusted IP address in order to mimic a legitimate user’s identity, hijack an Internet browser, or otherwise gain access to a restricted network. It isn’t illegal for one to spoof an IP address. Some people do so in order to conceal their online activity and maintain anonymity (using tools such as Tor).

But IP spoofing is more often associated with illegal or malicious activity. So organizations should exercise caution and take appropriate precautions whenever they detect that a third party wants to connect to their network using a spoofed address.

11. Keylogger

Keylogger is short for keystroke logger. It’s a program that maintains a record of the keystrokes on your keyboard. The keylogger saves the log in a file, then encrypts and distributes it. While a keylogging algorithm can be used for good (some text-to-voice apps for example use keylogging mechanism to capture and translate user activity) keyloggers are often a form of malware.

A keylogger in the hands of nefarious persons is a destructive tool and is perhaps the most powerful weapon of infiltration a hacker can have. Remember, the keylogger will capture all key information such as user names, passwords, PINs, pattern locks, and financial information. With this data, the hacker can easily access your systems without breaking a sweat.

12. Malware

Malware is one of the cybersecurity terms you will hear the most often. It’s a catch-all word that describes all malicious programs including viruses, Trojans, spyware, adware, ransomware, and keyloggers. It’s any program that takes over some or all of the computing functions of a target computer for ill intent. Some malware is just little more than a nuisance but in many cases, malware is part of a wider hacking and data extraction scheme

13. Password sniffing

cybersecurity terms

Password sniffing is the process of intercepting and reading through the transmission of a data packet that includes one or more passwords. Given the volume of network traffic relayed per second, password sniffing is most effectively done by an application referred to as a password sniffer. The sniffer captures and stores the password string for malicious and illegal purposes.

14. Pharming

Pharming is the malicious redirection of a user to a fraudulent site that has colors, design, and features that look very similar to the original legitimate website. A user will unsuspectingly key in their data into the fake website’s input forms only to realize days, weeks, or months later that the site they gave their information to was harvesting their data to commit fraud.

15. Phishing

Phishing is a form of social engineering and the most common type of cyberattack. Every day, more than 100 billion phishing emails are sent out globally. Phishing emails purport to originate from a credible recognizable sender such as e-Bay or Amazon or financial institutions. The email will trick the recipient into sharing their username and password on what they believe is a legitimate website but is in reality a website maintained by cyberattackers.

Knowing these cybersecurity terms is a first step in preventing cyberattacks

While technical controls are crucial, employees are the weakest link in your security architecture. Nothing makes employees better prepared for a cyberattack than security training and awareness. For most organizations, the IT department represents only a fraction of the entire workforce.

Tech staff can therefore not be everywhere to explain cybersecurity terms and help each employee make security-conscious decisions. Therefore, making sure your non-techie staff is familiar with these cybersecurity terms is fundamental.

http://techgenix.com/15-cybersecurity-terms/

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Beapy uses NSA’s DoublePulsar EternalBlue & Mimikatz to collect and use passwords to mine for cryptocurrency following Coinhive

Two years after highly classified exploits built by the National Security Agency were stolen and published, hackers are still using the tools for nefarious reasons.

Security researchers at Symantec say they’ve seen a recent spike in a new malware, dubbed Beapy, which uses the leaked hacking tools to spread like wildfire across corporate networks to enslave computers into running mining code to generate cryptocurrency.

Beapy was first spotted in January but rocketed to more than 12,000 unique infections across 732 organizations since March, said Alan Neville, Symantec’s lead researcher on Beapy, in an email to TechCrunch. The malware almost exclusively targets enterprises, host to large numbers of computers, which when infected with cryptocurrency mining malware can generate sizable sums of money.

The malware relies on someone in the company opening a malicious email. Once opened, the malware drops the NSA-developed DoublePulsar malware to create a persistent backdoor on the infected computer, and uses the NSA’s EternalBlue exploit to spread laterally throughout the network. These are the same exploits that helped spread the WannaCry ransomware in 2017. Once the computers on the network are backdoored, the Beapy malware is pulled from the hacker’s command and control server to infect each computer with the mining software.

Not only does Beapy use the NSA’s exploits to spread, it also uses Mimikatz, an open-source credential stealer, to collect and use passwords from infected computers to navigate its way across the network.

According to the researchers, more than 80 percent of Beapy’s infections are in China.

Hijacking computers to mine for cryptocurrency — known as cryptojacking — has been on the decline in recent months, partially following the shutdown of Coinhive, a popular mining tool. Hackers are finding the rewards fluctuate greatly depending on the value of the cryptocurrency. But cryptojacking remains a more stable source of revenue than the hit-and-miss results of ransomware.

In September, some 919,000 computers were vulnerable to EternalBlue attacks — many of which were exploited for mining cryptocurrency. Today, that figure has risen to more than a million.

Typically cryptojackers exploit vulnerabilities in websites, which, when opened on a user’s browser, uses the computer’s processing power to generate cryptocurrency. But file-based cryptojacking is far more efficient and faster, allowing the hackers to make more money.

In a single month, file-based mining can generate up to $750,000, Symantec researchers estimate, compared to just $30,000 from a browser-based mining operation.

Cryptojacking might seem like a victimless crime — no data is stolen and files aren’t encrypted, but Symantec says the mining campaigns can slow down computers and cause device degradation.

A new cryptocurrency mining malware uses leaked NSA exploits to spread across enterprise networks

Sensorvault Googles Location Database – using cellphone users’ locations into a digital dragnet for law enforcement

The warrants, which draw on an enormous Google database employees call Sensorvault, turn the business of tracking cellphone users’ locations into a digital dragnet for law enforcement. In an era of ubiquitous data gathering by tech companies, it is just the latest example of how personal information — where you go, who your friends are, what you read, eat and watch, and when you do it — is being used for purposes many people never expected. As privacy concerns have mounted among consumers, policymakers and regulators, tech companies have come under intensifying scrutiny over their data collection practices.

The Arizona case demonstrates the promise and perils of the new investigative technique, whose use has risen sharply in the past six months, according to Google employees familiar with the requests. It can help solve crimes. But it can also snare innocent people.

https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/tracking-phones-google-is-a-dragnet-for-the-police/

Facebook it’s Hell Inside. Facebook Scandals. Backstabbing. Resignations. Record profits. Time Bombs. In early 2018, Mark Zuckerberg set out to fix Facebook.

The confusing rollout of meaningful social interactions—marked by internal dissent, blistering external criticism, genuine efforts at reform, and foolish mistakes—set the stage for Facebook’s 2018. This is the story of that annus horribilis, based on interviews with 65 current and former employees. It’s ultimately a story about the biggest shifts ever to take place inside the world’s biggest social network. But it’s also about a company trapped by its own pathologies and, perversely, by the inexorable logic of its own recipe for success.

Facebook’s powerful network effects have kept advertisers from fleeing, and overall user numbers remain healthy if you include people on Insta­gram, which Facebook owns. But the company’s original culture and mission kept creating a set of brutal debts that came due with regularity over the past 16 months. The company floundered, dissembled, and apologized. Even when it told the truth, people didn’t believe it. Critics appeared on all sides, demanding changes that ranged from the essential to the contradictory to the impossible. As crises multiplied and diverged, even the company’s own solutions began to cannibalize each other. And the most crucial episode in this story—the crisis that cut the deepest—began not long after Davos, when some reporters from The New York Times, The Guardian, and Britain’s Channel 4 News came calling. They’d learned some troubling things about a shady British company called Cambridge Analytica, and they had some questions.

15 Months of Fresh Hell Inside Facebook

Scandals. Backstabbing. Resignations. Record profits. Time Bombs. In early 2018, Mark Zuckerberg set out to fix Facebook. Here’s how that turned out:

https://www.wired.com/story/facebook-mark-zuckerberg-15-months-of-fresh-hell/

Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level

 

 

Excerpted from Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level

 

They knew that they had to respond immediately. The writ would dominate the next day’s news, and Apple had to have a response. “Tim knew that this was a massive decision on his part,” Sewell said. It was a big moment, “a bet-the-company kind of decision.” Cook and the team stayed up all night—a straight 16 hours—working on their response. Cook already knew his position—Apple would refuse—but he wanted to know all the angles: What was Apple’s legal position? What was its legal obligation? Was this the right response? How should it sound? How should it read? What was the right tone?

iOS 8 added much stronger encryption than had been seen before in smartphones. It encrypted all the user’s data—phone call records, messages, photos, contacts, and so on—with the user’s passcode. The encryption was so strong, not even Apple could break it. Security on earlier devices was much weaker, and there were various ways to break into them, but Apple could no longer access locked devices running iOS 8, even if law enforcement had a valid warrant. “Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” the company wrote on its website. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”

The War Room

For the next two months, the executive floor at One Infinite Loop turned into a 24/7 situation room, with staffers sending out messages and responding to journalists’ queries. One PR rep said that they were sometimes sending out multiple updates a day with up to 700 journalists cc’d on the emails. This is in stark contrast to Apple’s usual PR strategy, which consists of occasional press releases and routinely ignoring reporters’ calls and emails.

Cook also felt he had to rally the troops, to keep morale high at a time when the company was under attack. In an email to Apple employees, titled “Thank you for your support,” he wrote, “This case is about much more than a single phone or a single investigation.” He continued, “At stake is the data security of hundreds of millions of law-abiding people and setting a dangerous precedent that threatens everyone’s civil liberties.” It worked. Apple employees trusted their leader to make the decision that was right not only for them but also for the general public.

Cook was very concerned about how Apple would be perceived throughout this media firestorm. He wanted very much to use it as an opportunity to educate the public about personal security, privacy, and encryption. “I think a lot of reporters saw a new version, a new face of Apple,” said the PR person, who asked to remain anonymous. “And it was Tim’s decision to act in this fashion. Very different from what we have done in the past. We were sometimes sending out emails to reporters three times a day on keeping them updated.”

Outside Apple’s walls, Cook went on a charm offensive. Eight days after publishing his privacy letter, he sat down for a prime-time interview with ABC News. Sitting in his office at One Infinite Loop, he sincerely explained Apple’s position. It was the “most important [interview] he’s given as Apple’s CEO,” said the Washington Post. “Cook responded to questions with a raw conviction that was even more emphatic than usual,” wrote the paper. “He used sharp and soaring language, calling the request the ‘software equivalent of cancer’ and talking about ‘fundamental’ civil liberties.

https://www.wired.com/story/the-time-tim-cook-stood-his-ground-against-fbi/

What gaming will look like in 10 years

What gaming will look like in a year or two, let alone 10, is a matter of some debate. Battle-royale games have reshaped multiplayer experiences; augmented reality marries the fantastic and real in unprecedented ways. Google is leading a charge away from traditional consoles by launching a cloud-gaming service, Stadia, later this year. Microsoft’s next version of the Xbox will presumably integrate cloud gaming as well to allow people to play Xbox games on multiple devices. Sony’s plans in this regard are still unclear—it’s one of the many things Cerny is keeping mum on, saying only that “we are cloud-gaming pioneers, and our vision should become clear as we head toward launch”—but it’s hard to think there won’t be more news coming on that front.

For now, there’s the living room. It’s where the PlayStation has sat through four generations—and will continue to sit at least one generation more.

https://www.wired.com/story/exclusive-sony-next-gen-console/

Apple to Launch Iphone 2019 Edition with 5G option

Key Points
  • Apple and Qualcomm surprisingly settled their legal dispute over chip patent payments Tuesday.
  • Meanwhile, Intel, which has been providing modems for iPhones instead of Qualcomm, announced it would abandon its plans to make 5G modems.
  • The moves on Tuesday show Apple had limited options to get to a 5G iPhone, and none of them were ideal.

Here’s the good news for Apple.

Its surprise settlement with Qualcomm on Tuesday over a yearslong patent spat means it’s now in a position to keep pace with its competitors to bring a 5G-ready iPhone to market as soon as this year.

But even though Apple may win by getting a 5G iPhone to customers sooner than most people anticipated, it lost by settling with a company it loathes. Getting the iPhone to 5G means Apple was put in a sticky situation where it had to weigh four less-than-ideal options to make it all a reality.

In the end, Apple had to choose the lesser of all evils:

Option one: Settle with Qualcomm, the leader in 5G chips. Qualcomm’s 5G chips are already shipping in some devices today, with more expected as the year rolls on.

But Apple has seen Qualcomm’s business model as detrimental to the entire industry since it uses its dominant position to squeeze large fees out of each company that uses its chips and patents. Hence that nasty lawsuit. Apple CEO Tim Cook made his disdain for Qualcomm’s practices known in a January interview with CNBC’s Jim Cramer, and even blasted Qualcomm’s decision to hire a PR firm to write fake news stories about Apple, which Business Insider reported.

Option two: Wait for Intel to catch up in 5G. Even before Intel announced Tuesday night that it would abandon its plans to make 5G modems, there was speculation that the company was running behind to deliver the chips on time. Apple has been exclusively using Intel’s 4G modems in its latest iPhones as its dispute with Qualcomm raged on. If that dispute continued, a 5G iPhone might not have been possible until 2020 or even 2021.

Option three: Choose Huawei. In an interview that ran on CNBC this week, Huawei’s CEO said the company was „open“ to talks with Apple about bringing its 5G chips to the iPhone. But a partnership with Huawei would’ve looked bad for Apple, given the stink of political and security concerns around the company. (Huawei’s CEO has denied spying allegations.)

Option four: Apple could make its own 5G chips. Apple is thought to be working on its own modems after opening an office in San Diego, Qualcomm’s hometown, and posting job listings for modem chip designers. But it would likely take Apple several years to develop its own 5G chip, putting it several years behind its rivals.

None of those options were ideal for Apple. It could’ve waited an extra year or two for Intel to get its 5G chips up to snuff. It could’ve waited several more years to develop a 5G chip of its own as competitors like Google and Samsung push out their 5G devices and market themselves as more innovative than Apple. It could’ve worked with Huawei, a company that still can’t sell products in the U.S. over security concerns.

Or it could’ve ended its dispute with Qualcomm, even if Cook is allergic to its business practices. Unfortunately for Apple, Qualcomm was the best bet.

Tuesday’s settlement could result in a 5G iPhone as soon as this fall, when Apple is expected to release its next iPhone. (For what it’s worth, timing on a 5G iPhone is still unclear. Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf said in an interview Wednesday on CNBC’s „Squawk Box “ that he couldn’t comment on Apple’s product plans that include Qualcomm chips.)

Qualcomm gets to take a victory lap this week. Its lead in 5G forced a settlement with Apple and added a massive boost to its stock. Qualcomm shares was up 12% Wednesday, adding to its 23% gain Tuesday. Intel was up about 4%. Apple was up just 1%.

The market agrees. Apple was the loser in this fight.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/17/5g-why-apple-had-to-settle-its-dispute-with-qualcomm.html