Archiv für den Monat Juli 2016

The tyranny of messaging and notifications

Welcome to Mossberg, a weekly commentary and reviews column on The Verge and Recode by veteran tech journalist Walt Mossberg, now an Executive Editor at The Verge and Editor at Large of Recode.

Up until just a few years ago, I got around 350 emails a day, which presented me with an exhausting, time-consuming daily task that I grumbled about plenty. Now, because of social media and messaging services, that number has been cut by more than half. But things are actually worse.

These days, messages come at me from so many directions that it’s incredibly distracting and even harder to deal with. Friends, co-workers, business acquaintances and strangers contact me on multiple siloed services, which can signal subtle shades of immediacy or weight. And when I have to reach someone with something important and time-sensitive, I often wind up resorting to two or more similar but independent pathways, because I’m never sure which one will be likelier to work, since he or she is under a similar assault.

And then there are the notifications, ever-present on every operating system on every device. Sure, you can fine tune or even silence them with some work (more on that later), but most people don’t, or don’t know how, or feel they don’t dare. Notifications are supposed to save you time, but often they wind up doing the opposite.

Many mornings, it’s common for the lock screen of my iPhone and the right-hand side of my Mac’s screen to be jammed with notifications about „news“ I don’t care about, messages whose relevance has come and gone overnight, tips on birthdays of people I’m not close to, reminders of meetings I’m not attending, and warnings of traffic tie-ups on roads I don’t use. The signal-to-noise ratio is very poor, and gets only marginally better during the work day.

The confusion will only grow

And this weird, mixed-up communications structure is about to get more complex, because U.S. tech companies — following a strong trend in Asia — are turning messaging from a service into a platform, with supposedly intelligent bots and assistants and apps built into them. Apple is beefing up iMessage. Facebook is beefing up Messenger. Google, which has been behind in messaging, is launching two new platforms: Allo for text and images and emojis, and Duo for videos.

Maybe these bots and assistants and apps will be a means to controlling and focusing your messaging and communications, but that would be a hard, tricky job. More likely, I fear, they will just spew more messages and notifications they think — wrongly — you care about.

Alongside the race for consumer loyalty among these giants, there’s a parallel race to become the new-style internal messaging system for companies. In the lead so far is Slack, an unthreaded, sometimes chaotic series of chat rooms which my employer, Vox Media, uses, and which claims to be the fastest-growing business application on the market. Microsoft and others are trying to catch up. Slack is just another thing you have to keep up with.

I don’t know about you, but I expect to be pretty cautious about committing to Google’s new Allo service, once I’ve tried it out. Other new services inspire similar caution. All due respect to the smart folks at Google, but I’m just not sure I can handle yet another messaging service in my life.

Stop! Attention thief!

Sometimes, I yearn for the old days of email dominance (I can’t believe I typed those words). Why? Because despite the spam, you could be pretty sure you were good if you just checked it a few times a day, since most people used it as their primary means of written communication and they usually didn’t expect an immediate response.

A text, or short internet message, on the other hand, seems to demand instant attention, and may even lead to a whole thread of conversation. This can sometimes be delightful or enlightening, but it takes you away from the moment — from your thinking, reading, working. It steals your attention at a time of the sender’s choosing.

Even social network posts can act like this. You might be succeeding — for a while at least — in staying away from Facebook or Twitter while you work on a project or think through a problem. But then somebody acts on one of your posts, or even on a post you merely commented on, and boom! There’s a notification nagging at you. This happened to me as I was writing this column, because I forgot to kill notifications for awhile.

And, of course, a tweet or Facebook post can spawn a whole, sometimes heated, conversation that’s hard to ignore, even if you’re not browsing your whole feed for news or amusing GIFs.

The rabbit holes are everywhere, and it’s too easy to fall down them.

Dumb and dumber

One reason for the messaging overload, especially when it comes to notifications, is that too many apps just have no idea what’s relevant to you, or don’t care. For instance, I signed up for a local text alert service to get notified of things like dangerous storms on the way or bad road conditions, But I’m on the verge of shutting it off because it floods me with texts about anything worse than a fender bender on roads I never travel. It knows nothing about my driving habits and offers no way to teach it. Then, it compounds the distraction by texting me again when the irrelevant traffic tie-up is cleared.

Starbucks notifies me when I’m near one of its branches where I buy a lot of coffee. But the notification remains on my Apple Watch long after I’ve left the vicinity of that store. CVS notifies me of sales, when I really don’t care and I only wanted to know if my prescription is ready.

And to make some of these apps smarter, I might have to give up more of my personal information, which is a dangerous balance — especially when dozens of these apps start asking for it.

The big solution?

It would be nice if, like most email services, these major and forthcoming messaging services could somehow interoperate in the same client of your choice, so they could all somehow learn your preferences and you could use a single scheme of settings and preferences to control their behavior (maybe you could „snooze“ them) and their notifications. But that seems highly unlikely.  Palm’s webOS operating system had a feature something like this called Synergy, but it’s defunct.

So the big fix to this is probably up to the makers of the operating system platforms. They permit and control the notifications, at the least. They could create more and better user tailoring and learning that could be shared by all messaging services. But the problem, of course, is that the two big mobile OS makers, Apple and Google, are also deeply enmeshed in the messaging wars.

The small, available solution

So, what can you do? Well, you can be like me and vow to stick with one or two messaging services, turn off all notifications when need be, and, at times, when it really matters, put your mobile devices into airplane mode for an hour here and there, even on the ground.

Or, you could carefully tweak your notifications on iOS and Android. For instance, if you have an iPhone, you could open your Notification settings and go through the long list of apps you own, decide if you want notifications from each, and then, if so, what types of notification (sounds? lock screen snippets? A badge? one of two types of banners?)

And then, you could dive into the preferences on Facebook and Twitter, and quiet the notifications that stem from threads in which you are involved.

This might do the trick, but, if you’re a power user, it’s a daunting task. It’s like that vow you make, but never keep, to devote a bunch of time to paring down your list of Facebook friends.

A shorter, simpler list of steps outlined here should help.

But none of the excitement and energy around messaging as a new platform will go anywhere if managing the flow of messages is more trouble than they’re actually worth.

http://www.theverge.com/2016/7/6/12102874/walt-mossberg-messaging-notifications

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What Millennials Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us About Success

Millennials are made for entrepreneurship. They are the generation that can teach us about dreaming big, doing good, and making their own rules.

Opinions about the Millennial workforce are easy to come by, and they range from bright predictions about their role in the future of franchises to the key to motivating them and even a list of reasons to stop „hating“ on this diverse group.

Though Millennials are often criticized by preceding generations for their attitudes in the workplace, whether those perceptions are accurate or not is debatable. For example, one study by IBM found that Millennials have largely similar values and attitudes about work as older generations, with existing disparities attributable to age differences.

However, there are qualities that make this generation uniquely suited for success as entrepreneurs. Here are 10 traits that give Millennials an edge in starting a business.

1. They aren’t willing to wait.

The Deloitte 2016 Millennial survey found that 25 percent of Millennials would have no hesitation in leaving their current employer in the next 12 months, and 44 percent didn’t expect to remain with their current employer after two years. This suggests that Millennials are not willing to stick around with an organization that isn’t fulfilling their desires, which is often the impetus for starting a business.

2. They have a strong sense of „why not.“

This generation has seen debilitating recessions and „too big to fail“ entities go bust. Entering the workforce in unstable economic times – or attempting to do so and not finding work – has given them a level of fearlessness about striking out on their own.

3. They are idealistic.

They don’t believe a business should exist solely to make money, but should contribute something meaningful to the world. They judge a company not by its profitability but by higher-minded ideals such as the quality of its products and services, employee satisfaction, customer service, even environmental impact. This sense of mission can help motivate entrepreneurs to persevere through the ups and downs of running a business.

4. They are immersed in the digital world.

As this generation has grown up, technology has constantly been evolving around them. As a result, they are not only familiar with the possibilities and opportunities of the online world, but it is ingrained into their lives, unlike any previous era. Using online platforms to forge connections with others or to pursue new ideas is as routine as breathing.

5. They are true to their personal values.

They are willing to stand up for what they believe in. In fact, approximately half of those surveyed by Deloitte say they have refused to do work that went against their personal value or ethics. This strong moral compass and sense of integrity is helpful when building their own business brands.

6. They are waiting longer to marry and start a family.

Only 26 percent of Millennials are married, compared to 36 percent of Generation Xers and 48 percent of baby boomers when they were in the same age range. This means that Millennials are willing and able to devote the time that starting a business requires.

7. They expect control over their careers.

More than 77 percent of Millennials feel their career paths are in their own hands. That means they take responsibility for forging their path instead of feeling that they don’t have control over their professional destinies, a critical mindset for entrepreneurs.

8. They place a premium on relationships.

Business owners know the importance of building relationships with others, from customers to vendors to the wider community. Millennials place a similar value on interpersonal relationships – just check out the number of people they are connected to on social media.

9. They are easily bored.

Growing up online has exposed them to a world of ideas and interests that’s instantly available at their fingertips – literally. As a result, they are prone to follow their passions and have little tolerance for mind-numbing boredom on the job. They insist that work be both stimulating and inspiring. The challenge and excitement of entrepreneurialism that allows them to pursue their interests can be a lure.

10. They are determined to succeed.

In the same way, they’ve witnessed today’s celebrities start out as homegrown YouTube sensations or college dropouts becoming Internet billionaires; they have a sense that anything is possible. They are willing to dream big and leverage their knowledge and passion for turning those dreams into reality.

http://www.inc.com/diane-gottsman/what-entrepreneurial-millennials-can-teach-us-about-success.html

App UIs Are All Starting To Look The Same. That’s Not A Bad Thing

Welcome to digital Pleasantville.

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Over the past several months, some innovative design leaders have taken minimal design to the next level. Facebook, Airbnb, and Apple have followed a similar blueprint to simplify prominent products in a way that reflects the trend of complexion reduction (CR) in mobile design.

WHAT THE HELL IS „COMPLEXION REDUCTION“?

You’ve never heard of complexion reduction, you say? Well yeah, that’s because I just made it up. It’s a trend that is beyond flat design, beyond minimal design, and independent of progressive reduction. Some may claim that it’s just the next step in minimal design—the inevitable result of designing for small screens that have little room for visual flourish—but I think it’s something more distinct. There are specific similarities and characteristics that define this new trend:

  • Bigger, bolder headlines
  • Simpler more universal icons
  • Extraction of color

The result? The user interfaces of some of our favorite apps are starting to look more and more like they could all be housed under the same brand.

THE PROOF

I first started taking notice of this trend in early May when Instagram released its redesigned UI.

Some of the changes included removing much of the blue and dark gray color used throughout the app, making headlines bolder, and simplifying the bottom navigation and icons. What was left was a black and white UI with bold headlines where the content shined and functionality was clear. I appreciated the less cluttered interface and was reminded a bit of a platform I have been an admirer of for quite some time: Medium. Medium has been rocking the black and white since launch in 2012, and has reduced clutter with each redesign since, effectively making Medium one of the originators of complexion reduction.

Shortly after the folks over at Facebook unveiled Instagram’s look, I opened up the Airbnb app and was struck by how familiar it looked. This was my first time browsing the app since the company released a redesign in April, yet I felt like I had seen it all before.

Airbnb’s redesigned UI didn’t get nearly the media coverage of Instagram’s redesign a month later (partly because it wasn’t accompanied by a shiny new app icon) but it followed many of the same CR tactics.

The mobile redesign introduced larger, bolder headlines, removed unnecessary imagery and color, and simplified the icons to make them more universally recognizable. What was left was a very black and white UI where the content shined and functionality was clear.

Apple is the latest example of complexion reduction. Last month at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference, the tech giant announced a number of exciting things for consumers to look forward to, including the release of iOS 10, which Apple is dubbing, „The biggest iOS release ever!“ (or at least since iOS 8 which was referred to as . . . „The biggest iOS release ever„).

One particular announcement caught my eye. That was the redesign of Apple Music. While the most important aspects of the redesign are UX updates and additional features, the aesthetic was the first thing I noticed. Caitlin McGarry, a staff writer at Macworld, described the updated appearance well, „It’s a totally new look, with giant cards, bigger and bolder fonts, and a clean white background that allows the album art to shine.“

Sound familiar? The design differs slightly from the blueprint used by Instagram and Airbnb (They use solid icons! What the heck Apple?) but the key elements are there: large bold headlines, black and white UI.

SO WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?

As I mentioned earlier, this means more and more of your favorite apps are going to start looking like one another. Why? Much like the NFL, tech is a copycat league. These redesigns were met with generally positive reviews (some people are complaining about a „lack of personality“ in these new black and white UIs but they’ll soon get over that. You open an app for it’s functionality, not it’s personality) so I expect apps both new and old to start jumping on the CR bandwagon.

This means your iPhone home screen will soon become nothing more than a colorful mosaic of bright portals transporting you to Pleasantville.

Now, whether you are for or against this monochromatic fad, it is undoubtedly a sign of progress. The product design process is advancing and evolving from the old segmented approach that encouraged superfluous design to a more holistic process that is truly focused on the user. In the old product design process, a UI designer may be handed wireframes by a UX or product person with the instructions „make it pretty.“ The designer would then spend hours or days adding color, removing color, changing color when the best solution may have been right there in front of them all along . . . the wireframes! As the lines between UX and UI design blur in today’s more integrated design process, designers become less worried about their specific responsibilities (like making it pretty) and focus on the ultimate goal of creating the best product for their user.

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3061616/app-uis-are-all-starting-to-look-the-same-thats-not-a-bad-thing

Legendary car designer Henrik Fisker wants to build a self-driving car

 

Fisker Force 1 SideThe Force 1. VLF Automotive

Legendary car designer Henrik Fisker launched his comeback with the Force 1 in January — a $230,000 luxury sports car.

But Fisker isn’t planning on stopping with the Force 1. He’s already designing the next car to sell under his new company, VLF Automotive, based in Detroit. And the car designer is interested in pursuing electric cars again and ones with autonomous features down the road.

„What is the next vehicle out there in terms of electric cars and autonomous driving?“ Fisker told Tech Insider. „I’m spending a lot of time in that area and what that means in the future.“

Fisker said he’s interested in designing electric cars, as well as vehicles with autonomous features, but he declined to comment on whether or not he would ever actually pursue either one.

Before the Force 1, Fisker got his name in the car industry as a designer for BMW, Ford, and Aston Martin. He did initial design work for the Tesla Model S sedan. But when he broke off to design a hybrid dubbed the Fisker Karma, Tesla filed a suit alleging he copied some of Tesla’s technological innovations for the Karma.

An arbitrator eventually ruled in favor of Fisker. But Fisker Automotive went bankrupt in 2011, making the Karma a distant memory. Although Fisker Automotive went bankrupt, the Karma is a big reason Fisker is interested in entering the electric car market.

A new kind of electric car 

„I’m passionate about it because when I brought out the Fisker Karma, it was clear people thought, ‚Well, an electric car, even with a range extender, can be sexy and amazing,'“ he said. „Obviously, we had a major battery problem and that’s what brought Fisker Automotive down. But today we have the battery technology that has gone a lot further.“

Fisker said he wants to design a car that isn’t a traditional electric, four-door sedan. Fisker said he would want to „make a completely new car, with new proportions and a different design.“

„We still haven’t seen any cars take advantage of the electric powertrain in terms of how you proportion an electric vehicle versus traditional vehicles,“ he said. „Yes there’s electric cars, but they haven’t really done it in a beautiful way.“

Fisker would also want the electric car to „truly move the needle,“ he added.

That sounds similar to what secretive, electric car start-up Faraday Future is going for. Faraday Future teamed up with Aston Martin to make „a range of next-generation connected electric vehicles.“

Faraday Thumb21Faraday Future’s concept car. Rob Ludacer

The start-up is also using a Variable Platform Architecture (VPA) — a modular platform designed specifically for electric vehicles. The technology allows the chassis to be easily adjusted by changing the lengths of the rails and other structures:

modular

Using a VPA allows Faraday Future more flexibility in designing a variety of cars.

Autonomous cars will completely change car design

Electric powertrains, though, aren’t the only technology reshaping car design.

Fisker said that autonomous cars excite him because they open up all kinds of new opportunities for new ways to design a car.

For example, self-driving vehicles allow car makers to totally rethink the interior design of a vehicle. Fisker didn’t give specifics, but we’ve seen automakers experiment with building sofasand TVs into the interiors of autonomous cars.

„No one right now has any particular advantage in this space because no one has done it before. No one truly understands what the consumer wants,“ he said. „I just generally think the technology is enabling new ventures to take a new shot of what a car is.“

So when could we see a car from Fisker with autonomous features? Fisker is remaining hush on the subject.

„I’m definitely thinking about it,“ he said. „And it’ll probably be in the next two to three years that we’ll see the biggest changes in the car industry, maybe ever.“

http://www.businessinsider.com/henrik-fisker-interest-in-autonomous-electric-cars-2016-7

How to Develop and Retain Millennial Leaders

It’s happened: Millennials (by most definitions, those born between 1980 and the late 1990s) are now the largest generation in the U.S. workforce. And they’re no longer the generation waiting in the wings to become leaders—they’re already increasingly entering senior and managerial positions.

 The New Guard: How to Develop and Retain Millennial Leaders

Along with this influx of young managers comes a shift in the role of manager itself. Managers are no longer only focused on making sure work gets done, but also on how and why it gets done. They are expected to be detail-oriented and strategic, to build culture and ensure productivity. And their position is also pivotal for employee engagement: A recent Gallup poll found that managers accounted for 70% of variance in employee engagement.The good news? This new generation appears up for the challenge. But companies must also find ways to develop and retain these new managers. Recent data released in the 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey points to evidence that companies will have to make significant changes in how they develop this generation to meet the challenges that managers will face in the future.

Millennials are a dynamic generation. They are less likely than their predecessors to remain in one organization for a long period of time. They are looking for more flexible work hours, and look for organizations whose culture reflects caring towards both employees and the world around them. They aren’t afraid to leave a job if they feel their skills are not utilized or their principles are not matched.

Preventing this exodus of potential leaders has become a business-critical challenge for organizations. According to the Deloitte survey, of the Millennials likely to leave their organizations in the next two years, 71 percent are unhappy with how their leadership skills are being developed.

Getting talent development right will be crucial both for retaining this generation of managersand flipping the switch on engagement for the rest of your workforce. Here are the major shifts that need to take place:

1) Deliberately devote more time to developing leadership skills.

Deloitte found that the most loyal Millennials experience high levels of support and/or training for pursuing and managing leadership roles. Take a look at the volume of opportunities available for young managers to develop their leadership skills. Are there programs in place? Are young managers encouraged to pursue these opportunities? Is there explicit encouragement to experiment with new skills once they return from these programs? Setting aside the time and resources for leadership development shows a commitment to young managers and is likely to get commitment in return.

2) Leadership development programs should reflect the preferences of the generation: more collaborative, team-based, and decentralized.

The Millennial preference for creative, inclusive cultures over authoritarian ones extend from their work days to professional development opportunities themselves. Some development programs rely on the knowledge of a leadership “guru” speaking at the front of the room and passing on knowledge to a captive audience. This generation’s preferences, however, suggest that a program can be designed where participants experience more collaborative problem-solving and autonomy to decide how and what they need to learn. Even those programs that don’t portend to be spouting knowledge from one single person into the awaiting minds of managers may need to shift in the direction of more flexible and collaborative.

3) Weave mentorship into the fabric of your culture and your development programs.

An oldie but a goodie, mentorship still makes a difference. Not only will Millennial managers need mentorship to learn the skills and political know-how that long years of tenure used to ensure, but they’ll also be more likely to stay with the organization. According to Deloitte, respondents who planned to stay with their companies for more than five years were twice as likely to have a mentor. Programs and cultures that make mentorship a deliberate and important component have a better chance of retaining this new generation of managers.

4) Social impact activities can become team building opportunities and arenas to practice leadership skills.

Why not combine the Millennial desire to join businesses that understand their impact with their need to develop skills that will help them as leaders? Embed a volunteer experience or an activity that gives back to the community in some way into your company’s strategy to develop young leaders. Not only will you show a commitment to your community (something that this generation looks for), but you will also provide a concrete learning experience for participants to look back on as leaders.

5) Develop skills for dialogue to enable Millennial managers to enact the work culture they seek.

In terms of employee engagement, good communication from managers is essential. Leaders in talent development are already honing in on communication skills as one of the most importantdevelopment opportunities for managers of the future. The role of translator and psychologist that middle managers often need to play are well served by a capacity for communicating well with employees. Skills for dialogue – active listening, powerful questioning, and personal engagement – can be developed via collaborative learning experiences and encouraged around the workplace. If dialogue becomes the norm, Millennial managers will start to build the culture they seek and contribute to their organizations in a very meaningful way.Millennial managers are poised to fill the leadership gap left in the wake of waves of baby boomer retirements, and the impending challenge is to both retain and develop these fresh leaders. Organizations will need to make adjustments for this generation or risk losing talent that no longer accepts the principle of long-held tenure or hierarchical advancement. As this generation ages, we may see just how different leadership looks. For now, it’s crucial to provide the right opportunities and climate for that new style to grow.

http://www.business2community.com/human-resources/new-guard-develop-retain-millennial-leaders-01586250

The 15 coolest concept cars revealed this year so far

Automakers are pushing bold, innovative ideas forward with their latest concept cars.

Faraday Thumb23Rob Ludacer

Whether it’s a car with nothing inside but a sofa and TV or an electric car resembling the Batmobile, concept cars give us a glimpse of how technology will shape the future of driving.

1. Volkswagen unveiled a microbus concept meant to give a modern spin to the classic Volkswagen bus at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.

1. Volkswagen unveiled a microbus concept meant to give a modern spin to the classic Volkswagen bus at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.

Volkswagen

Called the BUDD-e, the electric car gets up to 373 miles of range.

The doors open with a simple wave of the hand, and you can control the console’s interface by making hand gestures.

The doors open with a simple wave of the hand, and you can control the console's interface by making hand gestures.

Volkswagen

You can also use the interface to control things like the temperature and lighting in your house.

2. The big unveiling to come out of the Consumer Electronics Show was Faraday Future’s concept car, the FFZERO1.

2. The big unveiling to come out of the Consumer Electronics Show was Faraday Future's concept car, the FFZERO1.

Rob Ludacer

It can go from zero to 60 miles per hour in under three seconds.

Four motors placed over each wheel give the car a top speed of 200 miles per hour. It’s also capable of learning the driver’s preferences and automatically adjusting the internal settings.

Four motors placed over each wheel give the car a top speed of 200 miles per hour. It's also capable of learning the driver's preferences and automatically adjusting the internal settings.

Faraday Future

Although Faraday Future plans to release a production car in 2020, the FFZERO1 is just a show car.

3. LeEco, a Chinese tech company, unveiled its Tesla killer concept car at the Consumer Electronics Show.

LeEco is also partners with Faraday Future.

Called the LeSEE, the car has a top speed of 130 miles per hour. It also has an autonomous mode.

Called the LeSEE, the car has a top speed of 130 miles per hour. It also has an autonomous mode.

LeEco

The steering wheel will retract back into the dashboard when the car is in autonomous mode.

4. The Lincoln Navigator concept car comes with giant gullwing doors. It was unveiled at the New York Auto Show in March.

4. The Lincoln Navigator concept car comes with giant gullwing doors. It was unveiled at the New York Auto Show in March.

Ford

We won’t be seeing those doors in the production model of a Lincoln Navigator anytime soon, unfortunately.

The six seats inside can be adjusted 30 different ways, and there’s entertainment consoles on the back of four seats so passengers can watch TV or play games.

The six seats inside can be adjusted 30 different ways, and there's entertainment consoles on the back of four seats so passengers can watch TV or play games.

Ford

There’s even a built-in wardrobe management system in the trunk so you can turn your car into part walk-in closet.

5. BMW’s Vision Next 100 was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in March. It comes with an AI system called Companion that can learn your driving preferences and adjust accordingly in advance.

5. BMW's Vision Next 100 was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in March. It comes with an AI system called Companion that can learn your driving preferences and adjust accordingly in advance.

BMW

The side panels of the Next 100 are made of carbon fiber.

The steering wheel will retract into the dashboard when the car is in autonomous mode.

The steering wheel will retract into the dashboard when the car is in autonomous mode.

BMW

There’s also a heads-up display that will show information about your route on the windshield.

6. BMW added to its Vision 100 line in June. Here we see the Mini Vision Next 100 that was built for ridesharing.

6. BMW added to its Vision 100 line in June. Here we see the Mini Vision Next 100 that was built for ridesharing.

BMW

The car can recognize who you are when it comes to pick you up and will greet you with personalized lighting.

The steering wheel will shift into the center of the console when the car is in autonomous mode.

The steering wheel will shift into the center of the console when the car is in autonomous mode.

BMW

The BMW also comes with a heads-up display that will show information about your route on the windshield.

7. The last addition to the BMW Vision 100 line is this futuristic Rolls-Royce.

7. The last addition to the BMW Vision 100 line is this futuristic Rolls-Royce.

Rob Ludacer

The Rolls-Royce is also completely autonomous.

Because the car envisions a completely autonomous future, the interior is composed entirely of a two-person, silk sofa and a giant OLED TV.

Because the car envisions a completely autonomous future, the interior is composed entirely of a two-person, silk sofa and a giant OLED TV.

Rolls-Royce

There’s also a secret compartment in the car for storing your luggage.

8. McLaren unveiled a stunning concept car called the 675LT JVCKENWOOD at the Consumer Electronics Show.

8. McLaren unveiled a stunning concept car called the 675LT JVCKENWOOD at the Consumer Electronics Show.

McLaren

The McLaren 675LT comes with a wireless networking system so it could communicate with other cars on the road about traffic and accidents.

The car comes with a steering wheel that looks like a video game controller!

The car comes with a steering wheel that looks like a video game controller!

McLaren

The controller is meant to help the driver control the heads-up display while in motion.

9. Italian automaker Pininfarina unveiled a beautiful hydrogen-powered concept car at the Geneva Motor Show.

9. Italian automaker Pininfarina unveiled a beautiful hydrogen-powered concept car at the Geneva Motor Show.

Pininfarina

The car, called H2 Speed, refuels in just three minutes.

It has a top speed of 186 miles per hour and can go from zero to 62 miles per hour in 3.4 seconds.

It has a top speed of 186 miles per hour and can go from zero to 62 miles per hour in 3.4 seconds.

Pininfarina

The car can regenerate energy from braking.

10. Audi unveiled its connected mobility concept car in April. There’s a longboard integrated in the bumper in case you want to roll from the parking lot to work.

10. Audi unveiled its connected mobility concept car in April. There's a longboard integrated in the bumper in case you want to roll from the parking lot to work.

Audi

It conveniently pulls out when you need it and is stored in the bumper when you’d rather travel on foot!

The car’s infotainment system can calculate the fastest route based on real-time data and will suggest using the longboard if that seems faster.

The car's infotainment system can calculate the fastest route based on real-time data and will suggest using the longboard if that seems faster.

Audi

It will even show you the best parking spot to make the longboard portion of your commute shorter.

11. Aston Martin showed off a beautiful concept car in May called the Vanquish Zagato Concept.

11. Aston Martin showed off a beautiful concept car in May called the Vanquish Zagato Concept.

Aston Martin

All of the body panels in the Vanquish Zagato are made of carbon fiber.

Aston Martin made the car with Italian auto design company Zagato. The two have worked together since 1960.

Aston Martin made the car with Italian auto design company Zagato. The two have worked together since 1960.

Aston Martin

There’s not too many details on this car since it’s just a concept, but it sure is pretty.

12. Jeep showed off a crazy looking wrangler in March at the Easter Jeep Safari, an off road rally.

12. Jeep showed off a crazy looking wrangler in March at the Easter Jeep Safari, an off road rally.

Chrysler

That is a monster car.

The Wrangler Trailcat concept had to be stretched to 12 inches to accommodate the massive engine providing 707 horsepower.

The Wrangler Trailcat concept had to be stretched to 12 inches to accommodate the massive engine providing 707 horsepower.

Chrysler

It comes with racing seats from a Dodge Viper.

13. Toyota unveiled a strange-looking concept car dubbed the uBox to appeal to Generation Z in April.

13. Toyota unveiled a strange-looking concept car dubbed the uBox to appeal to Generation Z in April.

Toyota

The uBox is all-electric.

The interior is entirely customizable so it can transform into a mobile office or fit more people.

The interior is entirely customizable so it can transform into a mobile office or fit more people.

Toyota

It also comes with a nice curved glass roof that lets plenty of light inside.

14. French automaker Renault showed off a stunning, high-tech sports car dubbed the Alpine Vision in February.

The Alpine Vision is a two-door, two-seater sports car.

It can go from zero to 62 miles per hour in 4.5 seconds

The interior is decked out with a LCD gauge cluster in the center console.

15. Lastly, Croatian automaker Rimac designed a stunning, all-electric concept car for the Geneva Motor Show.

15. Lastly, Croatian automaker Rimac designed a stunning, all-electric concept car for the Geneva Motor Show.

Rimac

Called the Concept_One it can accelerate from zero to 62 miles per hour in just 2.6 seconds.

The Concept_One can reach a top speed of 185 miles per hour.

The Concept_One can reach a top speed of 185 miles per hour.

Rimac

It has a regenerative braking system that allows it to generate energy whenever it brakes.

http://www.businessinsider.com/coolest-concept-cars-revealed-in-2016-2016-6

Closing Apps to Save Your Battery Only Makes Things Worse

battery_life

http://www.wired.com/2016/03/closing-apps-save-battery-makes-things-worse