Schlagwort-Archive: AI

Google built its own computer chip specifically for running deep neural networks, called the Tensor Processing Unit, or TPU

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What will the car of the future look like?

Technological breakthroughs such as autonomy are giving free rein on car design, so we’ve asked leading designers what the car of the future might look like

Autonomy, digitalisation, electrification and connected cars are no longer fashionable buzzwords looking to a brighter future.

Today, aspects of all three are already present on our roads, from cruise control functions that read the road ahead and adjust your speed, through to the self-driving Tesla Autopilot and Mercedes Driver Assist functions that are already on stream.

These are technological breakthroughs with far-reaching consequences; they are the result of the march of time and advances in understanding, and they are statesponsored because of the promise of fewer road injuries and accidents. They are an inevitability that will, in the words of Mercedes CEO Dieter Zetsche, prompt a profound change to cars “as radical as the industry has seen in its 120 years of existence”.

At the heart of this pivotal moment in time stands a generation of car designers with an entirely new rule book at their fingertips. But what does that rule book look like and how radically different is it?

Autocar polled leading designers from around the automotive industry to hear their views.

MICHAEL MAUER, Volkswagen Group head of design, on whether cars will end up looking the same:

“The mobility world of tomorrow gives us designers entirely new creative possibilities. Electric drives and autonomous driving remove any obstacles and change design more radically than has been the case in recent decades.

“But that does not mean we will have uniform autonomous vehicles. The streetscape of the future will become even more varied, even more colourful, even more emotional.”

SATORU TAI, executive design director for Nissan, on changing priorities and the short and longterm challenges:

“Cars may go through a phase of looking similar, but in the long run I think further advancement of technologies will then enable us to have more freedom in shaping unique designs, just as they did in the past.

“With the complete change of powertrains, the layout will become more flexible. We will no longer need an extended bonnet or bootlid. If we only pursue efficiency, I think the overall design of cars will become boxier and mono-volume orientated.

“Since many of the upcoming technologies are about man/machine interfaces, there will be a transition period and I am sure interior design will have more significance than exterior design. To a degree, the interior will influence the exterior design all the more and they will, eventually, resume the relationship they have today.”

GORDEN WAGENER, head of design at Mercedes-Benz, on bringing simplicity to complex solutions:

“Look at how much design has changed this company in the past three years. We’ve made the transition from an old luxury company to a modern luxury company, simply through design. Looking to the future with the challenges to come — digitisation, electrification — I think designers are the people to envision it.

“We’re living in the future; we’re five, 10, even 15 years into the future. Design has never been more important. There’s so much happening and, as designers, we’re really in the driver’s seat here. The new world will become very complex and it’s the designers who will try to make it simple.”

KLAUS BISCHOFF, Volkswagen design chief, on a focus on interiors:

“The biggest shift for design will be the interiors of EVs. Because we have pushed the ID concept’s climate control system into the nose, the dash can be pushed back 20cm — which gives a great deal more room in the cabin. Today’s car interiors are close to the driver, almost hemming them in; in future EVS, space in the cabin will be far greater.”

LAURENS VAN DEN ACKER, design chief for Renault, on whether to go radical or remain conventional:

“The first thing to say is that there’s never been a better time to be a designer. Technology means engineers can do things they couldn’t five years ago and that has opened up all sorts of avenues. Marketeers have realised that in a world of no really bad cars, design is what makes the difference.

“We can write our own future — and I don’t see car sharing taking that away. People will still care what their car looks like. People won’t want to be in a vehicle that looks like a trash can, and besides, most people won’t want to share a car. It’s something personal; it would be like sharing your cat.

“The biggest opportunity in the near future will be space; an electric drivetrain is 40% more compact than a combustion one, so that’s an opportunity. But how far do we go? I’m in favour of change but think customers will still want to see classic proportions. I don’t see a reason for revolution.”

SIMON HUMPHRIES, president of ED2, Toyota’s design HQ in Europe and one of the key development centres for Lexus and Toyota, on why there’s no single answer:

“Consumers’ values will become increasingly diverse, and consumers will become increasingly confident in their ability to choose without following mainstream trends. Acceptance of new, radical design and non-traditional hierarchies will result, and that may signal the end of mass trends in design as people seek new methods of self-expression.

“Size will no longer define the automotive hierarchy and branding strategies will have to change. The paradigm shift from gasoline to electric will not happen overnight; they will co-exist, resulting in each finding its own speciality. Choice will depend on lifestyle and the ‘allrounder’ car of today will be replaced by more specific designs, with the different experiences being offered becoming the brand differentiator.

“There will also be new influences from developing regions, leading to new concepts and ideas based on criteria other than the traditional European view of the car.”

MORAY CALLUM, vice-president of design at Ford, on how the designer’s job is changing:

“There’s more design to do because it’s more complicated. So much more goes into everything. When I started we chose between a 5.0in round headlight or a 7.0in headlight. Now we’ve got around 35 people on headlights, because there are around 50 different parts.

“We’re not just going to the car design schools to recruit now, because our role is getting wider as our relationship with the car is changing. As designers, we have an expanding role around how these systems we add work. For instance, the designer’s job is to make the [infotainment] logic logical to customers; we’ve got more interior designers than exterior designers now. You fall in love with the exterior but live with the interior — and most of the pain points are inside.”

ALFONSO ALBAISA, corporate vice-president and executive design director for Infiniti, on changing limits and how to persuade customers to embrace that change:

“I don’t feel there is a limit to designing cars for the future. The only issue is how we walk with our customer into the future, because the customer’s appetite for change is what we must relate to. Sometimes, depending on culture, the customer can be slightly conservative. This also depends on their social situation, but sometimes they are ambitious and expect significant design changes.

“I think premium customers are open to change if we provide a clear benefit to them. It’s important; if you change something significant, there must be very clear customer benefit. If there is not, the customer will reject it because they have so many good choices in the marketplace.

“In reality, the modern user experience and how it relates to and works with the owner has a much higher value than piping or wood on an interior, and I feel there is a great potential in the coming digital technologies.”

ROB MELVILLE, McLaren chief designer, on whether driver-focused supercars are less likely to change than conventional cars:

“They’ll change too — and soon. Our philosophy is to create breathtaking designs that tell the visual story of their function, and we have an amazing bandwidth of functionality and focus coming in our products. We plan to do this by using our advanced technologies, aerodynamic software and manufacturing processes to create our beautiful yet functional designs. We will continue to be brave and innovate.

“Clever design will be the dominant force and will always predominate over new legislation, which is an opportunity to find new solutions and make cars even more individual. It’s an exciting challenge for the team. The freeing up of crash structures will mean improved aerodynamics, which is fantastic, and the interior space/ volume of the car will be designed to suit our vehicle’s requirements.

“Customers will accept the changes as long as it is authentic, radical design. Radical design just to be trendy lacks integrity and this turns customers off. Our customers are very sophisticated and appreciate radical design that delivers improved experience, usability and fun. It has to put a smile on your face.”

STEFAN SIELAFF, Bentley director of design, on ultra-luxury design — and a history lesson:

“Maybe ‘transport boxes’ will be part of the future, but it will go one step at a time and I can say our customers want our cars because they make a statement, not just because they do a job.

“Bentley will always follow a fusion of performance and luxury; dynamics must be part of the mixture. But even if sometimes you will want to turn the seats around and leave the control to the systems, sometimes, at the right times, our customers will want to drive. It’s a compromise we know at Bentley; for 100 years our owners have done the same, albeit with chauffeurs driving.

“The question is not just about design but also technology. How will that change what we want from the interior space? And even if we give people more space, it won’t be about just opening the car up. Our customers want architecture, not just space.

“I am old enough to remember East and West Germany. In the East there was basically one car, a Trabant, available in five colours. The day the Berlin Wall came down, people were clamouring to change. That history lesson suggests there is no desire to own cars that look identical.”

http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry/what-will-car-future-look

Machines are becoming smarter marketers

artificial-intelligence-930x620

Marketing is only helpful when it’s meeting a need. It sounds simple, but those needs can be really tough to parse. Like any consumer, my needs evolve every day, if not every minute. I won’t stand for poorly targeted ads or messages that are irrelevant to me.

I work in marketing technology, and this industry has been talking about data-driven personalization for years. We’ve made a lot of progress, but we’re only just beginning to realize the potential of machine learning to match goods and services with a particular person in a specific situation.

Machines are changing how marketing is done. I’m not just talking about workflow automation or customer service bots. I’m talking about software that can help brands understand, meet, and even predict the subtlest of consumer needs.

It’s a new phase that I think of as Marketing 3.0. The 1.0 version, marketing in its early 20th century form, involved selling products to people who had demonstrated a need. The 1950s saw the rise of Marketing 2.0: ad men who shaped consumer desires to sell products. Machine learning allows marketers to move beyond this model and return to the original purpose of marketing, while adding speed and scale.

Marketing 1.0: Meeting needs as expressed
Marketing 2.0: Creating needs, then meeting them
Marketing 3.0: Machines analyzing needs, then meeting them

Marketing 3.0 uses machine learning to match product and consumer faster, more precisely, and in the right context; and to identify people who have an implied rather than overtly demonstrated need. Machines learn from a large pool of real-world examples, so they can predict future intent by observing past behavior. Marketers don’t have to comprehend the precise patterns that emerge from massive amounts of data or map out the rules that determine people’s behaviors.

In other words, machine learning shifts the role of the marketer from trying to manipulate customers’ needs to meeting the needs they actually have at a given moment.

Think about a BMW dealership looking to sell more of a particular model. They can use machine learning to identify indicators for people who bought a 5 Series in the past year: They researched similar cars like the Audi A6 and Mercedes E Class, they asked about mileage per gallon, and they had similar demographic traits.

Say I’m looking to buy a car and have a friend who recently bought a 5 Series. I’ve read about one of its new features: a 3D view of the car that I can see from my phone. When I search for “BMW 5 Series” on my iPhone, I’ll see a list of dealerships within a 10-mile radius of my regular commute. I call the dealership to ask about their inventory, and they know I’m ready to buy. I’m automatically matched with the sales rep who sold the same car to my friend, knows the specs I’m interested in, and can talk to me about 3D view.

I see massive opportunity to use predictive capabilities to link online and offline interactions — mobile ads, email campaigns, phone conversations, and in-person experiences. It’s becoming a reality as Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon continue investing in voice assistants and natural language processing technologies. Amazon is reportedly updating Alexa to be more emotionally intelligent. It’s not a huge leap to transition from making voice commands in my living room to calling a business and making a purchase directly through my Echo. A conversation is the most natural form of interaction, and the most conducive to forming relationships.

I think voice will be central to how marketers balance machine learning capabilities with the need to create human experiences. Even if machines can surface information and recommendations at exactly the right time, people still want human conversations, especially when it comes to buying complex or expensive products. I’m fine with Alexa ordering me a pizza, but not a car.

As I see it, the role of machines is to draw correlations between consumers’ behaviors and their ultimate intent. The role of the marketer is to figure out what can be automated (e.g., triggering an email after a purchase is made) and what can be augmented (e.g., predicting what products will most intrigue a customer) by using software. The next wave, Marketing 4.0, will take this a step further by meeting consumers’ expressed and unexpressed needs.

We’re moving toward a more predictive world in which machine learning powers the majority of interactions between consumers and brands. I don’t see this being at odds with human connection or authentic experiences. Marketing will be ambient and truly data-driven. It will catch up with consumer expectations and with the potential of technology to change how marketing is done

Machines are becoming smarter marketers

Samsung Plans To Give Galaxy S8 An AI Digital Assistant

All the cool companies have them: digital assistants. Apple has Siri, Microsoft has Cortana, and Google  has the cleverly named Google Assistant. Now, Samsung plans to bring its own iteration of a virtual assistant in the Galaxy S8 next spring, according to a new report from Reuters.

The assistant will be based on work by Viv Labs, a San Jose-based AI company that Samsung acquired this October (the move immediately fueled speculation that Samsung was moving into the AI space). The founders of Viv Labs already have a strong track record in the field as the creators of Siri, which Apple bought in 2010.

Samsung appears to be tapping into Viv’s existing strengths rather than aiming to revamp the platform. One of Viv’s hallmarks is that it is designed to be a one-stop-shop that works seamlessly with third-party services. “Developers can attach and upload services to our agent,” Samsung Executive Vice President Rhee In-jong said during a briefing, according to Reuters. “Even if Samsung doesn’t do anything on its own, the more services that get attached the smarter this agent will get, learn more new services and provide them to end-users with ease.”

If the digital assistant is a hit, it could help Samsung make up for its financial losses over the Galaxy Note 7 recall, which is projected to cost the company at least $5.4 billion. It could also rebuild consumer confidence after the Note 7 debacle and, more recently, a recall of a Samsung top-loading washing machine due to “impact injuries.”

But the company is entering a crowded market. Apple paved the way with Siri, though its early lead is shrinking after the launch of Google’s Assistant, which can tap into Google’s well-established knowledge graph and search capabilities. And there’s always Amazon Alexa, which already has a home in the smart-home devices the Echo, Dot and Tap.

„Every door can be unlocked.“  Ellen Fondiler

http://www.forbes.com/sites/shelbycarpenter/2016/11/06/samsung-plan-galaxy-s8-ai-digital-assistant

Artificial Intelligence Software Is Booming. But Why Now?

Marc Benioff, left, chief executive of Salesforce, talked with Matthew Panzarino, editor in chief of TechCrunch, at its Disrupt conference in San Francisco last week. Credit Beck Diefenbach/Reuters

SAN FRANCISCO — This is the year artificial intelligence came into its own for mainstream businesses, at least as a marketing feature.

On Sunday, Salesforce.com, which sells online software for sales and marketing, announced it would be adding A.I. to its products. Its system, called Einstein, promises to provide insights into what sales leads to follow and what products to make next.

Salesforce chose this date to pre-empt Oracle, the world’s largest business software company, which on Sunday evening began its annual customer event in San Francisco. High on Oracle’s list of new features: real-time analysis of enormous amounts of data. Oracle calls its product Oracle A.I.

Elsewhere, General Electric is pushing its A.I. business, called Predix. IBM has ads featuring its Watson technology talking with Bob Dylan. These moves, along with similar projects at most major tech companies and consulting firms, represent years of work and billions in investment.

There are big pushes in A.I. in agriculture, manufacturing, aviation and pretty much every other sector of the economy.

It’s all very exciting, the way great possibilities are, and clearly full of great buzzwords and slogans. But will other companies see any value in all this or understand if A.I. has value for them?

“No one really knows where the value is,” said Marc Benioff, co-founder and chief executive of Salesforce. “I think I know — it’s in helping people do the things that people are good at, and turning more things over to machines.”

Mr. Benioff wasn’t selling Einstein’s capabilities short. He was talking about the long-term value of artificial intelligence, which is passing through a familiar phase — a technology that is strange and new, that sometimes overpromises what it can do and is headed for uses not easily seen at the start.

Cloaked inside terms like deep learning and machine intelligence, A.I. is essentially a series of advanced statistics-based exercises that review the past to indicate the likely future, or look at current customer choices to figure out where to put more or less energy.

Perhaps a better question than “What is the value?” of this explosion of advanced statistics is “Why now?” That shows both the opportunity and why many companies are scared about missing out.

Much of today’s A.I. boom goes back to 2006, when Amazon started selling cheap computing over the internet. Those measures built the public clouds of Amazon, Google, IBM and Microsoft, among others. That same year, Google and Yahoo released statistical methods for dealing with the unruly data of human behavior. In 2007, Apple released the first iPhone, a device that began a boom in unruly-data collection everywhere.

Suddenly, old A.I. experiments were relevant, and money and cheap data resources were available for building new algorithms. Ten years later, computing is cheaper than ever, companies live online and in their phone apps, and sensors are bringing even more unruly data from more places.

Amazon, Google and the rest have exceptional A.I. resources for sale, but many older companies are wary of turning their data over to these upstarts. That, along with fear of a competitor getting on top of A.I. first, is a big motivation for some to try things out.

Salesforce is selling Einstein as a system that can work predictive magic without having to look at your data, in what Mr. Benioff calls a “democratizing” move that will create millions of A.I. users who are not engineers.

He said this on his way to attend a series of customer focus groups around the country, however — strong evidence that customers don’t get it yet, even if they’re willing to try it.

“There’s fear of Google and Microsoft controlling everything, and there’s a desire to apply A.I. to anything that’s digital,” said Michael Biltz, managing director of Accenture’s technology vision practice. “People are going to have to experiment, most likely first on pain points like security and product marketing.”

How will we know when the A.I. revolution has taken hold? A technology truly matures when it disappears. We don’t marvel at houses with electricity now, or the idea of driving to work at 60 miles an hour. We can say “phone” and mean a hand-held computer with NASA-level processing power and a professional-quality camera for taking selfies with our drones.

A.I. is probably heading for the same places, invisibly sorting through lots of data everywhere to continuously update and automate most of our lives. Goodness knows what the weird new tech thing will be about at that point.

How Facebook Chatbots Can Revolutionize Your Social Media Strategy

How Facebook Chatbots Can Revolutionize Your Social Media Strategy

The artificial intelligence era… It’s all about embedding human smarts in machines.

Facebook chatbots are one application of this revolution, as they rapidly gain popularity and provide a new tool for marketers to leverage. These chatbots are the incorporation of automatic chatbots within Facebook Messenger.

Chatbots offer flexibility in order to automate tasks, and assist in retrieving data. They are becoming a vital way to enhance the consumer experience for the purpose of better customer service and growing interaction.

In April 2016, Mark Zuckerberg announced that third parties could use the messenger platform to create their own personal chatbot. Since then, the popularity of chatbots has rapidly grown all over the world.

In social media marketing chatbots have evolved, but their prime functionality remains the same, and that is to improve real-time engagement. Customers are always searching for prompt and ready replies to their comments and queries. The chatbots are designed in such a manner that they are able to answer most of the queries placed by customers, without human intervention. And this helps in bonding a strong relationship with your customers and potential crowds, without paying for high overheads on staff.

Two chatbots that have gained immense popularity in no-time are Apple’s Siri and Chotu Bot.

Chatbots: Why such a buzz at present?

Modern advancement in the field of artificial intelligence, which includes neural networking and deep learning, have permitted chatbots to acquire data sets exactly the way the human brain works. This is revolutionary.

Chatbots are instigating a stir in the present world of consumer services. Facebook created a revolution for technology by launching Facebook messenger chatbots which permit businesses to generate an interactive experience, content, e-commerce guides and automate customer service. Messenger has reached more than 900 million users, plus it offers the most striking platform to implement your desired bots.

Maybe the most renowned example  of a chatbot is Apple’s Siri. Like all chatbots, Siri is a perfect combination of pre-defined scripts and neural systems to anticipate a precise reaction to an offered conversation starter or explanation, permitting clients to skip steps while speaking. Siri is a masterpiece that took years for such a huge organization with loads of assets to develop.

Siri for Facebook chatbots

The second example is a chatbot from an organization that is not as famous as Apple. But still the chatbot is so efficient that it has been able to create a lot of buzz for itself in the market.

The Chotu Bot helps you replace various software and get detailed information on various topics such as wiki search, PNR status, Vehicle registration number etc. inside your messenger. And the developers behind the Chotu Bot are preparing to update it so that it can reply to most of the queries asked from all around the planet.

Chotu Bot for Facebook chatbots

How can a Facebook chatbot assist your marketing?

Facebook allows brands to connect their potential customers independently through these messenger bots which leads to a new era in advertising.

The basic idea behind launching the messenger bots is to connect all the people directly to the business in order to automate customer engagement and interactions. Now there are more than 11,500 bots that have been developed on messenger and nearly 23,500 developers signed up in order to build their own bots using tools offered by Facebook. This means it assists you to automate informal interactions between businesses and users.

Recently Facebook announced new features for bots which can easily respond with video, audio, GIFs, and such files that make you build your own bots with ease.

How do chatbots help e-commerce platforms?

Chatbots assist the e-commerce industry by providing functionality in areas such as security, management, monitoring, and customer engagement which are key elements of e-commerce businesses.

Self-service and automation are the ideal way to go ahead in e-commerce, this the ultimate reason why businesses are using chatbots.

Here are just some ideas for how chatbots can make customer engagement easier:

Convenient, contextual and in control

Facebook messenger for chatbots is focused on generating the greatest customer engagement experience. They offer automated updates about traffic, weather, automated messages and much more.

Easy setup and cost savings

Bots help you save time and reduce the cost of hiring staff.

Unprecedented customer reach

The new receive/send API allows you to connect with more than 950 million people in and around the world. That’s the reason bots are growing as the key tool for businesses to gain wonderful networking and commercial opportunities.

How can you use chatbots?

Chatbots make it possible to offer a more proactive, personal, and efficient consumer experience.

how to use chatbots for Facebook chatbots

  • Chotu, one of the leading chatbot technologies, is an AI robot on Facebook messenger that assists in accelerating customer information acquisition through Facebook messages. It provides all the needed information from your messages itself, rather than relying on several different apps working together. Chotu performs multiple tasks at a single time and offers 24×7 customer service.

chotu for customer experience for Facebook chatbots

  • Pizza Hut announced that Facebook messenger chatbots assist their customers in asking questions, viewing their current deals and much more. This helps Pizza Hut interact with their customers more easily at any time and from any place.

36 love questions for Facebook chatbots

  • 36LoveQuestions is a wonderful Facebook messenger chatbot that asks you 36 exact questions in order to determine whether you are in love with someone or not.

Chatbots: From the “simple” customer to enterprises

At present, chatbots are very prevalent in the customer space. From a business point of view, transportation businesses and e-commerce delivery enhance their chances by allowing their customer to purchase products more efficiently.

customer space for Facebook chatbots

But bots are rapidly moving across to the enterprise space as most companies are now building their own chatbots in order to generate better engagement with their customers and create additional value for their brand.

How chatbots are minimizing the gap between customers and brands

Public vs. Private

One of the major problems that various organizations had to face while promoting on social media was to provide a primary customer service to their potential clients. The best thing about [messaging bot] is that you can have a ‘Message Us’ option and truly use this as a one-on-one, private channel.

Consistency

Messaging is a continuous and real-time process between a customer and a brand. You can have a real-time chat with a specialist from the brand, then you can leave and return a day later and see the history… That is truly energizing since that begins to effect customer behavior.

Accessing an audience of over a billion people

Facebook commenced this entire chatbot furor in April by permitting outside bots on its messenger. So even in the worst case, this is the potential crowd you can reach.

Include different systems (WhatsApp has not joined the chatbot fleeting trend yet) and the aggregate gathering of people on messaging platforms is well in an abundance of 1.2 billion. This is the crowd that you can target directly and provide each one special attention.

Who does not like a personal exclusive service?

Chatbots are poised to reform the customer-brand interaction. Facebook knows the potential of personal messaging and they know this idea can be really useful for brands to retain their audiences for a longer period of time.

Any organization today with a chatbot has the capacity to gain customer insights. The more insights they gain, the better the brand messaging will become, which ultimately indicates better targeting and more sales. The best part is that these chatbots are relatively cheap compared to other applications.

A business which takes time to understand chatbots and execute them have a better chance of offering things to their customer and this will really help them build a nice strong relationship over time.

Chatbots are the perfect fit for the modern e-commerce company looking to ramp up customer service.

Companies which are using chatbots are likely to experience better results and acquire the ability to advertise and market new products which ultimately generate customer engagement.

How Facebook Chatbots Can Revolutionize Your Social Media Strategy

The new paradigm for human-bot communication

Editor’s note: Xuchen Yao is co-founder and CEO, and Guoguo Chen and Kenji Sagae are co-founders, of KITT.AI. Daniel Li is an associate at Madrona Venture Group.

Chatbots offer the promise of frictionless access to goods, services and information, but creating effective bots can be deceptively tricky.

The flip side of the opportunity to interact with users in a seamless, natural way is that user expectations can be prohibitively high. Bots need to be smart and provide greater convenience than apps — a very effective UI paradigm tailored for today’s mobile devices that has been carefully refined for more than a decade.

The good news is that the belief that bots must master human language or replace apps to succeed is false. Bots will engage with consumers in new ways that combine the strengths of humans and machines to allow both structured and unstructured information to be exchanged naturally and efficiently.

Communication velocity

One simple but intuitive way to measure the effectiveness of communication is to look at the amount of information exchanged per unit of time. Under this framework, text (e.g. SMS, chat, email) and speech (e.g. phone call) interactions differ in the amount of information that can be produced versus consumed.

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While we typically produce 120 to 140 words per minute when speaking, we can typically only write or type 40 to 70 words per minute. When we look at the speed of information consumption, reading speed in English is upwards of 200 words per minute, but listening speed is limited to the 120 to 140 words per minute of speech production.

SMS and chat apps have adapted to increase text production speed through autocorrect features and novel keyboards, but text production for humans will always be slower than consumption.

Imagine, however, a friend that can type, draw, look up information and find GIFs at superhuman speed, and produce buttons, menus and pictures to make your input faster. Better yet, your enhanced input is much easier for your friend to understand and does not take away the flexibility and familiarity of natural language when needed.

We may not be quite there yet, but we are very close, especially with well-constructed bots on certain platforms. Here is a look at the features of different bot platforms that are shaping human-bot communication toward a more efficient, robust and natural UI paradigm.

Quick-reply buttons

Quick-reply buttons are a simple and convenient way to save user time and prevent unexpected input. They are unique to human-bot communication as buttons are trivial for bots to create and easy for humans to use; benefits include enhanced communication speed and bot comprehension.

Facebook, Telegram and Kik bots all have quick-reply buttons, but under slightly different names, and some bots, such as the Sephora bot on Kik, use the quick-reply button as the primary mode of communication. Slack still lacks quick-reply buttons, but has message buttons with associated actions.

Telegram Custom Keyboard:

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Facebook Messenger Quick Replies:

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Kik Suggested Response Keyboard:

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Callback buttons

Callback buttons are similar to quick-reply buttons but allow for a broader range of potential interactions. When a callback button is clicked, it generates an HTTP call to a registered webhook that triggers a predefined action. Callback buttons are a great way to provide feedback, and they also provide a deeper analytics opportunity for the bot backend.

Slack Message Buttons:

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Messenger Postback Button:

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Telegram Callback Buttons:

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Structured information sharing

Sharing information that can be easily parsed programmatically takes the exchange of structured information from clunky in a language-only paradigm to easy and unambiguous in a hybrid paradigm.

For instance, sharing a location like “3rd & Madison” is ambiguous and slow for humans and machines to parse, while shared GPS coordinates can be quickly displayed with a map service and understood by bots.

Telegram SendContact and SendLocation:

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Facebook Messenger Location Sharing:

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Bot mentions

Inline bots are a great way to quickly obtain, send and share information during chats, without the need to jump out of the current interface (to go to another chat) or the current app (to go to another app).

Instead of multiple taps and menus to perform a specific function, an @ mention at a bot allows for a one-line interaction. Allowing bots to share conversational context with one another also greatly increases the speed of interaction because users no longer need to re-input data for each communication.

Telegram Inline Bot:

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Slack Bot Mention:

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The following table summarizes the added language-touch functionality provided by four popular chat and bot platforms. These features represent the beginning of a hybrid communication paradigm that will enable more efficient and effective communication with bots:

  • Quick-reply buttons: save user time and improve machine comprehension
  • Callback buttons: provide calls to action and back-end analytics
  • Structured info sharing: easily shares machine-readable information
  • Bot mention: make bots always present and easily accessible

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If your bot does not use a language-touch hybrid communication pattern, there are several other ways you can still take some of the UI mechanics from buttons and callbacks to build a better bot:

  • Build your system starting with humans in the loop to identify the most common communication patterns and exceptions to that pattern
  • Optimize dialogue for two-channel — fast and slow — communication with clear, well-defined responses (e.g., “Reply YES to buy”) or open-ended messages (“Can you tell me when the new Taylor Swift record comes out?”)
  • Use callback functions, even without native integration. For more complicated tasks, take users out of chat and move them to a point-and-click or touch interface that is better suited to the task at hand
  • Consider moving to a platform that is better optimized for new human-machine interaction

AI and NLP have a long way to go before bots achieve human-level communication. However, before that happens, new methods of human-machine communication will leverage the strengths of humans and machines to create new interaction paradigms that are as natural as our own language.

The new paradigm for human-bot communication