Schlagwort-Archive: vmware

Martin Casado who sold his startup for $1.26 billion tells grads to ‚get good at‘ failure

Martin Casado is a legend in his corner of the tech world for inventing a technology that radically alters the way computer networks are built.

He invented the tech while he was a doctoral student at Stanford. He took that invention and two of the professors advising him, Nick McKeown from Stanford and Scott Shenker from the University of California, Berkeley — legends in their own right — and founded a startup. It was called Nicira, and it was backed by venture capitalists like Andreessen Horowitz’s a16z.

„Nicira launched into the networking industry like a cannonball hitting placid water,“ Marc Andreessen, the founder of a16z, wrote of Nicira and of Casado. That’s true.

The company was quietly founded in 2007 but didn’t officially launch until early 2012. Five months later, it sold to VMware for a stunning $1.26 billion. And the network industry has never been the same.

After staying with VMware for a few years, Casado left in early 2016 to become a VC with a16z. But the interesting thing is that he doesn’t think of himself as a runaway success, but as someone who got good at failure.

Or so he told the 2017 graduating class at his first alma mater, Northern Arizona University, where he spoke after receiving an honorary doctorate on May 13.

„When I was standing where you are, I wanted to be the world’s best computational physicist,“ Casado told the crowd. „And soon after, I wanted to be the world’s foremost cyber-policy expert. But instead, I went to grad school, and then I wanted to be the world’s best academic. And I certainly didn’t accomplish that.“

He added: „I only found computer science because I couldn’t hack it as a physicist and then I failed as a microbiology student. I made many, many missteps as the first-time founder of a company.“

Casado’s speech was short, sweet, funny, and profound.

Casado is considered the father of SDN.VMware

I heard it because I was in the audience that day, proudly watching my daughter graduate with a degree in astrophysics. (Notice how I slipped in that motherly brag?) While I’m insanely proud of my kid, I’m also biting my nails over what her degree will lead to.

She doesn’t want to go to grad school right now. And although she knows forms of math that I didn’t even know existed, what kind of career will she have? I don’t know, and neither does she.

But Casado’s speech flipped my view on it. He offered four solid bits of advice to students, which is good advice for anyone, at any age.

1. ‚You’re unlikely to achieve your goals.‘

No one can predict the future, and when you’re on the path to a goal, a better goal „is likely to smack you while you’re looking the other way,“ Casado said, „and you’d be an idiot not to follow it.“

His advice is to „take some fraction of that effort and work on being open to change and to opportunity“ while working toward your goals.

If he hadn’t been open to change in his career, he may never have invented an industry-changing technology.

2. ‚You are going to fail. A lot. It’s inevitable.‘

He suggests that it is failure, not progress, that indicates whether you are living up to your potential.

If you are failing, you are pushing yourself and „not stalling your own progress by hiding,“ he said.

The true skill, then, is „to learn to embrace failure — not only embrace failure, get good at it, and by that I mean get back up, apply what you’ve learned, and hit reset.“

3. ‚No one really knows what contributes to success.‘

Every person is unique, and that means what’s right for another isn’t always right for you. When it comes to advice, listen to the parts that ring true for you and disregard the rest.

„You’re going to take one path out of an infinite number of possibilities,“ Casado said. „And you’re going to navigate it your way.“

4. ‚The universe is a messy place.‘

If there is a secret to life, happiness, and success, it’s this: „The opportunity is hidden in the sloppiness. If you hold too hard to specific ideas of where you want to go, or what the landscape will look like, or what the world will provide you, I can guarantee you’ll be disappointed.“

Here is the full transcript of his speech. The video is below if you’d rather listen.

„Graduates, I am deeply honored to have a few minutes with you. So let me first thank you for the opportunity and your attention.

„Right now, this moment is one of the most significant inflection points in your life. And perhaps not in the way you’d expect. So if you’ll indulge me, I’d like to explain why.

„Getting to this point, this space we’re all sharing right now, has taken a tremendous amount of work and dedication, no doubt. And for that, I applaud you, and you have my deepest respect.

„However, a university education, no matter how windy, is a path with a clear goal. It was challenging, sure. Yet generally the objective was pretty obvious: work hard and get the hell out.

„All of that is about to change.

„Almost two decades ago I was standing where you are now. I was nervous. I was excited. And I was largely over it.

„And so I took that proverbial step. And very quickly, I realized that where I landed was very, very different from where I left.

„It was as if I stepped off of a narrow path and into a city. And unlike my university experience, there was no clear goal. There wasn’t a defined string of classes or tests I had to pass. There was no notion of a start or finish.

„Instead, there was a vast, vast collection of opportunities and perils — infinite routes to infinite locations, and none of which I really understood. You could choose to stop or move at any time with equal chance of benefit or loss.

„And I found that none of my experiences really prepared me to navigate such a wide open space. There were no platitudes, no cliches, no quippy one-liners that provided clear and useful guidance. It wasn’t just about working hard and setting goals. It wasn’t just about perseverance or having a positive attitude. I knew how to do all those things. This new space required something far different.

„So with that backdrop, I’d like to offer you some advice — lessons that no one would be able to put on a motivational poster and keep their job, lessons to keep in mind as you take this next step into the chaos.

„First: You’re unlikely to achieve your goals. Really, it’s very unlikely. When I was standing where you are, I wanted to be the world’s best computational physicist. And soon after, I wanted to be the world’s foremost cyber-policy expert. But instead, I went to grad school, and then I wanted to be the world’s best academic. And I certainly didn’t accomplish that.

„You’re unlikely to achieve your goals. The reason is that you probably don’t realize how many amazing opportunities are out there and how much you’ll enjoy them. You are unlikely to achieve your goals, because a better one is likely to smack you while you’re looking the other way, and you’d be an idiot not to follow it.

„So my guidance to you is as much as you work toward your goals, take some fraction of that effort and work on being open to change and to opportunity.

„Second: You are going to fail. A lot. It’s inevitable. I only found computer science because I couldn’t hack it as a physicist and then I failed as a microbiology student. I made many, many missteps as the first-time founder of a company.

„You are going to fail because you’re going to be navigating a shifting landscape with a lot of things not under your control. You’re going to fail because the goals are going to change or be unclear. You’re going to fail because you’ll start something and realize it’s not what you want to do.

„And here’s the key: Failing will be your only true measure of progress. It’s inevitable. The system you’re about to walk into is simply too dynamic and too poorly defined for you not to.

„And so my guidance to you is to learn to embrace failure — not only embrace failure, get good at it, and by that I mean get back up, apply what you’ve learned, and hit reset.

„Third: No one really knows what contributes to success. Not me. Not some business guru or some pundit on the news. No one. And that’s particularly true for your success — yours. Here’s the reality: Every one of you is a beautiful collection of amazing qualities and strengths. Unique in all the universe you. And you’re going to take one path out of an infinite number of possibilities. And you’re going to navigate it your way.

„So right here, I grant you permission to summarily ignore the nonsense of others. Take advice as input, sure, but check it against your absolutely unique perspective and qualities to bring to a problem.

„You do you, boo.

„For what it’s worth, of all the advice I’ve given you, this last request will probably be the most difficult. I know you can work hard. I know you’re all smart and capable and resourceful. But I don’t know how well you know yourself. I certainly didn’t when I graduated. And it took a lot of inquiry and a lot of failure and a lot of false starts to begin to figure it out.

„In the words of Dr. Seuss, that he actually didn’t write and I totally made up, ‚You can’t do you, boo, if you don’t know you.‘

„OK, let me take a step back. Here’s where all of this is leading.

„The universe is a messy place. And the real trick going forward is to acknowledge that and to embrace it. The opportunity is hidden in the sloppiness. If you hold too hard to specific ideas of where you want to go, or what the landscape will look like, or what the world will provide you, I can guarantee you’ll be disappointed.

„And it’s exactly because the beauty is in the chaos. What have I asked of you?

One, focus on being open to change, because although you’re all beautiful and bright and creative individuals, the opportunities are for more wondrous than you can possibly conceive.

„Two, fail. It’s the only way you know that you’re riding the chaos and are not stalling your own progress by hiding.

„Three, no one knows what’s best for you, because really, it’s unknowable. So ignore the pundits and do it your way.

„And to do that, know yourself. Because really, this journey is for you. And your priorities. And for those you care about. With that, I’ll leave you with a quote, and this one I didn’t make up.

„It’s from the Ashtavakra Gita:

Let the waves of the universe
rise and fall as they will.
You have nothing to gain or lose.
You are the ocean.

„Thank you very much, and again, many congratulations.“

http://www.businessinsider.de/vc-martin-casado-advice-grads-get-good-at-failure-2017-5

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Open Adoption Software (OAS) is The next wave in software

here’s a big shift happening in how enterprises buy and deploy software. In the last few years, open technology — software that is open to change and free to adopt — has gone from the exception to the rule for most enterprises. We’ve seen the IT stack redrawn atop powerful open-source projects, with developers opting for an “open-first” approach to building solutions. More than 78 percent of enterprises run on open source and fewer than 3 percent indicate they don’t rely on open software in any way, according to a recent market survey by Black Duck Software.

Redrawing Enterprise IT Stack

Openness is a near truism in the Valley, but today projects like Hadoop, Cassandra, Docker and Mule are infiltrating even the most conservative and dogmatic organizations. As such, startups like Cloudera, DataStax and MuleSoft are generating hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue each year from real enterprise customers by selling proprietary, value-added products around their open projects.

This is a new wave in software — one that’s not only displacing incumbent markets, but creating entirely new ones. We call these Open Adoption Software (OAS) companies, and we believe they’re primed to build meaningful businesses — and drive large economic outcomes.

We’re witnessing a big shift in how software is consumed.

OAS companies are constructed differently. They go through three phases of company building: Project, Product and Profit. Companies built atop this “3Ps” model need to look largely the same and be held to similar financial standards as traditional enterprise software businesses by the time they make it into the “Profit” phase. We discussed this a few weeks back in a panel conversation with startups and financial analysts — a timely conversation, as some of these companies reach the scale to potentially IPO. This feels an awful lot like 2003, just before the first SaaS companies started going public.

OAS is a customer-driven phenomenon

Open software has already rooted itself deep within today’s Fortune 500, with many contributing back to the projects they adopt. We’re not just talking stalwarts like Google and Facebook; big companies like Walmart, GE, Merck, Goldman Sachs — even the federal government — are fleeing the safety of established tech vendors for the promises of greater control and capability with open software. These are real customers with real budgets demanding a new model of software.

And the drumbeat is only getting louder. Each year we host 15 Fortune 500 CIOs as part of Accel’s Tech Council, and we continue to hear criticism about proprietary software (“expensive, slow to change”). Here are a few trends we identified that are driving customers toward this new model:

  • The Need for Speed and Control: The demand for innovation and rapid delivery means enterprises need agility from the software they adopt. Nothing is worse than waiting for a vendor to update a library when you’re trying to stick to your release schedule. Open platforms allow companies to move faster and integrate at a deeper level without fear of lock-in by removing the dependency on proprietary vendors. Enterprises are no longer beholden to a vendor’s product roadmap — they can innovate to their own requirements at any time.
  • Everything is Web Scale: Enterprises are delivering solutions to a global, ever-connected base of users. Consider banks that support tens of millions of end users logging into their banking apps and hundreds of thousands of employees worldwide. Traditional, proprietary vendors are unable to deal with this onslaught of data and user scale. Fortunate for them, many early web 2.0 leaders (Google, Facebook, Linkedin, Yahoo) dealt with these problems and more, contributing much of their learnings to the open community.
  • Developer Power and Network Effects: CIOs are empowering frontline developers to download and adopt the projects they need to drive innovation. Developers are looking to community-led technologies where they adopt, deploy and meaningfully participate. OAS extends beyond Moore’s Law by also benefitting from something akin to Metcalfe’s Law: its energy and rate of innovation grows exponentially with the developer networks around it. Open software can absorb learnings and requirements far faster than a proprietary vendor, while simultaneously hardening security and stability. Open software is in many respects, much safer. Hadoop and Docker are constantly stretched, pushed, molded and smoothed by their developer communities — they’re far more mature than their age would suggest.

All of this is to say: We’re witnessing a big shift in how software is consumed. OAS is openly adopted and openly developed, and is quickly becoming a dominant model for how enterprises build and deliver IT.

While most OAS companies have at least some amount of freely available or open-source components, open source and OAS should not be conflated. Open source describes a software development methodology, whereas OAS pertains more to a go-to-market and company-building philosophy. OAS is not about cheaper alternatives to proprietary on-premise software. It is about creating new markets more so than displacing incumbents. It’s innovative, it’s developer-driven and it’s the next wave of software adoption.

The next wave of software

With each successive wave of technology — from mainframe to client-server to ‘X’aaS (IaaS, SaaS, etc.) to OAS — software has gotten progressively easier to adopt. Therefore, adoption has happened faster and has reached a broader audience than the wave before it.

Waves of Software Adoption

Each wave is driven by the democratization of some facet of technology. In the shift from mainframe to client-server, computers became accessible. In the shift to ‘X’aaS, hosting and WAN connectivity became accessible. Now, with the shift to OAS, developer community innovation has become accessible. OAS not only represents a new way to provide innovative functionality, but is a delivery model innovation for developers.

Through it all, the customer desire for bigger, faster and cheaper offerings remains constant. The technological innovations that each wave brings facilitate change in how software is packaged and delivered so that customers can gain some form of efficiency or cost savings.

Being openly adopted is not a panacea.

With all of these shifts, industry pundits predicted that the new wave will commoditize existing categories. While some layers of the stack do get cheaper, consumption on the layer above consequently expands dramatically as more applications are developed and new use cases emerge. This new usage outpaces any commoditization. Thus, the value of the market opportunity expands rather than contracts. Salesforce and Amazon Web Services (AWS) exemplify this. Literally thousands of new businesses exist as a result of these platforms than ever could have in the past.

OAS is not an answer to all problems

While OAS companies drive adoption much faster than their fully proprietary counterparts, being openly adopted is not a panacea. Particularly as public cloud vendors begin hosting open-source projects as a service, it’s tremendously important that these companies thoughtfully decide which parts of the product will be open and which parts won’t. There is definitely a unique failure mode in which OAS companies go too open and fail to monetize sufficiently.

While we certainly believe in OAS, not all open projects are the basis for OAS companies, and not all of these companies are going to be publicly traded — some will be niches, some will struggle, some will be M&A opportunities. It’s hard to predict the winners out of the gate. While OAS companies will likely have the same success rate as traditional software companies, there is reason to believe that the winners will be bigger than their predecessors.

The next wave in software is open adoption software