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What is GDPR – General Data Protection Regulation

Source Techcrunch.com

European Union lawmakers proposed a comprehensive update to the bloc’s data protection and privacy rules in 2012.

Their aim: To take account of seismic shifts in the handling of information wrought by the rise of the digital economy in the years since the prior regime was penned — all the way back in 1995 when Yahoo was the cutting edge of online cool and cookies were still just tasty biscuits.

Here’s the EU’s executive body, the Commission, summing up the goal:

The objective of this new set of rules is to give citizens back control over of their personal data, and to simplify the regulatory environment for business. The data protection reform is a key enabler of the Digital Single Market which the Commission has prioritised. The reform will allow European citizens and businesses to fully benefit from the digital economy.

For an even shorter the EC’s theory is that consumer trust is essential to fostering growth in the digital economy. And it thinks trust can be won by giving users of digital services more information and greater control over how their data is used. Which is — frankly speaking — a pretty refreshing idea when you consider the clandestine data brokering that pervades the tech industry. Mass surveillance isn’t just something governments do.

The General Data Protection Regulation (aka GDPR) was agreed after more than three years of negotiations between the EU’s various institutions.

It’s set to apply across the 28-Member State bloc as of May 25, 2018. That means EU countries are busy transposing it into national law via their own legislative updates (such as the UK’s new Data Protection Bill — yes, despite the fact the country is currently in the process of (br)exiting the EU, the government has nonetheless committed to implementing the regulation because it needs to keep EU-UK data flowing freely in the post-brexit future. Which gives an early indication of the pulling power of GDPR.

Meanwhile businesses operating in the EU are being bombarded with ads from a freshly energized cottage industry of ‘privacy consultants’ offering to help them get ready for the new regs — in exchange for a service fee. It’s definitely a good time to be a law firm specializing in data protection.

GDPR is a significant piece of legislation whose full impact will clearly take some time to shake out. In the meanwhile, here’s our guide to the major changes incoming and some potential impacts.

Data protection + teeth

A major point of note right off the bat is that GDPR does not merely apply to EU businesses; any entities processing the personal data of EU citizens need to comply. Facebook, for example — a US company that handles massive amounts of Europeans’ personal data — is going to have to rework multiple business processes to comply with the new rules. Indeed, it’s been working on this for a long time already.

Last year the company told us it had assembled “the largest cross functional team” in the history of its family of companies to support GDPR compliance — specifying this included “senior executives from all product teams, designers and user experience/testing executives, policy executives, legal executives and executives from each of the Facebook family of companies”.

“Dozens of people at Facebook Ireland are working full time on this effort,” it said, noting too that the data protection team at its European HQ (in Dublin, Ireland) would be growing by 250% in 2017. It also said it was in the process of hiring a “top quality data protection officer” — a position the company appears to still be taking applications for.

The new EU rules require organizations to appoint a data protection officer if they process sensitive data on a large scale (which Facebook very clearly does). Or are collecting info on many consumers — such as by performing online behavioral tracking. But, really, which online businesses aren’t doing that these days?

The extra-territorial scope of GDPR casts the European Union as a global pioneer in data protection — and some legal experts suggest the regulation will force privacy standards to rise outside the EU too.

Sure, some US companies might prefer to swallow the hassle and expense of fragmenting their data handling processes, and treating personal data obtained from different geographies differently, i.e. rather than streamlining everything under a GDPR compliant process. But doing so means managing multiple data regimes. And at very least runs the risk of bad PR if you’re outed as deliberately offering a lower privacy standard to your home users vs customers abroad.

Ultimately, it may be easier (and less risky) for businesses to treat GDPR as the new ‘gold standard’ for how they handle all personal data, regardless of where it comes from.

And while not every company harvests Facebook levels of personal data, almost every company harvests some personal data. So for those with customers in the EU GDPR cannot be ignored. At very least businesses will need to carry out a data audit to understand their risks and liabilities.

Privacy experts suggest that the really big change here is around enforcement. Because while the EU has had long established data protection standards and rules — and treats privacy as a fundamental right — its regulators have lacked the teeth to command compliance.

But now, under GDPR, financial penalties for data protection violations step up massively.

The maximum fine that organizations can be hit with for the most serious infringements of the regulation is 4% of their global annual turnover (or €20M, whichever is greater). Though data protection agencies will of course be able to impose smaller fines too. And, indeed, there’s a tiered system of fines — with a lower level of penalties of up to 2% of global turnover (or €10M).

This really is a massive change. Because while data protection agencies (DPAs) in different EU Member States can impose financial penalties for breaches of existing data laws these fines are relatively small — especially set against the revenues of the private sector entities that are getting sanctioned.

In the UK, for example, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) can currently impose a maximum fine of just £500,000. Compare that to the annual revenue of tech giant Google (~$90BN) and you can see why a much larger stick is needed to police data processors.

It’s not necessarily the case that individual EU Member States are getting stronger privacy laws as a consequence of GDPR (in some instances countries have arguably had higher standards in their domestic law). But the beefing up of enforcement that’s baked into the new regime means there’s a better opportunity for DPAs to start to bark and bite like proper watchdogs.

GDPR inflating the financial risks around handling personal data should naturally drive up standards — because privacy laws are suddenly a whole lot more costly to ignore.

More types of personal data that are hot to handle

So what is personal data under GDPR? It’s any information relating to an identified or identifiable person (in regulatorspeak people are known as ‘data subjects’).

While ‘processing’ can mean any operation performed on personal data — from storing it to structuring it to feeding it to your AI models. (GDPR also includes some provisions specifically related to decisions generated as a result of automated data processing but more on that below).

A new provision concerns children’s personal data — with the regulation setting a 16-year-old age limit on kids’ ability to consent to their data being processed. However individual Member States can choose (and some have) to derogate from this by writing a lower age limit into their laws.

GDPR sets a hard cap at 13-years-old — making that the defacto standard for children to be able to sign up to digital services. So the impact on teens’ social media habits seems likely to be relatively limited.

The new rules generally expand the definition of personal data — so it can include information such as location data, online identifiers (such as IP addresses) and other metadata. So again, this means businesses really need to conduct an audit to identify all the types of personal data they hold. Ignorance is not compliance.

GDPR also encourages the use of pseudonymization — such as, for example, encrypting personal data and storing the encryption key separately and securely — as a pro-privacy, pro-security technique that can help minimize the risks of processing personal data. Although pseudonymized data is likely to still be considered personal data; certainly where a risk of reidentification remains. So it does not get a general pass from requirements under the regulation.

Data has to be rendered truly anonymous to be outside the scope of the regulation. (And given how often ‘anonymized’ data-sets have been shown to be re-identifiable, relying on any anonymizing process to be robust enough to have zero risk of re-identification seems, well, risky.)

To be clear, given GDPR’s running emphasis on data protection via data security it is implicitly encouraging the use of encryption above and beyond a risk reduction technique — i.e. as a way for data controllers to fulfill its wider requirements to use “appropriate technical and organisational measures” vs the risk of the personal data they are processing.

The incoming data protection rules apply to both data controllers (i.e. entities that determine the purpose and means of processing personal data) and data processors (entities that are responsible for processing data on behalf of a data controller — aka subcontractors).

Indeed, data processors have some direct compliance obligations under GDPR, and can also be held equally responsible for data violations, with individuals able to bring compensation claims directly against them, and DPAs able to hand them fines or other sanctions.

So the intent for the regulation is there be no diminishing in responsibility down the chain of data handling subcontractors. GDPR aims to have every link in the processing chain be a robust one.

For companies that rely on a lot of subcontractors to handle data operations on their behalf there’s clearly a lot of risk assessment work to be done.

As noted above, there is a degree of leeway for EU Member States in how they implement some parts of the regulation (such as with the age of data consent for kids).

Consumer protection groups are calling for the UK government to include an optional GDPR provision on collective data redress to its DP bill, for example — a call the government has so far rebuffed.

But the wider aim is for the regulation to harmonize as much as possible data protection rules across all Member States to reduce the regulatory burden on digital businesses trading around the bloc.

On data redress, European privacy campaigner Max Schrems — most famous for his legal challenge to US government mass surveillance practices that resulted in a 15-year-old data transfer arrangement between the EU and US being struck down in 2015 — is currently running a crowdfunding campaign to set up a not-for-profit privacy enforcement organization to take advantage of the new rules and pursue strategic litigation on commercial privacy issues.

Schrems argues it’s simply not viable for individuals to take big tech giants to court to try to enforce their privacy rights, so thinks there’s a gap in the regulatory landscape for an expert organization to work on EU citizen’s behalf. Not just pursuing strategic litigation in the public interest but also promoting industry best practice.

The proposed data redress body — called noyb; short for: ‘none of your business’ — is being made possible because GDPR allows for collective enforcement of individuals’ data rights. And that provision could be crucial in spinning up a centre of enforcement gravity around the law. Because despite the position and role of DPAs being strengthened by GDPR, these bodies will still inevitably have limited resources vs the scope of the oversight task at hand.

Some may also lack the appetite to take on a fully fanged watchdog role. So campaigning consumer and privacy groups could certainly help pick up any slack.

Privacy by design and privacy by default

Another major change incoming via GDPR is ‘privacy by design’ no longer being just a nice idea; privacy by design and privacy by default become firm legal requirements.

This means there’s a requirement on data controllers to minimize processing of personal data — limiting activity to only what’s necessary for a specific purpose, carrying out privacy impact assessments and maintaining up-to-date records to prove out their compliance.

Consent requirements for processing personal data are also considerably strengthened under GDPR — meaning lengthy, inscrutable, pre-ticked T&Cs are likely to be unworkable. (And we’ve sure seen a whole lot of those hellish things in tech.) The core idea is that consent should be an ongoing, actively managed process; not a one-off rights grab.

As the UK’s ICO tells it, consent under GDPR for processing personal data means offering individuals “genuine choice and control” (for sensitive personal data the law requires a higher standard still — of explicit consent).

There are other legal bases for processing personal data under GDPR — such as contractual necessity; or compliance with a legal obligation under EU or Member State law; or for tasks carried out in the public interest — so it is not necessary to obtain consent in order to process someone’s personal data. But there must always be an appropriate legal basis for each processing.

Transparency is another major obligation under GDPR, which expands the notion that personal data must be lawfully and fairly processed to include a third principle of accountability. Hence the emphasis on data controllers needing to clearly communicate with data subjects — such as by informing them of the specific purpose of the data processing.

The obligation on data handlers to maintain scrupulous records of what information they hold, what they are doing with it, and how they are legally processing it, is also about being able to demonstrate compliance with GDPR’s data processing principles.

But — on the plus side for data controllers — GDPR removes the requirement to submit notifications to local DPAs about data processing activities. Instead, organizations must maintain detailed internal records — which a supervisory authority can always ask to see.

It’s also worth noting that companies processing data across borders in the EU may face scrutiny from DPAs in different Member States if they have users there (and are processing their personal data).

Although the GDPR sets out a so-called ‘one-stop-shop’ principle — that there should be a “lead” DPA to co-ordinate supervision between any “concerned” DPAs — this does not mean that, once it applies, a cross-EU-border operator like Facebook is only going to be answerable to the concerns of the Irish DPA.

Indeed, Facebook’s tactic of only claiming to be under the jurisdiction of a single EU DPA looks to be on borrowed time. And the one-stop-shop provision in the GDPR seems more about creating a co-operation mechanism to allow multiple DPAs to work together in instances where they have joint concerns, rather than offering a way for multinationals to go ‘forum shopping’ — which the regulation does not permit (per WP29 guidance).

Another change: Privacy policies that contain vague phrases like ‘We may use your personal data to develop new services’ or ‘We may use your personal data for research purposes’ will not pass muster under the new regime. So a wholesale rewriting of vague and/or confusingly worded T&Cs is something Europeans can look forward to this year.

Add to that, any changes to privacy policies must be clearly communicated to the user on an ongoing basis. Which means no more stale references in the privacy statement telling users to ‘regularly check for changes or updates’ — that just won’t be workable.

The onus is firmly on the data controller to keep the data subject fully informed of what is being done with their information. (Which almost implies that good data protection practice could end up tasting a bit like spam, from a user PoV.)

The overall intent behind GDPR is to inculcate an industry-wide shift in perspective regarding who ‘owns’ user data — disabusing companies of the notion that other people’s personal information belongs to them just because it happens to be sitting on their servers.

“Organizations should acknowledge they don’t exist to process personal data but they process personal data to do business,” is how analyst Gartner research director Bart Willemsen sums this up. “Where there is a reason to process the data, there is no problem. Where the reason ends, the processing should, too.”

The data protection officer (DPO) role that GDPR brings in as a requirement for many data handlers is intended to help them ensure compliance.

This officer, who must report to the highest level of management, is intended to operate independently within the organization, with warnings to avoid an internal appointment that could generate a conflict of interests.

Which types of organizations face the greatest liability risks under GDPR? “Those who deliberately seem to think privacy protection rights is inferior to business interest,” says Willemsen, adding: “A recent example would be Uber, regulated by the FTC and sanctioned to undergo 20 years of auditing. That may hurt perhaps similar, or even more, than a one-time financial sanction.”

“Eventually, the GDPR is like a speed limit: There not to make money off of those who speed, but to prevent people from speeding excessively as that prevents (privacy) accidents from happening,” he adds.

Another right to be forgotten

Under GDPR, people who have consented to their personal data being processed also have a suite of associated rights — including the right to access data held about them (a copy of the data must be provided to them free of charge, typically within a month of a request); the right to request rectification of incomplete or inaccurate personal data; the right to have their data deleted (another so-called ‘right to be forgotten’ — with some exemptions, such as for exercising freedom of expression and freedom of information); the right to restrict processing; the right to data portability (where relevant, a data subject’s personal data must be provided free of charge and in a structured, commonly used and machine readable form).

All these rights make it essential for organizations that process personal data to have systems in place which enable them to identify, access, edit and delete individual user data — and be able to perform these operations quickly, with a general 30 day time-limit for responding to individual rights requests.

GDPR also gives people who have consented to their data being processed the right to withdraw consent at any time. Let that one sink in.

Data controllers are also required to inform users about this right — and offer easy ways for them to withdraw consent. So no, you can’t bury a ‘revoke consent’ option in tiny lettering, five sub-menus deep. Nor can WhatsApp offer any more time-limit opt-outs for sharing user data with its parent multinational, Facebook. Users will have the right to change their mind whenever they like.

The EU lawmakers’ hope is that this suite of rights for consenting consumers will encourage respectful use of their data — given that, well, if you annoy consumers they can just tell you to sling yer hook and ask for a copy of their data to plug into your rival service to boot. So we’re back to that fostering trust idea.

Add in the ability for third party organizations to use GDPR’s provision for collective enforcement of individual data rights and there’s potential for bad actors and bad practice to become the target for some creative PR stunts that harness the power of collective action — like, say, a sudden flood of requests for a company to delete user data.

Data rights and privacy issues are certainly going to be in the news a whole lot more.

Getting serious about data breaches

But wait, there’s more! Another major change under GDPR relates to security incidents — aka data breaches (something else we’ve seen an awful, awful lot of in recent years) — with the regulation doing what the US still hasn’t been able to: Bringing in a universal standard for data breach disclosures.

GDPR requires that data controllers report any security incidents where personal data has been lost, stolen or otherwise accessed by unauthorized third parties to their DPA within 72 hours of them becoming aware of it. Yes, 72 hours. Not the best part of a year, like er Uber.

If a data breach is likely to result in a “high risk of adversely affecting individuals’ rights and freedoms” the regulation also implies you should ‘fess up even sooner than that — without “undue delay”.

Only in instances where a data controller assesses that a breach is unlikely to result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of “natural persons” are they exempt from the breach disclosure requirement (though they still need to document the incident internally, and record their reason for not informing a DPA in a document that DPAs can always ask to see).

“You should ensure you have robust breach detection, investigation and internal reporting procedures in place,” is the ICO’s guidance on this. “This will facilitate decision-making about whether or not you need to notify the relevant supervisory authority and the affected individuals.”

The new rules generally put strong emphasis on data security and on the need for data controllers to ensure that personal data is only processed in a manner that ensures it is safeguarded.

Here again, GDPR’s requirements are backed up by the risk of supersized fines. So suddenly sloppy security could cost your business big — not only in reputation terms, as now, but on the bottom line too. So it really must be a C-suite concern going forward.

Nor is subcontracting a way to shirk your data security obligations. Quite the opposite. Having a written contract in place between a data controller and a data processor was a requirement before GDPR but contract requirements are wider now and there are some specific terms that must be included in the contract, as a minimum.

Breach reporting requirements must also be set out in the contract between processor and controller. If a data controller is using a data processor and it’s the processor that suffers a breach, they’re required to inform the controller as soon as they become aware. The controller then has the same disclosure obligations as per usual.

Essentially, data controllers remain liable for their own compliance with GDPR. And the ICO warns they must only appoint processors who can provide “sufficient guarantees” that the regulatory requirements will be met and the rights of data subjects protected.

tl;dr, be careful who and how you subcontract.

Right to human review for some AI decisions

Article 22 of GDPR places certain restrictions on entirely automated decisions based on profiling individuals — but only in instances where these human-less acts have a legal or similarly significant effect on the people involved.

There are also some exemptions to the restrictions — where automated processing is necessary for entering into (or performance of) a contract between an organization and the individual; or where it’s authorized by law (e.g. for the purposes of detecting fraud or tax evasion); or where an individual has explicitly consented to the processing.

In its guidance, the ICO specifies that the restriction only applies where the decision has a “serious negative impact on an individual”.

Suggested examples of the types of AI-only decisions that will face restrictions are automatic refusal of an online credit application or an e-recruiting practices without human intervention.

Having a provision on automated decisions is not a new right, having been brought over from the 1995 data protection directive. But it has attracted fresh attention — given the rampant rise of machine learning technology — as a potential route for GDPR to place a check on the power of AI blackboxes to determine the trajectory of humankind.

The real-world impact will probably be rather more prosaic, though. And experts suggest it does not seem likely that the regulation, as drafted, equates to a right for people to be given detailed explanations of how algorithms work.

Though as AI proliferates and touches more and more decisions, and as its impacts on people and society become ever more evident, pressure may well grow for proper regulatory oversight of algorithmic blackboxes.

In the meanwhile, what GDPR does in instances where restrictions apply to automated decisions is require data controllers to provide some information to individuals about the logic of an automated decision.

They are also obliged to take steps to prevent errors, bias and discrimination. So there’s a whiff of algorithmic accountability. Though it may well take court and regulatory judgements to determine how stiff those steps need to be in practice.

Individuals do also have a right to challenge and request a (human) review of an automated decision in the restricted class.

Here again the intention is to help people understand how their data is being used. And to offer a degree of protection (in the form of a manual review) if a person feels unfairly and harmfully judged by an AI process.

The regulation also places some restrictions on the practice of using data to profile individuals if the data itself is sensitive data — e.g. health data, political belief, religious affiliation etc — requiring explicit consent for doing so. Or else that the processing is necessary for substantial public interest reasons (and lies within EU or Member State law).

While profiling based on other types of personal data does not require obtaining consent from the individuals concerned, it still needs a legal basis and there is still a transparency requirement — which means service providers will need to inform users they are being profiled, and explain what it means for them.

And people also always have the right to object to profiling activity based on their personal data.

 

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/20/wtf-is-gdpr/

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Google introduces an ad blocker to Chrome – Filtering – Censorship?

Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images

Google will introduce an ad blocker to Chrome early next year and is telling publishers to get ready.

The warning is meant to let websites assess their ads and strip any particularly disruptive ones from their pages. That’s because Chrome’s ad blocker won’t block all ads from the web. Instead, it’ll only block ads on pages that are determined to have too many annoying or intrusive advertisements, like videos that autoplay with sound or interstitials that take up the entire screen.

Sridhar Ramaswamy, the executive in charge of Google’s ads, writes in a blog post that even ads “owned or served by Google” will be blocked on pages that don’t meet Chrome’s guidelines.

Instead of an ad “blocker,” Google is referring to the feature as an ad “filter,” according toThe Wall Street Journal, since it will still allow ads to be displayed on pages that meet the right requirements. The blocker will work on both desktop and mobile.

Google is providing a tool that publishers can run to find out if their sites’ ads are in violation and will be blocked in Chrome. Unacceptable ads are being determined by a group called the Coalition for Better Ads, which includes Google, Facebook, News Corp, and The Washington Post as members.

Google shows publishers which of their ads are considered disruptive.

The feature is certain to be controversial. On one hand, there are huge benefits for both consumers and publishers. But on the other, it gives Google immense power over what the web looks like, partly in the name of protecting its own revenue.

First, the benefits: bad ads slow down the web, make the web hard and annoying to browse, and have ultimately driven consumers to install ad blockers that remove all advertisements no matter what. A world where that continues and most users block all ads looks almost apocalyptic for publishers, since nearly all of your favorite websites rely on ads to stay afloat. (The Verge, as you have likely noticed, included.)

By implementing a limited blocking tool, Google can limit the spread of wholesale ad blocking, which ultimately benefits everyone. Users get a better web experience. And publishers get to continue using the ad model that’s served the web well for decades — though they may lose some valuable ad units in the process.

There’s also a good argument to be made that stripping out irritating ads is no different than blocking pop ups, which web browsers have done for years, as a way to improve the experience for consumers.

But there are drawbacks to building an ad blocker into Chrome: most notably, the amount of power it gives Google. Ultimately, it means Google gets to decide what qualifies as an acceptable ad (though it’s basing this on standards set collectively by the Coalition for Better Ads). That’s a good thing if you trust Google to remain benign and act in everyone’s interests. But keep in mind that Google is, at its core, an ad company. Nearly 89 percent of its revenue comes from displaying ads.

The Chrome ad blocker doesn’t just help publishers, it also helps Google maintain its dominance. And it advantages Google’s own ad units, which, it’s safe to say, will not be in violation of the bad ad rules.

This leaves publishers with fewer options to monetize their sites. And given that Chrome represents more than half of all web browsing on desktop and mobile, publishers will be hard pressed not to comply.

Google will also include an option for visitors to pay websites that they’re blocking ads on, through a program it’s calling Funding Choices. Publishers will have to enable support for this feature individually. But Google already tested a similar feature for more than two years, and it never really caught on. So it’s hard to imagine publishers seeing what’s essentially a voluntary tipping model as a viable alternative to ads.

Ramaswamy says that the goal of Chrome’s ad blocker is to make online ads better. “We believe these changes will ensure all content creators, big and small, can continue to have a sustainable way to fund their work with online advertising,” he writes.

And what Ramaswamy says is probably true: Chrome’s ad blocker likely will clean up the web and result in a better browsing experience. It just does that by giving a single advertising juggernaut a whole lot of say over what’s good and bad.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/6/1/15726778/chrome-ad-blocker-early-2018-announced-google

9 Steps to Get Millions of Views on Your YouTube Channel

9-steps-to-get-millions-of-views-on-your-youtube-channel

YouTube is the second most powerful search engine on the planet, and holds the top spot as the largest video network in existence.

The video site continues to grow more pervasive with the maturation of smartphone technology. Today, half of YouTube video views stem from mobile devices.

For this reason, and many others, YouTube is the master of reaching across generational boundaries to impact and engage members of GenX, GenY and GenZ. For example, YouTube currently reaches more 18-34 and 18-49 year-olds than any U.S cable network currently broadcasting.

Because of the popularity of the platform, influencers have spawned from the network and continually leave lasting impressions on their dedicated viewers. Studies suggest that recommendations from influencers are trusted 92% more than from celebrities or advertisements.

The trust factor brought forth by influencers is one of the most notable reasons as to why influencer marketing is so effective.

It’s not as simple as it looks

Leveraging influencers on YouTube is not as simple as it sounds. Because there are many performance and brand risks associated with YouTubers that need to be managed in order to deliver rockstar results.

YouTubers are legitimate masters of their craft and make their living by presenting themselves authentically. This means that brand interference regarding their voice or image is not normally welcomed.

Despite the challenges, brands and YouTubers can get along famously when the right partnership is forged.

The balancing act

By way of example, Google recently recruited famed YouTube influencer Lewis Hilsenteger from the channel Unbox Therapy to help make some noise about Android Pay.

The video depicted Lewis travelling throughout New York City, visiting destinations that accept the form of payment to prove that you could survive solely with Android Pay. This is a prime example of recruiting an influencer that expresses a brand’s message while maintaining their authenticity.

The video generated 1.7 million views while showing off the real-world capabilities of Android Pay.                     

unbox-therapy-for-views-on-your-youtube-channel

No doubt successful collaborations like these and the significant revenue generation potential spurred Google to recently acquire influencer marketplace Famebit.

The 9 key steps to get millions of views on YouTube

Below you’ll find nine steps that fast-casual restaurant chain Qdoba Mexican Eats took when engaging the YouTube audience for the first time.

The results were phenomenal (and, in full disclosure, delivered under the direction of, as well as executed by digital marketing agency Evolve!, Inc.).

If you’re planning on diving into YouTube to help grow your business, use this campaign as a model – it delivered 3 million views, 84K social engagements, and 200M potential impressions, all while adhering to strict brand guidelines and beating aggressive price targets.

1. Set your goals and success criteria

As with any marketing campaign, align your influencer marketing campaign with your overall marketing and sales goals.

Define success using quality metrics, such as messaging and how the brand is portrayed, as well as quantifiable targets such as cost per video view, average length of video view, number of targeted views, and cost per conversion.

2. Set a budget

The cost per view charged for YouTube sponsorships varies WIDELY, depending on factors such as audience size, reach, demographics, engagement, their industry vertical and genre, the type of sponsorship and length of integration, the YouTuber’s desire to work with a particular brand, and whether the talent is represented by an agency.

A good rule of thumb is to target a .04 – .07 cents cost per view (CPV) for video integrations and a .08 to .15 CPV for dedicated videos.

Brands should also set aside budget for content generation (landing pages, blog posts, prizes and and/or promotions), analytics software for tracking, a promotional ad budget, and manpower.

3. Create a theme and campaign messaging that supports your goals

It can be something as simple as capturing people’s excitement as they try delicious Qdoba entrees for the first time (#QdobaUnbox), or reveling in the occasions when More is Better (#MoreIsBetter), including indulging in Qdoba’s generous array of delicious toppings (#MoreFlavorIsBetter).

Evolve even created a contest celebrating Qdoba’s key differentiating factor: Free Guacamole (#FreeGuac).

Develop brand, and campaign-specific messaging, but leave ample room for YouTubers to exercise their creative license.

create-a-theme-for-views-on-your-youtube-channel

Remember, integrations are NOT advertisements.  Videos that come off as too commercial tend to get panned in the comments and generate lower-than-expected view counts.

4. Establish your selection criteria

What constitutes a brand match?

Start with genres, industries and channel demographics, including age, sex and geography.

Does the campaign theme fit their interests? Do they create content that would resonate with or offend your audience?

Identify any influencers that meet this criteria, fall within the audience size that you are looking to engage, and begin the outreach process.

5. Develop a pitch letter

Be clear about the campaign requirements, and set expectations: Are you looking for an integration or a dedicated video?  What four or five key messages do YouTubers need to address in the video?  And what is your timeline?

Basically, what are the promotional requirements and is there any additional information you need from them when they respond to your proposal.

But bear in mind that people who have built sizeable, engaged followings can afford to be choosy about which brands they want to work with. You may want to excite them with something that’s unique about your brand.

Qdoba offered vloggers a summer of free food, in addition to the paid sponsorship.

6. Recruit enthusiastic YouTubers

This is perhaps the most time-consuming step, and the most critical to the success of your campaign.

You know you’ve hit gold when you’ve identified YouTubers who meet your brand criteria, like your brand and offer creative story lines, and sometimes bonus promotions in their response.

There are 3 routes to recruit YouTubers:

  • Outreach directly to the people you want to work with via the email listed on their YouTube channel
  • Work with talent agencies you know and trust
  • Solicit proposals through influencer marketplaces like Famebit, Grapevine Logic or Reelio

recruit-enthusiastic-youtubers-for-views-on-your-youtube-channel

7. Spell out everything in the contract

Flush out the creative before finalizing the contract, and include the type of integration, key messages, project timeline, the reviews process and video promotions.

YouTubers tend NOT to want the brand to weigh in on things like the Video Title or storyline outside the integration. On the same token, it is vital to be somewhat flexible when working with influencers on the creative direction of the content. These folks have built substantial followings that are enchanted by their unique voice. Setting too rigid of a structure that is outside the norm for influencers could result in a deal going south or a video not receiving the attention it deserves.

8. A/B test everything. Measure, tweak and repeat

Test various genres, campaign themes, messaging, calls to action, and amplification strategies. At this stage, we generally prefer to partner with YouTubers that have small but engaged audiences. This will allow you to get the most bang for your buck while simultaneously minimizing any potential losses for creatives that do not resonate with audiences.

ab-test-everything-for-views-on-your-youtube-channel

Measure campaign performance, focusing on actual video views, social engagements and cost per conversions, if that’s relevant. Pivot as needed and update projected outcomes.

We use several tools simultaneously, including Simply Measured, to monitor multiple channels to gain the most clear and comprehensive picture possible.

ab3

ab2

9. Scale!

Once the campaign has been optimized, turn up the volume. Contract larger YouTube channels, and consider using contests or launching several videos at once to support product launches.

These introduce an added layer of complexity because they need to adhere to strict timelines and you potentially need to manage multiple videos at once. On the flipside, they also generally produce much more significant results, so while efforts will become more intricate, they will also become much more fruitful.

Qdoba A/B tested several concepts before running a two week #FreeGuac campaign, which drove 2.4 million video views. Participating YouTube vloggers invited their viewers to enter into a scavenger hunt contest for the chance to win cash prizes, free food and cool SWAG.

Contests like these are ideal for scaling a campaign as almost any marketing element that engages an audience on a participatory level is going to garner more attention compared to content that is merely observed through comments and shares. The contest subsequently resulted in Qdoba collecting over 10K contest submissions.

Wrap

As video continues to grow, YouTube is quickly transitioning into the premier influencer marketing channel. The power of video content is unmatched by its predecessors and influencer marketing, when managed properly, has the ability to permeate and engage an audience in unparalleled fashion.

The most challenging aspect of this discipline is that the rules of engagement are constantly in flux, meaning that for the best results, it is advisable to collaborate with specialty digital marketing agencies that work day-in and day-out crafting influencer strategies on YouTube that resonate, sell, and make a brand’s efforts worthwhile.

9 Steps to Get Millions of Views on Your YouTube Channel

Machines are becoming smarter marketers

artificial-intelligence-930x620

Marketing is only helpful when it’s meeting a need. It sounds simple, but those needs can be really tough to parse. Like any consumer, my needs evolve every day, if not every minute. I won’t stand for poorly targeted ads or messages that are irrelevant to me.

I work in marketing technology, and this industry has been talking about data-driven personalization for years. We’ve made a lot of progress, but we’re only just beginning to realize the potential of machine learning to match goods and services with a particular person in a specific situation.

Machines are changing how marketing is done. I’m not just talking about workflow automation or customer service bots. I’m talking about software that can help brands understand, meet, and even predict the subtlest of consumer needs.

It’s a new phase that I think of as Marketing 3.0. The 1.0 version, marketing in its early 20th century form, involved selling products to people who had demonstrated a need. The 1950s saw the rise of Marketing 2.0: ad men who shaped consumer desires to sell products. Machine learning allows marketers to move beyond this model and return to the original purpose of marketing, while adding speed and scale.

Marketing 1.0: Meeting needs as expressed
Marketing 2.0: Creating needs, then meeting them
Marketing 3.0: Machines analyzing needs, then meeting them

Marketing 3.0 uses machine learning to match product and consumer faster, more precisely, and in the right context; and to identify people who have an implied rather than overtly demonstrated need. Machines learn from a large pool of real-world examples, so they can predict future intent by observing past behavior. Marketers don’t have to comprehend the precise patterns that emerge from massive amounts of data or map out the rules that determine people’s behaviors.

In other words, machine learning shifts the role of the marketer from trying to manipulate customers’ needs to meeting the needs they actually have at a given moment.

Think about a BMW dealership looking to sell more of a particular model. They can use machine learning to identify indicators for people who bought a 5 Series in the past year: They researched similar cars like the Audi A6 and Mercedes E Class, they asked about mileage per gallon, and they had similar demographic traits.

Say I’m looking to buy a car and have a friend who recently bought a 5 Series. I’ve read about one of its new features: a 3D view of the car that I can see from my phone. When I search for “BMW 5 Series” on my iPhone, I’ll see a list of dealerships within a 10-mile radius of my regular commute. I call the dealership to ask about their inventory, and they know I’m ready to buy. I’m automatically matched with the sales rep who sold the same car to my friend, knows the specs I’m interested in, and can talk to me about 3D view.

I see massive opportunity to use predictive capabilities to link online and offline interactions — mobile ads, email campaigns, phone conversations, and in-person experiences. It’s becoming a reality as Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon continue investing in voice assistants and natural language processing technologies. Amazon is reportedly updating Alexa to be more emotionally intelligent. It’s not a huge leap to transition from making voice commands in my living room to calling a business and making a purchase directly through my Echo. A conversation is the most natural form of interaction, and the most conducive to forming relationships.

I think voice will be central to how marketers balance machine learning capabilities with the need to create human experiences. Even if machines can surface information and recommendations at exactly the right time, people still want human conversations, especially when it comes to buying complex or expensive products. I’m fine with Alexa ordering me a pizza, but not a car.

As I see it, the role of machines is to draw correlations between consumers’ behaviors and their ultimate intent. The role of the marketer is to figure out what can be automated (e.g., triggering an email after a purchase is made) and what can be augmented (e.g., predicting what products will most intrigue a customer) by using software. The next wave, Marketing 4.0, will take this a step further by meeting consumers’ expressed and unexpressed needs.

We’re moving toward a more predictive world in which machine learning powers the majority of interactions between consumers and brands. I don’t see this being at odds with human connection or authentic experiences. Marketing will be ambient and truly data-driven. It will catch up with consumer expectations and with the potential of technology to change how marketing is done

Machines are becoming smarter marketers

Paris motor show 2016 review: A-Z of all the new cars

The Paris motor show is heralded as the world’s biggest motor show, claiming more visitor footfall than any other auto show. No wonder car makers are scrambling to prepare their new car launches in time.

Here we round up all the cars, world debuts and major launches at the Paris motor show. Think of it as a handy one-stop shop for everything about the Mondial de l’Automobile, including a continuously updated list of all the key cars unveiled on the day.

The new 2017 Audi A5 Sportback: a Paris motor show debut

AUDI
A5 Sportback (above): The slinkier new five-door A5 hatchback is unveiled
Q5: Ingolstadt is readying the replacement Q5 Mk2 for a Paris debut

BMW
Concept car: 
Not the new 5-series, but a new crossover concept is coming

CITROEN
C3 (below): The French will launch chic new supermini at the Paris motor show
C3 WRC concept:

CXperience: Plug-in hybrid concept previews Citroen’s upcoming design language

Citroen C3: Paris motor show 2016 world debut

DACIA
2016 range updates: 
Fresh styling, trim and features for Sandero, Sandero Stepway and Logan MCV

FERRARI
GTC4 Lusso T:  New V8-engined version of the car formerly known as the FF
LaFerrari convertible:
 
Maranello’s taken a tin-opener to its fastest supercar

HONDA
Civic (below):  
Next Civic is another French debutant; everything you need to know about Civic Mk10
Civic Type R prototype:  New prototype offers a look at the next-gen hot hatch from Honda

2016 Honda Civic

HYUNDAI
i10: Revamped city car gets new tech and fresh styling
i20 WRC:  Get your first look at the 2017 WRC entry from Hyundai
i30:  Third-gen hatchback family confirmed for the Paris motor show
RN30 concept:  New 375bhp hot-hatch concept targets the Focus RS

INFINITI
Q60:
 UK pricing revealed for sleek new coupe
QX Sport:
 
We’re expecting a refreshed version of the new mid-sized crossover concept from Beijing
VC-T variable compression ratio engines:  CO2-crushing new engine tech at Paris

KIA
Carens:
 Practical MPV gets new styling and tech for 2016
Rio:
 
New Rio supermini to make its public debut at the French car show
Soul: Revamped Kia Soul gets new 201bhp turbo engine

The new Land Rover Discovery: covers come off at the Paris motor show

LAND ROVER
Discovery (above):  The all-new Discovery, now revealed in full, is set to be one of the big draws at Paris

LEXUS
UX crossover concept:
 Latest concept aims to showcase new tech and connectivity features
Kinetic Seat Concept:  The humble car seat, as you’ve never seen it before

MERCEDES-BENZ
AMG GT Roadster:  French guillotine beheads Merc’s glorious sports car in Paris
AMG R50 hypercar (below):  Big Paris shock, as Merc confirms F1-engined hypercar
E-class All-Terrain:  Merc chases the Allroad dollar with E-class in wellies
Electric SUV concept:  We’re expecting a mid-sized e-crossover
GLC 43 4Matic Coupe: Sleeker version of the twin-turbo GLC SUV steps out
Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6:  A closer look at the new super-luxury concept

The new Mercedes-AMG R50 hypercar - F1-engined!

MINI
Clubman JCW:  It’s the most powerful version of Mini’s compact estate to date

MITSUBISHI
GT-PHEV Concept:  
A conceptual look ahead to the next Outlander SUV

NISSAN
Micra:  
Slicker, more Europeanised supermini takes a bow at Paris motor show

PEUGEOT
3008:  
Lumpy crossover enters the mainstream in prettier, more conventional Mk2
5008:  Double-oh Peugeot reborn as a family crossover; seen first in Paris
3008 DKR race car:  New rally-raid special shown ahead of 2017 Dakar

PORSCHE
Panamera (below):  
It’s the brand spanking new, prettier Panam sports saloon Mk2

The new 2016 Porsche Panamera: a Paris motor show launch

RENAULT
Alaskan:  
La Regie unleashes its first pick-up at its home show in Paris
Koleos:  New ‘Initiale Paris’ version of luxury SUV unveiled
Trezor:  Sleek EV coupe packs a 345bhp punch
Zoe:  Renault’s upped the Zoe’s maximum range to 250 miles

SEAT
Ateca X-Perience:  
Rugged new concept showcases potential production car

SKODA
Kodiaq:  
A major launch for Skoda as it unveils its first full-size family crossover

SMART
Fortwo and Forfour Electric Drive:  World premiere of the e-Smart is scheduled for Paris

SSANGYONG
LIV-2 SUV concept:  
This one points to the next-generation Rexton SUV, we reckon

SUZUKI
Ignis:
 European debut for the new baby crossover inspired baby
SX4 S-Cross:  Mild facelift for 2017 model year SUV

TOYOTA
C-HR crossover:  
Final production sight of the new compact SUV, after Geneva design reveal
Gazoo Racing:  New umbrella body for all Toyota’s motorsports will launch in Paris
Prius Plug-in Hybrid:  European debut for Toyota’s plug-n-play Prius
FCV Plus:  Another Euro first for this fuel-cell show car

VAUXHALL
Ampera-e: 
New EV features plenty of punch and long range, but we won’t get it – yet

VOLKSWAGEN
I.D. electric car concept (below):  Volkswagen promises dramatic change with new long-range EV
Volkswagen announces 13th brand:  Mystery Berlin-based brand being worked on

VW I.D. concept

http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/car-news/motor-shows-events/paris/2016/paris-motor-show-2016-review-news-photos-a-z-new-cars/

Roaming Regulierung EU Draft 2016-09-05

Regulierungs-Text aus: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/draft-commission-implementing-regulation-roaming-fair-use-policy PART-2016-207353V1

Highlights:

 

Aus für Roaming-Gebühren: EU macht Vorschlag für „Fair Use“

Im Sommer 2017 fallen Roaming-Gebühren für Handytelefonate im EU-Ausland weg. Mit einer „Fair Use“-Regel will die EU-Kommission verhindern, dass Kunden sich Preisunterschiede in den Ländern auf Dauer zu Nutze machen.

Die EU-Kommission hat am Montag in Brüssel einen Entwurf vorgelegt, wie das endgültige Aus für Gebührenaufschläge bei Handygesprächen im EU-Ausland umgesetzt werden soll. Ab Sommer 2017 sollen die Mobilfunknetzbetreiber keine Aufschläge mehr berechnen dürfen, wenn Kunden im EU-Ausland telefonieren. In ihrem Entwurf für die Umsetzung macht die Kommission Vorschläge für „Fair Use“-Regeln, die einen Missbrauch verhindern sollen. Der Vorschlag wird nun mit den Mitgliedsstaaten und der europäischen Regulierungsgremium abgestimmt. Mitte Dezember will die Kommission dann die Regeln offiziell machen.

Fair Use: „Bis zu 90 Tage in einem anderen Land“

Mit den Fair-Use-Regeln will die Kommission auch den Befürchtungen der Netzbetreiber entgegenkommen, dass Nutzer mit einem günstigen Tarif aus dem einen europäischen Land sich dauerhaft in einem anderen Land aufhalten, wo sie mehr bezahlen müssten. Brüssel fürchtet, das könnte langfristig zu steigenden Preisen führen. Um das zu verhindern, schlägt die Kommission eine Frist von 90 Tagen vor.

Bis zu 90 Tage sollen sich EU-Bürger in einem anderen Land aufhalten und dort zu Konditionen ihres Vertrages telefonieren und surfen können, bis der Netzbetreiber Aufschläge erheben kann. Zugleich sollen Netzbetreiber aber verlangen dürfen, dass sich der Kunde mindestens einmal alle 30 Tage in sein Heimatnetz einbucht. Das schränkt die 90 Tage deutlich ein: Ein paar Wochen Urlaub oder eine Dienstreise ist abgedeckt, das zweimonatige Praktikum schon nicht mehr.

Aufschläge

Auch die danach möglichen Aufschläge möchte die EU-Kommission begrenzen. Sie sollennicht über den Großhandelspreisen liegen, die sich die Netzbetreiber gegenseitig berechnen. Die Obergrenzen für die Großhandelspreise werden derzeit noch von Kommission, Parlament und den Vertretern der Mitgliedsstaaten abgestimmt. Die EU-Kommission schlägt eine Obergrenze von 4 Cent pro Minute, 1 Cent pro SMS und 0,85 Cent pro Megabyte vor.

Für Menschen, die im Grenzgebiet wohnen oder grenzüberschreitend pendeln, schlägt die Kommission Sonderregelungen vor. Wenn sich das Handy dort ins Netz des Nachbarlandes einbucht, sollte das den Bürgern dort nicht zum Nachteil sein. Solange sie sich am selben Tag auch wieder im Netz des Heimatlandes einbuchen, solle das nicht als Roaming angerechnet werden.

Pre-Paid-Handel

Auch paneuropäischen Handel von billigen Pre-Paid-Karten will die Kommission vorbeugen. So sollen die Netzbetreiber verlangen können, dass eine Pre-Paid-Karte schon eine Weile im Heimnetz aktiv gewesen ist, bevor sie die Karte für Roaming aufs eigene Netz lassen.

Die EU hatte im vergangenen Jahr nach langen Debatten beschlossen, die Roaming-Gebühren bis Sommer 2017 komplett abzuschaffen. In Deutschland sind die Netzbetreiber schon dazu übergegangen, ihre Tarife um die Nutzung im EU-Ausland zu erweitern.

Liebes Heise-Team: Hier ist Euer Artikel verlinkt: http://www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/Aus-fuer-Roaming-Gebuehren-EU-macht-Vorschlag-fuer-Fair-Use-3314269.html

Virales Marketing: Erfolg durch Ansteckung

Viralmarketing-Virus-Internet
Wer seinen Facebook-Account öffnet, findet jeden Tag mindestens ein witziges, trauriges, spannendes oder faszinierendes Video, das von einem Freund geteilt wurde. Man selbst ist wiederum so begeistert davon, dass man ebenfalls auf Teilen klickt und den Inhalt damit unter einer neuen Gruppe von Leuten verbreitet. Und so geht es immer weiter… Wenn ein Unternehmen virales Marketing betreibt und damit einen Erfolg erzielt, verbreitet sich die Botschaft wie ein Lauffeuer durchs Netz. Wie der Name es schon sagt, gleicht es einem Virus, der sich von Mensch zu Mensch überträgt. Was so vielversprechend klingt, funktioniert allerdings nur, wenn man die Menschen erreicht, sie berührt und diese den Inhalt aus freien Stücken weiterverbreiten. Worauf es beim viralen Marketing ankommt…

Traditionelles Marketing versus virales Marketing

Traditionelles Marketing richtet sich an klassische Medien wie Fernsehen, Radio oder auch Print-Medien. In Zeiten von Facebook und Co. verliert es aber immer mehr seine Bedeutung – schon die Masse der verbreiteten Werbebotschaften ist hier so hoch, dass viele Menschen sie gar nicht mehr wahrnehmen oder sogar bewusst auslassen. Jeder kennt es: Wird der Spielfilm wieder einmal durch Werbung unterbrochen, zappen wir lieber quer durchs Programm. Sehen wir in einer Zeitschrift eine Werbeanzeige, blättern wir weiter und vergessen sie.

Virales Marketing geht anders an die Konsumenten heran: Es basiert auf der freiwilligen Verbreitungvon Informationen und Botschaften, jeder einzelne wird sozusagen selbst zum Werbeträger. Dabei gilt: Ist der Virus von hoher Qualität, wird er auch verbreitet – schnell und kostenlos, wodurch sich eine virale Kampagne für Unternehmen vielfach bezahlt machen kann.

Die Werbebotschaften beim viralen Marketing folgen dabei einem bestimmten Erfolgskonzept: Sie sind emotional, behandeln Themen, die eine möglichst breite Masse betreffen und haben nicht den aufdringlichen Beigeschmack, der klassischer Werbung oft anhaftet.

Virales Marketing gibt es in verschiedenen Formen

Wie andere Marketingmaßnahmen kann auch das virale Marketing unterschiedliche Formen der Kommunikation für sich nutzen. Die häufigsten dabei sind:

  • Videos
  • Fotos
  • Blogbeiträge
  • Podcasts

Die beliebteste und gleichzeitig auch die bekannteste Form sind Videos, in denen das Werbeobjekt zwar kurz erwähnt wird – das Hauptaugenmerk liegt aber auf dem Storytelling. Diese Geschichte ist es, die das virale Marketing so erfolgreich machen kann. Oder eben auch nicht, wenn der erhoffte Effekt ausbleibt.

Viraler Content zieht die Aufmerksamkeit der Betrachter regelrecht an, er versetzt in Erstaunen, bringt zum Lachen, informiert, schockiert oder begeistert. Kaum jemand kann sich ihm entziehen – ein Virus, der schnell und effektiv verbreitet wird.

Virales Marketing: Diese Elemente gehören dazu

Einzelne Elemente des viralen Marketings sind auf unterschiedliche Bedürfnisse und Emotionen des Konsumenten ausgerichtet. Das Ziel dabei ist aber am Ende immer dasselbe: Die Menschen sollen angeregt werden, über eine Marke, ein Produkt oder auch eine Person zu reden und die Inhalte untereinander zu teilen. Klassische Mundpropaganda.

Zum viralen Marketing gehören dabei mehrere Elemente, die voneinander unterschieden werden:

  • Pass-along: Das Weiterreichen ist der Kern jeder viralen Marketingkampagne. Beim Pass-along wird die Werbebotschaft als solche erkannt und ohne weitere Aufforderung durch die Betrachter mit anderen geteilt. Für Unternehmen ist dies besonders wertvoll, da eine riesige Verbreitung ohne weitere Kosten erreicht werden kann.
  • Incentivised viral: Eine direktere Form des viralen Marketing, bei der dem Konsumenten ein Bonus für eine bestimmte Handlung versprochen wird. Dieses Marketingelement ist nicht nur darauf ausgerichtet, eine bestimmte Reichweite zu erlangen, sondern im besten Fall auch eine dauerhafte Beziehung zum Kunden zu knüpfen. Dazu gehören zum Beispiel Rabatte oder die Teilnahme an Gewinnspielen, wenn der Inhalt geteilt wird oder ein Bonus, wenn man einen Freund anwirbt.
  • Undercover: Bemerken Konsumenten die Werbebotschaft nicht bewusst, spricht man vomundercover Marketing. Dies kann beispielsweise der Fall sein, wenn scheinbar alltägliche Menschen ein Produkt benutzen und anpreisen, obwohl es sich dabei eigentlich um bezahlte Profis handelt.
  • Buzz: Hier geht es darum, Gerüchte zu streuen um ins Gespräch zu kommen. Diese Vorgehensweise ist allerdings nicht die Angenehmste und im schlimmsten Fall mit hohen Risiken verbunden.. Das Ziel dabei ist, so viel Aufmerksamkeit wie möglich zu bekommen – jedes Mittel ist dabei willkommen, nach dem Motto: Schlechte Publicity ist besser als keine Publicity.

Virales Marketing: Die Vorteile

Virales Marketing bietet einige Vorteile, vorausgesetzt der Virus trifft den Nerv der Zeit und wird entsprechend in den sozialen Netzwerken verbreitet.

Hier ein Überblick:

  • Ökonomisch: Der vielleicht größte Vorteil für Unternehmen. Der Inhalt verbreitet sich völlig kostenlos und erzielt dabei oft eine Reichweite, von denen andere Maßnahmen nur träumen können. Viraler Content erreicht ohne Probleme mehrere Millionen Klicks und wird tausendfach geteilt.
  • Persönlich: Virales Marketing hat eine höhere Glaubwürdigkeit, da die Inhalte oft von Personen weitergegeben werden, die man gut kennt und denen man vertraut. Es entsteht nicht das Gefühl, man würde durch Werbung manipuliert werden.
  • Langwierigkeit: Der langfristige Effekt des viralen Marketing ist ein häufiger Kritikpunkt. Viele glauben, dass kaum ein Nutzen bleibt, nachdem der erste Hype verflogen ist. Tatsächlich kann so aber die Bekanntheit langfristig gesteigert werden, wenn es gelingt, den viralen Hit mit der Marke zu verknüpfen.

Virales Marketing: 4 Regeln

mimagephotography/shutterstock.comWer glaubt, eine erfolgreiche virale Kampagne wäre leicht zu erstellen, liegt damit falsch. Dies zeigt sich schon daran, wie wenige der täglich millionenfach verbreiteten Inhalte tatsächlich viral werden. Es braucht gut durchdachte und vor allem innovative Ideen. Gerade das wird mit der Zeit immer schwieriger, denn gerade im Internet gibt es kaum etwas, dass man noch nie gesehen hat.

Zu erfolgreichem viralen Marketing gehört also mehr, als nur Content zu erstellen und diesen auf eine Social-Media-Plattform zu laden. An diese vier Regeln sollte man sich halten, um die Chancen zu erhöhen:

  • Emotionalität

    Viral verbreitet werden Inhalte, die berühren und Gefühle vermitteln, die man mit anderen teilen möchte. Neutraler oder emotionsloser Content wird es schwer haben, sich durchzusetzen, da er weniger Menschen anspricht.

  • Leichte Verbreitung

    Damit virales Marketing funktionieren kann, muss es so leicht wie möglich sein, den Inhalt zu verbreiten. Ein einfacher Klick sollte dafür ausreichen, wie es in sozialen Medien möglich ist. Verzichten sollte man auf unnötige Anmeldungen, um Zugriff auf ein Video oder ein Bild zu erhalten.

  • Einzigartigkeit

    Ein solcher Virus funktioniert nur ein einziges Mal, anschließend werden Konsumenten immun. Es bringt daher nichts, eine andere virale Kampagne nachzuahmen. Wer keine eigene Idee hat, steht meist ohnehin nur als schlechte Kopie des Originals da.

  • Geschwindigkeit

    Virales Marketing funktioniert rasant, innerhalb weniger Stunden und Tage hat scheinbar das halbe Internet bereits davon erfahren. Dabei sollte allerdings darauf geachtet werden, dass dieVerbreitung nicht ins Stocken gerät. Es ist kaum möglich, den Inhalt zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt noch einmal ins Rollen zu bringen.

http://karrierebibel.de/virales-marketing/