Archiv für den Monat Dezember 2016

Cyber Attacks get worse in 2017

cyber-attack

Image Credit: SWEviL/Shutterstock

It was speculated 2016 would see even more cybersecurity activity than 2015, and it did not disappoint. Consider the $81 million stolen from Bangladesh Bank, the 500 million accounts swiped from Yahoo, or the 19,000 emails leaked from Democratic Party officials in the run-up to the election. Not to mention the IoT-powered botnets launching record-breaking DDoS attacks that have brought down major parts of the Internet.

But, in reality, this year’s cyber-attack headlines offer just a glimpse of a cyber war between hackers and security personnel that is being waged on a grand scale every day. More than anything, they are harbingers of worse to come.

Here are some of the escalated challenges we will face in 2017.

1. Attackers won’t just steal data — they will change it

Today’s savvy attackers are moving away from pure data theft and website hacking to attacks that have a subtler target: data integrity. They will use their ability to hack information systems not just to make a quick buck but also to cause long-term, reputational damage to individuals or groups through the erosion of trust in the data itself.

In the past six months alone, we’ve seen attacks like the DNC and Yahoo breaches, which focused on influencing political and economic public opinion, rather than simply gaining a profit. And the hackers aren’t done yet – the Russian group thought to be behind the election-related breaches is moving on to Germany’s elections next, according to a recent statement.

The scenario is particularly worrying for industries that rely heavily on public confidence. In fact, data from the analysis of SEC disclosures found 83 percent of publicly traded companies worry most about risk of brand damage via hacks. But it’s not just them. A laboratory that cannot vouch for the fidelity of medical test results, or a bank that has had account balances tampered with, are examples of organizations at particular risk. Governments, as pointed out above, may also suffer significant damage from such attacks, as critical data repositories are altered and public distrust in national institutions rises.

We’re also seeing this kind of manipulation at smaller scale. For example, we were deployed in a manufacturing firm that used biometric scanners to restrict access to their machinery and industrial plants. We noticed an unusual Telnet for a biometric scanner that was hooked to the corporate network. After further investigation, we found that legitimate data was being altered – quite possibly to add new fingerprints. This type of manipulation, had it not been detected early, would have have let attackers right in through the front door.

While some of the recent breaches and the result of this year’s U.S. presidential election may seem straight out of a movie, tomorrow’s cyber-attacks will make it harder than ever to parse fact from fiction.

2. Consumer devices will be held for (cyber) ransom

Ransomware, like Cryptolocker, has plagued companies around the world — experts reckon these attacks have increased fivefold in 2016 alone. They encrypt critical files at a speed that is virtually impossible to keep up with and leave companies facing hefty fees for their release.

Hospitals have suffered particularly at the hands of ransomware attacks. They are prime targets, as they have become digital jungles full of everything from life-saving medical equipment and critical patient records to patient devices and staff computers — all with cyber defenses that have failed to keep pace. The result is organizations that pay up. Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles paid the equivalent of $17,000 in Bitcoin to extortionists after its computers were taken offline for over a week.

In 2017 and beyond, we will start to see the beginning of a new type of extortion on a micro level, as consumers are targeted across a range of connected objects. Imagine getting home and turning on your smart TV only to find that cybercriminals are running a ransomware attack on your device. Would you pay $50 to unlock it? Or what if the new GPS system in your car got hacked when you were late for a meeting — how much would you pay to unlock it?

3. Artificial intelligence will be a weapon

Artificial intelligence is exciting for many reasons — self-driving cars, virtual assistants, better weather forecasting, the list goes on. But attackers will use AI to wield highly sophisticated and persistent attacks, attacks that blend into the noise of busy networks.

We have already seen the first glimpses of attacks going this direction in automated polymorphic and metamorphic malware. Polymorphic malware, which changes its attributes mid-attack to evade detection, has reinforced the obsoleteness of signature-based detection methods. It self-learns and understands its environment and network before choosing its next action. Automation has also been a major factor in the resurgence of ransomware. We can anticipate that artificial intelligence threats will be similar. Imagine a piece of artificially intelligent malware sitting silently on a network, observing its surroundings and learning how to disguise itself. If it understands how to completely blend in with the background noise of a network, could it ever be detected?

The next generation of AI-powered attacks to emerge will use customized code to emulate the behaviors of specific users to fool even skilled security personnel. This includes the ability to craft sophisticated and bespoke phishing campaigns that will successfully dupe even the most threat-conscious employee.

Earlier this year, we were deployed in a charity in California for a proof-of-value. One day, a receptionist received an email containing a fake invoice, supposedly coming from a stationary supplier known to the company. The receptionist opened the attachment, as she recognized the company, and typically handled many invoices per day. As soon as she clicked the attachment, her computer immediately connected to a server in Ukraine and downloaded a malware that rapidly began encrypting files. This will only get worse with “smart” malware driving attacks specifically tailored for their victims.

Next year’s attackers can see more than your social media profile. They’ll know that your 10 a.m. meeting with your supplier is being held at its new headquarters. At 9:15 a.m., an email with the subject line “Directions to our office” arrives in your inbox, apparently from the person you are meeting, as you get off the train. Do you click the map link in the email?

 

http://venturebeat.com/2016/12/11/heres-how-cyber-attacks-get-worse-in-2017/

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15 quotes from self-made billionaires that will change your outlook on money

From investor Warren Buffett to tech mogul Jeff Bezos, here’s what some of the world’s richest men and women have to say about money.

“My goal was never to just create a company. A lot of people misinterpret that, as if I don’t care about revenue or profit or any of those things. But what not being just a company means to me is not being just that — building something that actually makes a really big change in the world.” —Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook

“My goal was never to just create a company. A lot of people misinterpret that, as if I don't care about revenue or profit or any of those things. But what not being just a company means to me is not being just that — building something that actually makes a really big change in the world.” —Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook

REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

“When a small business grows like eBay did, it has a multiplier effect. It creates other small businesses that supply it with intellectual capital, goods and services.” —Meg Whitman, CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise

“When a small business grows like eBay did, it has a multiplier effect. It creates other small businesses that supply it with intellectual capital, goods and services.” —Meg Whitman, CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise

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„I will tell you how to become rich. Close the doors. Be fearful when others are greedy. Be greedy when others are fearful.“ —Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway

"I will tell you how to become rich. Close the doors. Be fearful when others are greedy. Be greedy when others are fearful." —Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway

Mario Tama/Getty Images

„There are very few people in the world who get to build a business like this. I think trading that for some short-term gain isn’t very interesting.” —Evan Spiegel, CEO of Snap Inc., on not selling to Facebook

"There are very few people in the world who get to build a business like this. I think trading that for some short-term gain isn’t very interesting.” —Evan Spiegel, CEO of Snap Inc., on not selling to Facebook

Steve Jennings/Getty

„The reason I’ve been able to be so financially successful is my focus has never, ever for one minute been money.“ —Oprah Winfrey, business magnate

"The reason I've been able to be so financially successful is my focus has never, ever for one minute been money." —Oprah Winfrey, business magnate

Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images

“And I think the more money you put in people’s hands, the more they will spend. And if they don’t spend it, they invest it. And investing it is another way of creating jobs. It puts money into mutual funds or other kinds of banks that can go out and make loans, and we need to do that.” —Michael Bloomberg, CEO of Bloomberg LP

“And I think the more money you put in people's hands, the more they will spend. And if they don't spend it, they invest it. And investing it is another way of creating jobs. It puts money into mutual funds or other kinds of banks that can go out and make loans, and we need to do that.” —Michael Bloomberg, CEO of Bloomberg LP

REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

„If we were motivated by money, we would have sold the company a long time ago and ended up on a beach.“ —Larry Page, Google cofounder and CEO of Alphabet Inc.

"If we were motivated by money, we would have sold the company a long time ago and ended up on a beach." —Larry Page, Google cofounder and CEO of Alphabet Inc.

Kimberly White/Getty Images

„I think frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints do. One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to invent your way out.“ —Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon

"I think frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints do. One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to invent your way out." —Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon

Chip Somodevilla/Getty

“You always hear the phrase, money doesn’t buy you happiness. But I always in the back of my mind figured a lot of money will buy you a little bit of happiness. But it’s not really true.” —Sergey Brin, Google cofounder and president of Alphabet Inc.

“You always hear the phrase, money doesn’t buy you happiness. But I always in the back of my mind figured a lot of money will buy you a little bit of happiness. But it's not really true.” —Sergey Brin, Google cofounder and president of Alphabet Inc.

Steve Jennings/Getty Images

„Today, making money is very simple. But making sustainable money while being responsible to the society and improving the world is very difficult.“ —Jack Ma, executive chairman of Alibaba Group

"Today, making money is very simple. But making sustainable money while being responsible to the society and improving the world is very difficult." —Jack Ma, executive chairman of Alibaba Group

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

“Money makes you more of who you already are.” —Sara Blakely, founder of Spanx

“Money makes you more of who you already are.” —Sara Blakely, founder of Spanx

Paul Morigi/Getty

“I’m a bit tight with money, but so what? I look at the money I’m about to spend on myself and ask myself if IKEA’s customers can afford it… I could regularly travel first class, but having money in abundance doesn’t seem like a good reason to waste it.. If there is such a thing as good leadership, it is to give a good example. I have to do so for all the IKEA employees.” —Ingvar Kamprad, founder of IKEA

“I'm a bit tight with money, but so what? I look at the money I'm about to spend on myself and ask myself if IKEA's customers can afford it... I could regularly travel first class, but having money in abundance doesn't seem like a good reason to waste it.. If there is such a thing as good leadership, it is to give a good example. I have to do so for all the IKEA employees.” —Ingvar Kamprad, founder of IKEA

Heribert Proepper/AP

“The financial markets generally are unpredictable. … The idea that you can actually predict what’s going to happen contradicts my way of looking at the market.“ —George Soros, investor and chairman of Soros Fund Management

“The financial markets generally are unpredictable. ... The idea that you can actually predict what's going to happen contradicts my way of looking at the market." —George Soros, investor and chairman of Soros Fund Management

AP Photo

“I believe that you have to understand the economics of a business before you have a strategy, and you have to understand your strategy before you have a structure. If you get these in the wrong order, you will probably fail.” —Michael Dell, CEO of Dell Inc.

“I believe that you have to understand the economics of a business before you have a strategy, and you have to understand your strategy before you have a structure. If you get these in the wrong order, you will probably fail.” —Michael Dell, CEO of Dell Inc.

Jack Plunkett/AP Images for Dell, Inc.

“I never thought about becoming wealthy. It never crossed my mind. What really motivated me was to try to accomplish something.” —Sheldon Adelson, chairman and CEO of Las Vegas Sands Corporation

9 Steps to Get Millions of Views on Your YouTube Channel

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YouTube is the second most powerful search engine on the planet, and holds the top spot as the largest video network in existence.

The video site continues to grow more pervasive with the maturation of smartphone technology. Today, half of YouTube video views stem from mobile devices.

For this reason, and many others, YouTube is the master of reaching across generational boundaries to impact and engage members of GenX, GenY and GenZ. For example, YouTube currently reaches more 18-34 and 18-49 year-olds than any U.S cable network currently broadcasting.

Because of the popularity of the platform, influencers have spawned from the network and continually leave lasting impressions on their dedicated viewers. Studies suggest that recommendations from influencers are trusted 92% more than from celebrities or advertisements.

The trust factor brought forth by influencers is one of the most notable reasons as to why influencer marketing is so effective.

It’s not as simple as it looks

Leveraging influencers on YouTube is not as simple as it sounds. Because there are many performance and brand risks associated with YouTubers that need to be managed in order to deliver rockstar results.

YouTubers are legitimate masters of their craft and make their living by presenting themselves authentically. This means that brand interference regarding their voice or image is not normally welcomed.

Despite the challenges, brands and YouTubers can get along famously when the right partnership is forged.

The balancing act

By way of example, Google recently recruited famed YouTube influencer Lewis Hilsenteger from the channel Unbox Therapy to help make some noise about Android Pay.

The video depicted Lewis travelling throughout New York City, visiting destinations that accept the form of payment to prove that you could survive solely with Android Pay. This is a prime example of recruiting an influencer that expresses a brand’s message while maintaining their authenticity.

The video generated 1.7 million views while showing off the real-world capabilities of Android Pay.                     

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No doubt successful collaborations like these and the significant revenue generation potential spurred Google to recently acquire influencer marketplace Famebit.

The 9 key steps to get millions of views on YouTube

Below you’ll find nine steps that fast-casual restaurant chain Qdoba Mexican Eats took when engaging the YouTube audience for the first time.

The results were phenomenal (and, in full disclosure, delivered under the direction of, as well as executed by digital marketing agency Evolve!, Inc.).

If you’re planning on diving into YouTube to help grow your business, use this campaign as a model – it delivered 3 million views, 84K social engagements, and 200M potential impressions, all while adhering to strict brand guidelines and beating aggressive price targets.

1. Set your goals and success criteria

As with any marketing campaign, align your influencer marketing campaign with your overall marketing and sales goals.

Define success using quality metrics, such as messaging and how the brand is portrayed, as well as quantifiable targets such as cost per video view, average length of video view, number of targeted views, and cost per conversion.

2. Set a budget

The cost per view charged for YouTube sponsorships varies WIDELY, depending on factors such as audience size, reach, demographics, engagement, their industry vertical and genre, the type of sponsorship and length of integration, the YouTuber’s desire to work with a particular brand, and whether the talent is represented by an agency.

A good rule of thumb is to target a .04 – .07 cents cost per view (CPV) for video integrations and a .08 to .15 CPV for dedicated videos.

Brands should also set aside budget for content generation (landing pages, blog posts, prizes and and/or promotions), analytics software for tracking, a promotional ad budget, and manpower.

3. Create a theme and campaign messaging that supports your goals

It can be something as simple as capturing people’s excitement as they try delicious Qdoba entrees for the first time (#QdobaUnbox), or reveling in the occasions when More is Better (#MoreIsBetter), including indulging in Qdoba’s generous array of delicious toppings (#MoreFlavorIsBetter).

Evolve even created a contest celebrating Qdoba’s key differentiating factor: Free Guacamole (#FreeGuac).

Develop brand, and campaign-specific messaging, but leave ample room for YouTubers to exercise their creative license.

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Remember, integrations are NOT advertisements.  Videos that come off as too commercial tend to get panned in the comments and generate lower-than-expected view counts.

4. Establish your selection criteria

What constitutes a brand match?

Start with genres, industries and channel demographics, including age, sex and geography.

Does the campaign theme fit their interests? Do they create content that would resonate with or offend your audience?

Identify any influencers that meet this criteria, fall within the audience size that you are looking to engage, and begin the outreach process.

5. Develop a pitch letter

Be clear about the campaign requirements, and set expectations: Are you looking for an integration or a dedicated video?  What four or five key messages do YouTubers need to address in the video?  And what is your timeline?

Basically, what are the promotional requirements and is there any additional information you need from them when they respond to your proposal.

But bear in mind that people who have built sizeable, engaged followings can afford to be choosy about which brands they want to work with. You may want to excite them with something that’s unique about your brand.

Qdoba offered vloggers a summer of free food, in addition to the paid sponsorship.

6. Recruit enthusiastic YouTubers

This is perhaps the most time-consuming step, and the most critical to the success of your campaign.

You know you’ve hit gold when you’ve identified YouTubers who meet your brand criteria, like your brand and offer creative story lines, and sometimes bonus promotions in their response.

There are 3 routes to recruit YouTubers:

  • Outreach directly to the people you want to work with via the email listed on their YouTube channel
  • Work with talent agencies you know and trust
  • Solicit proposals through influencer marketplaces like Famebit, Grapevine Logic or Reelio

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7. Spell out everything in the contract

Flush out the creative before finalizing the contract, and include the type of integration, key messages, project timeline, the reviews process and video promotions.

YouTubers tend NOT to want the brand to weigh in on things like the Video Title or storyline outside the integration. On the same token, it is vital to be somewhat flexible when working with influencers on the creative direction of the content. These folks have built substantial followings that are enchanted by their unique voice. Setting too rigid of a structure that is outside the norm for influencers could result in a deal going south or a video not receiving the attention it deserves.

8. A/B test everything. Measure, tweak and repeat

Test various genres, campaign themes, messaging, calls to action, and amplification strategies. At this stage, we generally prefer to partner with YouTubers that have small but engaged audiences. This will allow you to get the most bang for your buck while simultaneously minimizing any potential losses for creatives that do not resonate with audiences.

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Measure campaign performance, focusing on actual video views, social engagements and cost per conversions, if that’s relevant. Pivot as needed and update projected outcomes.

We use several tools simultaneously, including Simply Measured, to monitor multiple channels to gain the most clear and comprehensive picture possible.

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9. Scale!

Once the campaign has been optimized, turn up the volume. Contract larger YouTube channels, and consider using contests or launching several videos at once to support product launches.

These introduce an added layer of complexity because they need to adhere to strict timelines and you potentially need to manage multiple videos at once. On the flipside, they also generally produce much more significant results, so while efforts will become more intricate, they will also become much more fruitful.

Qdoba A/B tested several concepts before running a two week #FreeGuac campaign, which drove 2.4 million video views. Participating YouTube vloggers invited their viewers to enter into a scavenger hunt contest for the chance to win cash prizes, free food and cool SWAG.

Contests like these are ideal for scaling a campaign as almost any marketing element that engages an audience on a participatory level is going to garner more attention compared to content that is merely observed through comments and shares. The contest subsequently resulted in Qdoba collecting over 10K contest submissions.

Wrap

As video continues to grow, YouTube is quickly transitioning into the premier influencer marketing channel. The power of video content is unmatched by its predecessors and influencer marketing, when managed properly, has the ability to permeate and engage an audience in unparalleled fashion.

The most challenging aspect of this discipline is that the rules of engagement are constantly in flux, meaning that for the best results, it is advisable to collaborate with specialty digital marketing agencies that work day-in and day-out crafting influencer strategies on YouTube that resonate, sell, and make a brand’s efforts worthwhile.

9 Steps to Get Millions of Views on Your YouTube Channel

Will IBM be your AI and machine learning platform?

Here’s how IBM got its start in artificial intelligence, and what it brings to the table for your business or organization.

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IBM CEO Ginni Rometty and IBM Watson Group Senior VP Mike Rhodin.

Image: IBM

Of all the tech giants throwing their weight behind artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, few receive the kind of attention garnered by IBM. After its seminal Jeopardy win in 2011, IBM Watson became synonymous with technologies such as cognitive computing and AI.

Upon losing to Watson, former Jeopardy champion Ken Jennings famously wrote „I, for one, welcome our new computer overlords“ under one of his responses. All of a sudden, Watson was a household name, igniting conversations about what could be accomplished with AI.

While Watson is a major part of IBM’s approach to AI solutions, it’s only a piece of the puzzle. Here’s a deeper look at the bigger picture, so businesses can determine if IBM is the right AI vendor for their needs.

The history

IBM Research, the company’s research division, dates back to 1945, when it opened the Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory at Columbia University. IBM’s work in AI began in the 1950s, according to its website. Around that time, an IBM employee named Arthur Samuel wrote a self-learning program for playing checkers, and would later be recognized as a pioneer in AI and machine learning.

In the 1970s, IBM built its first robot, and advanced its work in the field in the 1980s with the IBM RS 1. In the 1990s, IBM Researcher Gerry Tesauro used reinforcement learning (RL) to create a self-learning game of backgammon. Then, in 1997, IBM’s Deep Blue computer famously beat World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov at chess.

The company’s development of actual AI products began more recently. Mike Gualtieri, of Forrester Research, said that IBM’s journey toward AI solutions began in 2009, when it acquired two companies: ILOG and SPSS. ILOG is a business rules engine, Gualtieri said, which used to be called an expert system, while SPSS provides advanced analytics. Both of these purchases helped jumpstart IBM’s work on AI solutions for businesses.

Today, IBM’s AI initiatives are centered around the Watson platform. IBM has Watson solutions for analytics and machine learning, data search and discovery, and conversation tools like chat bots.

The vision

IBM views AI as „augmented intelligence,“ said Guru Banavar, vice president and chief science officer for cognitive computing at IBM Research. To take that concept a little further, 451 Research analyst Nick Patience explained augmented intelligence as „AI — and machine learning in particular — acting as a force multiplier for humans.“

Currently, Banavar said, there are „thousands“ of engineers working on the Watson platform. On a high level, the team is split into two very distinctive camps. One on end of the spectrum is a group working on „very concrete, commercial development and deployment,“ which happens usually on a weekly, monthly, or quarterly basis.

„Then, at the other end of the spectrum, we have teams of people that are working on advanced new technologies — some of which are being invented — all the way up to mathematicians who are developing the underlying techniques for them,“ Banavar said.

After Watson won Jeopardy, Banavar said the team at IBM was focused on building custom systems for specific clients or industry niches. However, they recently had to make a conscious strategic decision to move away from that model to focus on APIs.

Banavar said that IBM realized it wouldn’t be possible to build out all of the applications they wanted to with their existing strategy. So, they turned some of their capabilities into a platform with open APIs, „in order to attract and nurture a larger ecosystem of developers that can build many applications that IBM cannot build by ourselves,“ Banavar said.

Those APIs are being put to use in areas like retail, finance, law, and even fantasy football. But healthcare is one of the primary focuses for Watson solutions.

„I could see a vision where every hospital, every clinical group, had this Watson service. It becomes as essential as an X-ray, as essential as an MRI,“ Gualtieri said. „So, I think that’s their vision. They’re putting a lot against that.“

Strengths

To understand whether or not IBM would be a good fit for your organization, you must weigh your company’s needs against IBM’s strengths. On the technical side of things, Banavar said, these strengths start with Watson’s language capabilities.

„Watson has image processing capabilities, speech processing capabilities, regular numerical data analytics capabilities across the board — we have the entire spectrum,“ Banavar said. „But, if you ask me what is a really unique, and probably the most advanced, capability in Watson, it is language processing.“

When it comes to business, IBM’s AI strength comes from three key elements: IBM Research, its acquisition prowess, and its consultants.

IBM Research may not always produce a breakthrough, but it does give the company a distinctive edge, said Gualtieri. „The advantage of that is that the largest companies in the world — who IBM wants to sell to — want that edge,“ he added.

The ability to acquire the right companies to broaden its portfolio of offerings is a key differentiator for IBM. Banavar noted that the company has also been leveraging open-source libraries and toolkits to make use of new techniques in neural networking, word embedding, and more.

In addition to its research prowess and acquisition budget, IBM has a large network of consultants. According to Patience, that is key, „because a lot of the early machine learning opportunities involve taking enabling technologies such as machine learning algorithms and turning them into enhanced business processes and applications; something IBM understands well.“

Challenges

One of the biggest challenges facing IBM is managing the expectations that come from terms like cognitive computing and AI. This is further compounded by the public-facing nature of Watson, especially in the wake of its Jeopardy win, and confusion around the capabilities of AI as well.

„Everyone thinks that we’re on the verge of Star Trek, like next week,“ Gualtieri said. So, IBM must have a grand and transformative vision about the future of AI, but they also have to keep the expectations in check so customers don’t regret moving forward, Gualtieri noted.

On the question of safety and ethics, many would share Gualtieri’s view that the technology „is not even close to getting to the point where ethical issues are really a serious concern.“ However, Banavar said that ethical challenges are still something the IBM team must consider.

The first crucial issue that must be addressed, Banavar said, is the idea of explainability. If a doctor or financial advisor uses Watson to make a decision, for example, they must be able to understand why Watson chose a particular solution or set of options.

The other ethical consideration is bias. With machine learning systems, the models are built with training data — but the data has to faithfully represent what you’re trying to model, or it could be biased, Banavar said. Because of that, selecting the proper training data set is an ethical decision of the utmost importance. This is made even more important by how broad a potential impact Banavar sees for AI technologies.

„At the end of the day, I do think that cognitive computing is necessary for us to solve the world’s big problems,“ Banavar said.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/should-ibm-be-your-ai-and-machine-learning-platform