Schlagwort-Archive: Start-Up

These 15 startups didn’t exist 5 years ago — now they’re worth billions

Silicon Valley can create immense value in just a short time. Just look at these 15 startups that didn’t even exist five years ago, which are now valued at $1 billion or more, according to venture capitalists.

zooxZoox’s cofoundersZoox

For the purposes of this list, Business Insider asked PitchBook Data to pull a list of US-based companies that were founded in 2012 or later — since we’re nearing the end of 2016 — and that are private tech companies with a valuation of north of $1 billion.

We then ranked them from least to most valuable based on their post-money valuations.

Here are the companies that achieved billion-dollar valuations in the last five years:

Cylance

Cylance

Cylance CEO Stuart McClureYouTube/Cylance

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $1 billion

Cylance built a product that uses artificial intelligence to analyze a file you’re about to open, determine if it’s malware, and then stop it from executing — all in less than a second. It solves the problem of email phishing scams, which are still a favorite method of hackers, and has over 1,000 customers, it says.

Cylance was founded by Stuart McClure and Ryan Permeh, two well-known names in security who are perhaps best known for their work at McAfee.

 

 

Compass

Compass

Compass

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $1 billion

While Compass functions like a traditional broker, the company’s promise is using technology to reduce the time and friction of buying and selling a house or apartment. In July, Compass released an app designed to replace „stale“ quarterly market reports with more dynamic information. In the app, buyers and sellers can search by standard things like neighborhood, number of bedrooms, price range, and so on. But they can also look at more advanced metrics, like year-over-year analysis of median price per square foot, days on the market, and negotiability.

 

 

Illumio

Illumio

Illumio CEO Andrew RubinIllumio

Founded: 2013

Valuation: $1 billion

In 2014, Illumio emerged from stealth. Six months later, it had already racked up a billion dollar valuation, thanks to its new approach to security.  The idea involves watching the applications themselves to make sure they aren’t doing anything they are not supposed to do, indicating a hacker or a virus. It places a tiny bit of code (called an agent) on every computer and operating system to watch all the apps. Companies can then install the software that watches the apps in their own data center, or they can hire Illumio’s cloud service to watch the apps for them. And then the security follows the app wherever it goes, even if an app moves from one server to another, or from the data center to a cloud computing service.

 

Carbon3D

Carbon3D

Carbon3D

Founded: 2013

Valuation: $1 billion

Carbon3D grabbed headlines and attention for its method of seemingly creating shapes out of a liquid resin soup.  It’s much more complicated than that, but Carbon3D has caught the eye of everyone from Ford to Johnson & Johnson. While Ford imagines a future of speedy customizable parts, like custom designed cup holders, healthcare operators are looking at Carbon3D for a fast way to create surgical parts.

The machines are already being tested less than a year after they launched. In April, it released its M1 printer.

 

 

Opendoor

Opendoor

Keith Rabois, chairman and cofounder of Opendoor

Founded: 2014

Valuation: $1.1 billion

Opendoor is betting that homeowners would take a guaranteed sale over a higher price. It calculates a fair market value and pays homeowners before re-selling the home with a 30-day satisfaction guarantee.

 

Uptake Technologies

Uptake Technologies

Getty Images/Bloomberg

Founded: 2014

Valuation: $1.1 billion

Former Groupon founder Brad Keywell started the secretive Chicago-based data analytics startup in 2014. Already it’s working with Caterpillar to be the analytics backbone of heavy industries like manufacturing, construction, rail, and more. Its sensors and data analysis should be able to help companies predict revenue and save money, according to Forbes.

Flatiron Health

Flatiron Health

Saskia Uppenkamp

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $1.2 billion

Flatiron Health is a software company that organizes the world’s oncology information and makes it accessible for doctors, patients, and researchers. In January 2016, Roche, one of the world’s leading pharmaceutical companies, made a $175 million investment in the company, which valued the company at $1.1 billion.

Zoox

Zoox

Tim Kentley-Klay and Jesse LevinsonZoox

Founded: 2014

Valuation: $1.55 billion

Despite remaining in stealth, Zoox has already raised $290 million for its unseen product. The only hint its founder Tim Kentley-Klay has given was at a conference in October when he described it as Disneyland on the streets:

“At Zoox what we’re creating…is not a self-driving car any more than the automobile is a horseless carriage. We’re not building a robo-taxi service, we’re actually creating an advanced mobility service,” Kentley-Klay said, according to the Wall Street Journal. “You can really think of it as Disneyland on the streets of perhaps San Francisco and that means a vehicle which is smart enough to understand its environment but it’s also importantly smart enough to understand you, where you need to be, what you want to do in the vehicle, and how you want to move around the city.”

 

 

Instacart

Instacart

Instacart

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $1.9 billion

Often dubbed „Uber for groceries,“ Instacart eliminates the need to ever set food in a grocery store. The service will deliver your full load of groceries, hand-picked by a personal shopper at local stores.

In 2016, the company deepened its relationship with Whole Foods after the grocery retailer invested in the company and signed a multi-year delivery contract.

 

 

Oscar

Oscar

Oscar CEO and co-founder Mario Schlosser, co-founders Kevin Nazemi and Joshua Kushner.Oscar

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $1.5 billion

Oscar founder Josh Kushner wants to transform the healthcare industry by creating a better user experience when it comes to health insurance. It launched publicly in 2013 to sell better insurance through Affordable Care Act marketplaces. Yet, the election of Donald Trump could spell trouble for the highly-valued startup, even though Kushner’s brother, Jared, is Trump’s son-in-law. According to Bloomberg, it’s still losing money as it looks to diversify away from Obamacare-only offerings — something Trump, a close family connection, seeks to repeal.

 

Quanergy

Quanergy

Quanergy

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $1.6 billion

Self-driving car startups aren’t the only billion-dollar bets around. Quanergy isn’t building its own car, but instead specializes in building LiDAR systems — the 3D sensing systems that self-driving cars use to the see the world. Already the startup has struck partnerships with vehicle-makers including Mercedes-Benz and Hyundai.

 

Blue Apron

Blue Apron

Blue Apron cofounders Matt Wadiak, Matt Salzberg, and Ilia PapasBlue Apron

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $2 billion

Blue Apron, a company that sends you portioned-out ingredients and recipes in a box, is a godsend for lazy cooks.

Though it’s only been around since 2012, Blue Apron has already generated more than $800 million in revenue in 2016, according to Bloomberg. However, it has put its IPO plans on hold as it works to decrease its customer acquisition costs and improve lifetime customer value, Bloomberg reported. Blue Apron’s potential is vast: The service appeals to millennials who want to expand their repertoire in the kitchen, as much as to busy moms straining for creativity and simplicity in their weeknight meals.

 

Avant

Avant

Avant CEO Al GoldsteinAvant

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $2 billion

One of two highly-valued Chicago startups, online lending company Avant targets subprime borrowers — people with lower credit scores. To date, the startup has given out more than 500,000 loans, totaling more than $3 billion.

 

Zenefits

Zenefits

Zenefits CEO David SacksREUTERS/Beck Diefenbach

Founded: 2012

Valuation: $2 billion

Zenefits‘ valuation took a haircut in 2016. The startup, once valued at $4.5 billion, experienced turmoil after it was discovered that its CEO had created a program designed to cheat state regulations. After installing a new CEO and launching Zenefits 2.0, the company also repriced its stock, shaving its valuation from $4.5 billion to a cool $2 billion — still a lot of money for a five-year-old company.

 

 

Pivotal Software

Pivotal Software

Pivotal CEO Rob MeeGlassdoor/Pivotal

Founded: 2013

Valuation: $2.8 billion

Pivotal sells a set of software tools and consulting services to help even the largest, most old-school companies build and develop software as if they were a tiny startup. Pivotal becomes their secret weapon as they turn to newfangled cloud computing and data-crunching technologies to stay competitive in a digital world. In May, Ford led a $253 million investmentin the company alongside Microsoft.

http://www.businessinsider.de/startups-didnt-exist-5-years-ago-worth-billions-2016-12?op=1

Advertisements

Lean Start-up: Wie man mit minimalem Risiko ein funktionierendes Unternehmen aufbaut

„Tipps, wie man mit minimalem Risiko ein funktionierendes Unternehmen aufzubaut

Der Silicon-Valley-Unternehmer Eric Ries ist der Begründer der „Lean Startup“-Bewegung und Autor des gleichnamigen Buchs. Konzept von „Lean Startup“ ist es, ein schlankes junges Unternehmen aufzubauen und dessen geringe Ressourcen effizient einzusetzen. Das Ziel: Mit minimalem Risiko schnell ein funktionierendes Unternehmen aufzubauen.

Unter Tech-Start-ups im Silicon Valley erfreut sich die Lehre heute großer Beliebtheit, und Ries selbst half dabei, die beiden erfolgreichen Start-ups There und IMVU nach dem Prinzip aufzubauen.

Aus dem Buch von Ries lassen sich auch einige Fehler ablesen, die viele Gründer nach Auffassung von Ries begehen.

1. Fehler: Management-Methoden eines Konzerns anwenden

Das Management eines großen Konzerns besteht im Wesentlichen daraus, Kennziffern für den Erfolg auszumachen und zu definieren, Pläne zu erstellen, wie sich die Kennziffern verbessern lassen und dann die Fortschritte der Pläne zu überwachen.

Auch Start-ups müssen Erfolgskennziffern definieren und die angestrebte Verbesserung überwachen – doch Pläne spielen dabei höchstens eine untergeordnete Rolle. Start-ups fehlt es an verlässlichen Erfahrungswerten, um ernsthaft planen zu können – sie bewegen sich in einem Umfeld voller Unsicherheiten. Ries rät daher, Start-ups sollten weniger planen und möglichst flexibel sein. Die richtigen Kennzahlen müssen gefunden werden – doch wie sie erreicht werden, das sollten Start-up am besten am echten Markt testen und nicht in Plänen mit Meilensteinen und Marktprognosen.

2. Fehler: Fokus auf die falschen Ziele

Das Ziel jeder Unternehmung muss es letztlich sein, ein Geschäftsmodell zu finden, das dauerhaft funktioniert. Laut Ries lassen sich zu viele Start-ups von diesem Hauptziel ablenken, da es oft andere Ziele gibt, die einfacher zu erreichen sind und dem Ego schmeicheln: Aufmerksamkeit in der Presse, hart und ausdauernd arbeiten oder möglichst ausgefeilte Meilensteinpläne zu erreichen, können nur Mittel zum Zweck sein und sind niemals Selbstzweck. Das alles muss sich dem Ziel unterordnen, wie ein Start-up Kunden gewinnt und Geld verdienen kann. Dazu muss das Unternehmen herausfinden, was die Kunden wollen und wofür sie zu zahlen bereit sind.

3. Fehler: Trockenübungen mittels Marktforschung statt Lernen durch echte Kunden

Trockenübungen mit Fragebögen und Fokusgruppen bringen nach Auffassung von Ries wenig. Stattdessen rät er zur Methode des validierten Lernens mit echten Produkten und echten Kunden – nach dem Vorbild des wissenschaftlichen Ansatzes: Hypothese formulieren, sie am Markt testen, anpassen und erneut testen. Nur wenn sich eine Hypothese als richtig erweist, hat das Start-up ein nachhaltiges Geschäftsmodell gefunden. Ries nennt das BML-Schleifen, bestehend aus den drei Phasen „Build, Measure, Learn“ – also Produkt bauen, messen, lernen. Jeder BML-Durchlauf bringt dabei Erkenntnisse – und je schneller die Phasen durchlaufen werden, desto schneller nähert sich das Start-up einem nachhaltigen Geschäftsmodell.

Falls die Entwicklung des echten Produkts zu teuer sein sollte, um es zu testen, nennt Ries Zappos als Beispiel – den Online-Schuhversandhandel aus den USA, der Vorbild für das deutsche Zalando war. Die Hypothese des Start-ups, Kunden wären dazu bereit, Schuhe online zu kaufen, überprüfte Zappos mittels einer Fake-Website, auf der Kunden angeblich Schuhe bestellen konnten. Die Kunden bissen an – und die Hypothese war bestätigt. Ähnlich ging auch der Online-Speicherdienst Dropbox vor. Statt einen Prototypen zu entwickeln, drehte das Start-up anfangs lediglich ein Video, das zeigte, wie der Dienst funktionieren sollte – und ermöglichte den Besuchern der Website, sich per E-Mail informieren zu lassen, sobald der Dienst verfügbar ist. Viele trugen Ihre E-Mail-Adresse ein – die Hypothese der Nachfrage nach dem Dienst bestätigte sich.

4. Fehler: Zu lange an der falschen Idee festhalten

Nicht wenige Gründer haben das Idealbild eines Unternehmers, der fest an seine Idee glaubt – und an ihr festhält trotz aller Widrigkeiten. Auch wenn ein gewisses Durchhaltevermögen als Gründer sicher nicht falsch ist, lässt sich in Wahrheit relativ schnell feststellen, ob das Start-up überhaupt erfolgreich sein kann.

Ries macht dazu zwei Hypothesen aus, die sich relativ früh bestätigen müssen: Die Werthypothese besagt, dass das Unternehmen einen Nutzen für die Kunden bietet. Sie wird dadurch bestätigt, dass das Produkt Early Adopter – also frühe Anwender – findet, die es nutzen.

Die Wachstumshypothese ist die zweite Hypothese, die für das Funktionieren der meisten Geschäftsmodelle zutreffen muss. Sie besagt, dass das Produkt auch über den kleinen Kreis der Early Adopter hinaus Anklang findet – also einen großen Markt finden wird.

Ries nennt Facebook als ein Unternehmen, dem es sehr schnell gelang, beide Hypothesen zu bestätigen: Die Werthypothese bestätigte sich, weil schon die ersten registrierten Nutzer sich häufig anmeldeten und viel Zeit auf dem sozialen Netzwerk verbrachten. Die Wachstumshypothese bestätigte sich, weil sich an Colleges, an denen Facebook neu startete, binnen kürzester Zeit sehr viele Studenten anmeldeten. Meist waren es drei Viertel aller Studenten innerhalb von sechs Monaten – und das ohne Marketing-Ausgaben. Die frühen Erfolgsdaten stärkten das Vertrauen der Investoren, die schnell eine Millionenfinanzierung genehmigten.

Gelingt es nicht, beide Hypothesen zu bestätigen, kann eine Kehrtwende notwendig sein – Pivot nennt Ries das. Mögliche Konsequenzen sind beispielsweise, dass ein Start-up seinen Kernnutzen enger oder breiter fasst, auf eine neue Kundengruppe zielt oder seinen Vertriebskanal ändert. Wie immer lässt sich jede Änderung als Hypothese am echten Markt testen. Ries schlägt monatlich „Pivot-Meetings“ vor, in denen Daten analysiert werden und somit überprüft wird, ob sich das Unternehmen auf dem richtigen Weg befindet.

5. Fehler: Zu langes Zögern

Ries glaubt, dass viele Start-ups zu lange damit warten, ihr Produkt am Markt zu testen. Ein Minimal Viable Product, wie er es nennt, also die am schnellsten realisierbare Minimalversion eines Produkts, sollte dazu dienen, herauszufinden, ob nach dieser Art Produkt überhaupt eine Nachfrage am Markt herrscht. Außerdem kann sich das Unternehmen so schnell erstes Feedback von echten Kunden holen. Ein Start-up muss eben sein Geschäftsmodell erst noch finden. Im Extremfall kann dieses Minimalprodukt auch nur ein Test sein – wie in den Fällen Zappos und Dropbox (siehe Punkt 3).

6. Fehler: Sich von schmeichelhaften aber irreführende Kennzahlen ablenken lassen

Ein Start-up benötigt die richtigen Kennzahlen, um den eigenen Erfolg zu messen. Allzu oft verlassen sich Gründer laut Ries aber auf Kennzahlen, die für den Erfolg unerheblich sind aber vor allem dem eigenen Ego schmeicheln. Er nennt diese Kennzahlen Vanity Metrics – Eitelkeitskennzahlen. Sie sehen gut aus, bringen das Geschäftsmodell aber nicht voran. Dazu gehören Aufmerksamkeit durch die Medien, Anzahl von Fans der eigenen Facebook-Seite, in das Start-up hineingesteckte Arbeit oder das Erreichen selbstgesteckter Meilenstein-Ziele. Am Ende entscheiden die Kunden am Markt über Erfolg und Misserfolg des Unternehmens.

Stattdessen sollten Gründer die richtigen Core Metrics herausfinden – die Kennzahlen, auf die es wirklich ankommt. Das könnte beispielsweise der Zuwachs an zahlenden Kunden oder die Weiterempfehlungsrate von Kunden sein. Mittels so genannter Kohorten-Analysen lassen sich auch frühe Nutzer mit später hinzugestoßenen Nutzern vergleichen und herausfinden, ob beispielsweise die Weiterempfehlungsrate gestiegen oder gesunken ist.

7. Fehler: Bei der Wachstums-Strategie verzetteln

Ist erst einmal der Markteintritt gelungen und es besteht eine Nachfrage nach dem Produkt, benötigt jedes Start-up eine Wachstumsstrategie. Ries sieht hier im Wesentlichen drei Möglichkeiten für schlanke Start-up zu wachsen:

1. Zufriedene Kunden halten
2. Virale Verbreitung des Produkts über Empfehlungen
3. Zahlende Nutzer, mit deren Einnahmen in klassische Marketingausgaben wie Werbung investiert werden kann

Grundsätzlich könne zwar jedes Geschäftsmodell auf mehreren Wachstumsmotoren fußen. Start-ups sollten sich aber auf einen der drei konzentrieren und diesen auf Hochtouren bringen, rät Ries. So lasse sich der Erfolg neuer Produktfunktionen bewerten: Nur wenn sie das Wachstum beschleunigen, sind sie sinnvoll.

Um das zu überprüfen, schlägt Ries einen sogenanntenA/B- oder Split-Test vor: Zufällig ausgewählt erhält nur die Hälfte der Kunden eine neue Funktion. Anhand von Feedback und Kennzahlen wie der Weiterempfehlungsrate lässt sich nun herausfinden, ob die Neuerung sinnvoll war.“

Originalzitat aus: http://derstandard.at/1363709600998/Die-sieben-Todsuenden-von-Start-ups, Stephan Dörner, WSJ.de/derStandard.at, 30.4. 2013

http://blogs.wallstreetjournal.de/wsj-tech/2013/04/29/die-sieben-todsunden-von-start-ups/

Constantin Bisanz, Wiener, Jahrgang 1973, Innovator

In welche Start-ups würden Sie investieren wollen?
Mich interessieren vor allem Themen, die groß und international skalieren können. Es kommt immer in  Wellen, es gab die  Marktplatzwelle,  die Social-Netzwerk-Welle. Momentan ist da aber nichts. Aber in den nächsten Wochen, Monaten kommt die nächste Welle. Da muss man am Spot sein, rechtzeitig paddeln und aufspringen.

 

Nach San Francisco…
Ja. Und ich  habe dort miterlebt, wie sich die Dotcom-Blase  aufgebläht hat, wie alle mit den Dollarzeichen in den Augen herumgerannt sind.  Es gab eine Dotcom-Party nach der anderen, teilweise mit zwei Millionen Dollar Budget pro Abend. Total verrückt. Und ich habe das Platzen der Blase miterlebt – am eigenen Leib. Ich habe gesehen, welche Geschäftsmodelle überlebt haben, und das waren  klassischen Marktplatzkonzepte. Ich bin nach München gegangen und habe einen Marktplatz für Nutzfahrzeuge gegründet, TruckScout24. Später habe ich es an die Scout-Gruppe verkauft – drei Stunden nach dem Verkauf gründete ich Brands4Friends.

In welche Start-ups würden Sie investieren wollen?
Mich interessieren vor allem Themen, die groß und international skalieren können. Es kommt immer in  Wellen, es gab die  Marktplatzwelle,  die Social-Netzwerk-Welle. Momentan ist da aber nichts. Aber in den nächsten Wochen, Monaten kommt die nächste Welle. Da muss man am Spot sein, rechtzeitig paddeln und aufspringen.

 

Wurden Sie  bereits gefragt, ob Sie aufspringen wollen?
Ich bekomme jeden Tag um die 25 Businesspläne zugeschickt.

Quelle: http://futurezone.at/b2b/5450-start-ups-bald-kommt-die-naechste-welle.php