Archiv der Kategorie: Big Data

Google’s DeepMind AI can accurately detect 50 types of eye disease just by looking at scans

Mustafa Suleyman 1831_preview (1)DeepMind cofounder Mustafa Suleyman.DeepMind
  • Google’s artificial intelligence company DeepMind has published „really significant“ research showing its algorithm can identify around 50 eye diseases by looking at retinal eye scans.
  • DeepMind said its AI was as good as expert clinicians, and that it could help prevent people from losing their sight.
  • DeepMind has been criticised for its practices around medical data, but cofounder Mustafa Suleyman said all the information in this research project was anonymised.
  • The company plans to hand the technology over for free to NHS hospitals for five years, provided it passes the next phase of research.

Google’s artificial intelligence company, DeepMind, has developed an AI which can successfully detect more than 50 types of eye disease just by looking at 3D retinal scans.

DeepMind published on Monday the results of joint research with Moorfields Eye Hospital, a renowned centre for treating eye conditions in London, in Nature Medicine.

The company said its AI was as accurate as expert clinicians when it came to detecting diseases, such as diabetic eye disease and macular degeneration. It could also recommend the best course of action for patients and suggest which needed urgent care.

OCT scanA technician examines an OCT scan.DeepMind

What is especially significant about the research, according to DeepMind cofounder Mustafa Suleyman, is that the AI has a level of „explainability“ that could boost doctors‘ trust in its recommendations.

„It’s possible for the clinician to interpret what the algorithm is thinking,“ he told Business Insider. „[They can] look at the underlying segmentation.“

In other words, the AI looks less like a mysterious black box that’s spitting out results. It labels pixels on the eye scan that corresponds to signs of a particular disease, Suleyman explained, and can calculate its confidence in its own findings with a percentage score. „That’s really significant,“ he said.

DeepMind's algorithm analysing an OCT eye scanDeepMind’s AI analysing an OCT scan.DeepMind

Suleyman described the findings as a „research breakthrough“ and said the next step was to prove the AI works in a clinical setting. That, he said, would take a number of years. Once DeepMind is in a position to deploy its AI across NHS hospitals in the UK, it will provide the service for free for five years.

Patients are at risk of losing their sight because doctors can’t look at their eye scans in time

British eye specialists have been warning for years that patients are at risk of losing their sight because the NHS is overstretched, and because the UK has an ageing population.

Part of the reason DeepMind and Moorfields took up the research project was because clinicians are „overwhelmed“ by the demand for eye scans, Suleyman said.

„If you have a sight-threatening disease, you want treatment as soon as possible,“ he explained. „And unlike in A&E, where a staff nurse will talk to you and make an evaluation of how serious your condition is, then use that evaluation to decide how quickly you are seen. When an [eye] scan is submitted, there isn’t a triage of your scan according to its severity.“

OCT scanA patient having an OCT scan.DeepMind

Putting eye scans through the AI could speed the entire process up.

„In the future, I could envisage a person going into their local high street optician, and have an OCT scan done and this algorithm would identify those patients with sight-threatening disease at the very early stage of the condition,“ said Dr Pearse Keane, consultant ophthalmologist at Moorfields Eye Hospital.

DeepMind’s AI was trained on a database of almost 15,000 eye scans, stripped of any identifying information. DeepMind worked with clinicians to label areas of disease, then ran those labelled images through its system. Suleyman said the two-and-a-half project required „huge investment“ from DeepMind and involved 25 staffers, as well as the researchers from Moorfields.

People are still worried about a Google-linked company having access to medical data

Google acquired DeepMind in 2014 for £400 million ($509 million), and the British AI company is probably most famous for AlphaGo, its algorithm that beat the world champion at the strategy game Go.

While DeepMind has remained UK-based and independent from Google, the relationship has attracted scrutiny. The main question is whether Google, a private US company, should have access to the sensitive medical data required for DeepMind’s health arm.

DeepMind was criticised in 2016 for failing to disclose its access to historical medical data during a project with Royal Free Hospital. Suleyman said the eye scans processed by DeepMind were „completely anonymised.“

„You can’t identify whose scans it was. We’re in quite a different regime, this is very much research, and we’re a number of years from being able to deploy in practice,“ he said.

Suleyman added: „How this has the potential to have transform the NHS is very clear. We’ve been very conscious that this will be a model that’s published, and available to others to implement.

„The labelled dataset is available to other researchers. So this is very much an open and collaborative relationship between equals that we’ve worked hard to foster. I’m proud of that work.“

 

https://www.businessinsider.de/google-deepmind-ai-detects-eye-disease-2018-8?r=US&IR=T

Advertisements

Microsoft wants regulation of facial recognition technology to limit ‚abuse‘

Facial recognition put to the test
Facial recognition put to the test

Microsoft has helped innovate facial recognition software. Now it’s urging the US government to enact regulation to control the use of the technology.

In a blog post, Microsoft (MSFT)President Brad Smith said new laws are necessary given the technology’s „broad societal ramifications and potential for abuse.“

He urged lawmakers to form „a government initiative to regulate the proper use of facial recognition technology, informed first by a bipartisan and expert commission.“

Facial recognition — a computer’s ability to identify or verify people’s faces from a photo or through a camera — has been developing rapidly. Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOG), Amazon and Microsoft are among the big tech companies developing and selling such systems. The technology is being used across a range of industries, from private businesses like hotels and casinos, to social media and law enforcement.

Supporters say facial recognition software improves safety for companies and customers and can help police track police down criminals or find missing children. Civil rights groups warn it can infringe on privacy and allow for illegal surveillance and monitoring. There is also room for error, they argue, since the still-emerging technology can result in false identifications.

The accuracy of facial recognition technologies varies, with women and people of color being identified with less accuracy, according to MIT research.

„Facial recognition raises a critical question: what role do we want this type of technology to play in everyday society?“ Smith wrote on Friday.

Smith’s call for a regulatory framework to control the technology comes as tech companies face criticism over how they’ve handled and shared customer data, as well as their cooperation with government agencies.

Last month, Microsoft was scrutinized for its working relationship with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. ICE had been enforcing the Trump administration’s „zero tolerance“ immigration policy that separated children from their parents when they crossed the US border illegally. The administration has since abandoned the policy.

Microsoft urges Trump administration to change its policy separating families at border

Microsoft wrote a blog post in January about ICE’s use of its cloud technology Azure, saying it could help it „accelerate facial recognition and identification.“

After questions arose about whether Microsoft’s technology had been used by ICE agents to carry out the controversial border separations, the company released a statement calling the policy „cruel“ and „abusive.“

In his post, Smith reiterated Microsoft’s opposition to the policy and said he had confirmed its contract with ICE does not include facial recognition technology.

Amazon(AMZN) has also come under fire from its own shareholders and civil rights groups over local police forces using its face identifying software Rekognition, which can identify up to 100 people in a single photo.

Some Amazon shareholders coauthored a letter pressuring Amazon to stop selling the technology to the government, saying it was aiding in mass surveillance and posed a threat to privacy rights.

Amazon asked to stop selling facial recognition technology to police

And Facebook (FB) is embroiled in a class-action lawsuit that alleges the social media giant used facial recognition on photos without user permission. Its facial recognition tool scans your photos and suggests you tag friends.

Neither Amazon nor Facebook immediately responded to a request for comment about Smith’s call for new regulations on face ID technology.

Smith said companies have a responsibility to police their own innovations, control how they are deployed and ensure that they are used in a „a manner consistent with broadly held societal values.“

„It may seem unusual for a company to ask for government regulation of its products, but there are many markets where thoughtful regulation contributes to a healthier dynamic for consumers and producers alike,“ he said.

https://money.cnn.com/2018/07/14/technology/microsoft-facial-recognition-letter-government/index.html

The Evolution of AI

Photo credit: Peg Skorpinski

Source: https://medium.com/@mijordan3/artificial-intelligence-the-revolution-hasnt-happened-yet-5e1d5812e1e7

Artificial Intelligence — The Revolution Hasn’t Happened Yet

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the mantra of the current era. The phrase is intoned by technologists, academicians, journalists and venture capitalists alike. As with many phrases that cross over from technical academic fields into general circulation, there is significant misunderstanding accompanying the use of the phrase. But this is not the classical case of the public not understanding the scientists — here the scientists are often as befuddled as the public. The idea that our era is somehow seeing the emergence of an intelligence in silicon that rivals our own entertains all of us — enthralling us and frightening us in equal measure. And, unfortunately, it distracts us.

There is a different narrative that one can tell about the current era. Consider the following story, which involves humans, computers, data and life-or-death decisions, but where the focus is something other than intelligence-in-silicon fantasies. When my spouse was pregnant 14 years ago, we had an ultrasound. There was a geneticist in the room, and she pointed out some white spots around the heart of the fetus. “Those are markers for Down syndrome,” she noted, “and your risk has now gone up to 1 in 20.” She further let us know that we could learn whether the fetus in fact had the genetic modification underlying Down syndrome via an amniocentesis. But amniocentesis was risky — the risk of killing the fetus during the procedure was roughly 1 in 300. Being a statistician, I determined to find out where these numbers were coming from. To cut a long story short, I discovered that a statistical analysis had been done a decade previously in the UK, where these white spots, which reflect calcium buildup, were indeed established as a predictor of Down syndrome. But I also noticed that the imaging machine used in our test had a few hundred more pixels per square inch than the machine used in the UK study. I went back to tell the geneticist that I believed that the white spots were likely false positives — that they were literally “white noise.” She said “Ah, that explains why we started seeing an uptick in Down syndrome diagnoses a few years ago; it’s when the new machine arrived.”

We didn’t do the amniocentesis, and a healthy girl was born a few months later. But the episode troubled me, particularly after a back-of-the-envelope calculation convinced me that many thousands of people had gotten that diagnosis that same day worldwide, that many of them had opted for amniocentesis, and that a number of babies had died needlessly. And this happened day after day until it somehow got fixed. The problem that this episode revealed wasn’t about my individual medical care; it was about a medical system that measured variables and outcomes in various places and times, conducted statistical analyses, and made use of the results in other places and times. The problem had to do not just with data analysis per se, but with what database researchers call “provenance” — broadly, where did data arise, what inferences were drawn from the data, and how relevant are those inferences to the present situation? While a trained human might be able to work all of this out on a case-by-case basis, the issue was that of designing a planetary-scale medical system that could do this without the need for such detailed human oversight.

I’m also a computer scientist, and it occurred to me that the principles needed to build planetary-scale inference-and-decision-making systems of this kind, blending computer science with statistics, and taking into account human utilities, were nowhere to be found in my education. And it occurred to me that the development of such principles — which will be needed not only in the medical domain but also in domains such as commerce, transportation and education — were at least as important as those of building AI systems that can dazzle us with their game-playing or sensorimotor skills.

Whether or not we come to understand “intelligence” any time soon, we do have a major challenge on our hands in bringing together computers and humans in ways that enhance human life. While this challenge is viewed by some as subservient to the creation of “artificial intelligence,” it can also be viewed more prosaically — but with no less reverence — as the creation of a new branch of engineering. Much like civil engineering and chemical engineering in decades past, this new discipline aims to corral the power of a few key ideas, bringing new resources and capabilities to people, and doing so safely. Whereas civil engineering and chemical engineering were built on physics and chemistry, this new engineering discipline will be built on ideas that the preceding century gave substance to — ideas such as “information,” “algorithm,” “data,” “uncertainty,” “computing,” “inference,” and “optimization.” Moreover, since much of the focus of the new discipline will be on data from and about humans, its development will require perspectives from the social sciences and humanities.

While the building blocks have begun to emerge, the principles for putting these blocks together have not yet emerged, and so the blocks are currently being put together in ad-hoc ways.

Thus, just as humans built buildings and bridges before there was civil engineering, humans are proceeding with the building of societal-scale, inference-and-decision-making systems that involve machines, humans and the environment. Just as early buildings and bridges sometimes fell to the ground — in unforeseen ways and with tragic consequences — many of our early societal-scale inference-and-decision-making systems are already exposing serious conceptual flaws.

And, unfortunately, we are not very good at anticipating what the next emerging serious flaw will be. What we’re missing is an engineering discipline with its principles of analysis and design.

The current public dialog about these issues too often uses “AI” as an intellectual wildcard, one that makes it difficult to reason about the scope and consequences of emerging technology. Let us begin by considering more carefully what “AI” has been used to refer to, both recently and historically.

Most of what is being called “AI” today, particularly in the public sphere, is what has been called “Machine Learning” (ML) for the past several decades. ML is an algorithmic field that blends ideas from statistics, computer science and many other disciplines (see below) to design algorithms that process data, make predictions and help make decisions. In terms of impact on the real world, ML is the real thing, and not just recently. Indeed, that ML would grow into massive industrial relevance was already clear in the early 1990s, and by the turn of the century forward-looking companies such as Amazon were already using ML throughout their business, solving mission-critical back-end problems in fraud detection and supply-chain prediction, and building innovative consumer-facing services such as recommendation systems. As datasets and computing resources grew rapidly over the ensuing two decades, it became clear that ML would soon power not only Amazon but essentially any company in which decisions could be tied to large-scale data. New business models would emerge. The phrase “Data Science” began to be used to refer to this phenomenon, reflecting the need of ML algorithms experts to partner with database and distributed-systems experts to build scalable, robust ML systems, and reflecting the larger social and environmental scope of the resulting systems.

This confluence of ideas and technology trends has been rebranded as “AI” over the past few years. This rebranding is worthy of some scrutiny.

Historically, the phrase “AI” was coined in the late 1950’s to refer to the heady aspiration of realizing in software and hardware an entity possessing human-level intelligence. We will use the phrase “human-imitative AI” to refer to this aspiration, emphasizing the notion that the artificially intelligent entity should seem to be one of us, if not physically at least mentally (whatever that might mean). This was largely an academic enterprise. While related academic fields such as operations research, statistics, pattern recognition, information theory and control theory already existed, and were often inspired by human intelligence (and animal intelligence), these fields were arguably focused on “low-level” signals and decisions. The ability of, say, a squirrel to perceive the three-dimensional structure of the forest it lives in, and to leap among its branches, was inspirational to these fields. “AI” was meant to focus on something different — the “high-level” or “cognitive” capability of humans to “reason” and to “think.” Sixty years later, however, high-level reasoning and thought remain elusive. The developments which are now being called “AI” arose mostly in the engineering fields associated with low-level pattern recognition and movement control, and in the field of statistics — the discipline focused on finding patterns in data and on making well-founded predictions, tests of hypotheses and decisions.

Indeed, the famous “backpropagation” algorithm that was rediscovered by David Rumelhart in the early 1980s, and which is now viewed as being at the core of the so-called “AI revolution,” first arose in the field of control theory in the 1950s and 1960s. One of its early applications was to optimize the thrusts of the Apollo spaceships as they headed towards the moon.

Since the 1960s much progress has been made, but it has arguably not come about from the pursuit of human-imitative AI. Rather, as in the case of the Apollo spaceships, these ideas have often been hidden behind the scenes, and have been the handiwork of researchers focused on specific engineering challenges. Although not visible to the general public, research and systems-building in areas such as document retrieval, text classification, fraud detection, recommendation systems, personalized search, social network analysis, planning, diagnostics and A/B testing have been a major success — these are the advances that have powered companies such as Google, Netflix, Facebook and Amazon.

One could simply agree to refer to all of this as “AI,” and indeed that is what appears to have happened. Such labeling may come as a surprise to optimization or statistics researchers, who wake up to find themselves suddenly referred to as “AI researchers.” But labeling of researchers aside, the bigger problem is that the use of this single, ill-defined acronym prevents a clear understanding of the range of intellectual and commercial issues at play.

The past two decades have seen major progress — in industry and academia — in a complementary aspiration to human-imitative AI that is often referred to as “Intelligence Augmentation” (IA). Here computation and data are used to create services that augment human intelligence and creativity. A search engine can be viewed as an example of IA (it augments human memory and factual knowledge), as can natural language translation (it augments the ability of a human to communicate). Computing-based generation of sounds and images serves as a palette and creativity enhancer for artists. While services of this kind could conceivably involve high-level reasoning and thought, currently they don’t — they mostly perform various kinds of string-matching and numerical operations that capture patterns that humans can make use of.

Hoping that the reader will tolerate one last acronym, let us conceive broadly of a discipline of “Intelligent Infrastructure” (II), whereby a web of computation, data and physical entities exists that makes human environments more supportive, interesting and safe. Such infrastructure is beginning to make its appearance in domains such as transportation, medicine, commerce and finance, with vast implications for individual humans and societies. This emergence sometimes arises in conversations about an “Internet of Things,” but that effort generally refers to the mere problem of getting “things” onto the Internet — not to the far grander set of challenges associated with these “things” capable of analyzing those data streams to discover facts about the world, and interacting with humans and other “things” at a far higher level of abstraction than mere bits.

For example, returning to my personal anecdote, we might imagine living our lives in a “societal-scale medical system” that sets up data flows, and data-analysis flows, between doctors and devices positioned in and around human bodies, thereby able to aid human intelligence in making diagnoses and providing care. The system would incorporate information from cells in the body, DNA, blood tests, environment, population genetics and the vast scientific literature on drugs and treatments. It would not just focus on a single patient and a doctor, but on relationships among all humans — just as current medical testing allows experiments done on one set of humans (or animals) to be brought to bear in the care of other humans. It would help maintain notions of relevance, provenance and reliability, in the way that the current banking system focuses on such challenges in the domain of finance and payment. And, while one can foresee many problems arising in such a system — involving privacy issues, liability issues, security issues, etc — these problems should properly be viewed as challenges, not show-stoppers.

We now come to a critical issue: Is working on classical human-imitative AI the best or only way to focus on these larger challenges? Some of the most heralded recent success stories of ML have in fact been in areas associated with human-imitative AI — areas such as computer vision, speech recognition, game-playing and robotics. So perhaps we should simply await further progress in domains such as these. There are two points to make here. First, although one would not know it from reading the newspapers, success in human-imitative AI has in fact been limited — we are very far from realizing human-imitative AI aspirations. Unfortunately the thrill (and fear) of making even limited progress on human-imitative AI gives rise to levels of over-exuberance and media attention that is not present in other areas of engineering.

Second, and more importantly, success in these domains is neither sufficient nor necessary to solve important IA and II problems. On the sufficiency side, consider self-driving cars. For such technology to be realized, a range of engineering problems will need to be solved that may have little relationship to human competencies (or human lack-of-competencies). The overall transportation system (an II system) will likely more closely resemble the current air-traffic control system than the current collection of loosely-coupled, forward-facing, inattentive human drivers. It will be vastly more complex than the current air-traffic control system, specifically in its use of massive amounts of data and adaptive statistical modeling to inform fine-grained decisions. It is those challenges that need to be in the forefront, and in such an effort a focus on human-imitative AI may be a distraction.

As for the necessity argument, it is sometimes argued that the human-imitative AI aspiration subsumes IA and II aspirations, because a human-imitative AI system would not only be able to solve the classical problems of AI (as embodied, e.g., in the Turing test), but it would also be our best bet for solving IA and II problems. Such an argument has little historical precedent. Did civil engineering develop by envisaging the creation of an artificial carpenter or bricklayer? Should chemical engineering have been framed in terms of creating an artificial chemist? Even more polemically: if our goal was to build chemical factories, should we have first created an artificial chemist who would have then worked out how to build a chemical factory?

A related argument is that human intelligence is the only kind of intelligence that we know, and that we should aim to mimic it as a first step. But humans are in fact not very good at some kinds of reasoning — we have our lapses, biases and limitations. Moreover, critically, we did not evolve to perform the kinds of large-scale decision-making that modern II systems must face, nor to cope with the kinds of uncertainty that arise in II contexts. One could argue
that an AI system would not only imitate human intelligence, but also “correct” it, and would also scale to arbitrarily large problems. But we are now in the realm of science fiction — such speculative arguments, while entertaining in the setting of fiction, should not be our principal strategy going forward in the face of the critical IA and II problems that are beginning to emerge. We need to solve IA and II problems on their own merits, not as a mere corollary to a human-imitative AI agenda.

It is not hard to pinpoint algorithmic and infrastructure challenges in II systems that are not central themes in human-imitative AI research. II systems require the ability to manage distributed repositories of knowledge that are rapidly changing and are likely to be globally incoherent. Such systems must cope with cloud-edge interactions in making timely, distributed decisions and they must deal with long-tail phenomena whereby there is lots of data on some individuals and little data on most individuals. They must address the difficulties of sharing data across administrative and competitive boundaries. Finally, and of particular importance, II systems must bring economic ideas such as incentives and pricing into the realm of the statistical and computational infrastructures that link humans to each other and to valued goods. Such II systems can be viewed as not merely providing a service, but as creating markets. There are domains such as music, literature and journalism that are crying out for the emergence of such markets, where data analysis links producers and consumers. And this must all be done within the context of evolving societal, ethical and legal norms.

Of course, classical human-imitative AI problems remain of great interest as well. However, the current focus on doing AI research via the gathering of data, the deployment of “deep learning” infrastructure, and the demonstration of systems that mimic certain narrowly-defined human skills — with little in the way of emerging explanatory principles — tends to deflect attention from major open problems in classical AI. These problems include the need to bring meaning and reasoning into systems that perform natural language processing, the need to infer and represent causality, the need to develop computationally-tractable representations of uncertainty and the need to develop systems that formulate and pursue long-term goals. These are classical goals in human-imitative AI, but in the current hubbub over the “AI revolution,” it is easy to forget that they are not yet solved.

IA will also remain quite essential, because for the foreseeable future, computers will not be able to match humans in their ability to reason abstractly about real-world situations. We will need well-thought-out interactions of humans and computers to solve our most pressing problems. And we will want computers to trigger new levels of human creativity, not replace human creativity (whatever that might mean).

It was John McCarthy (while a professor at Dartmouth, and soon to take a
position at MIT) who coined the term “AI,” apparently to distinguish his
budding research agenda from that of Norbert Wiener (then an older professor at MIT). Wiener had coined “cybernetics” to refer to his own vision of intelligent systems — a vision that was closely tied to operations research, statistics, pattern recognition, information theory and control theory. McCarthy, on the other hand, emphasized the ties to logic. In an interesting reversal, it is Wiener’s intellectual agenda that has come to dominate in the current era, under the banner of McCarthy’s terminology. (This state of affairs is surely, however, only temporary; the pendulum swings more in AI than
in most fields.)

But we need to move beyond the particular historical perspectives of McCarthy and Wiener.

We need to realize that the current public dialog on AI — which focuses on a narrow subset of industry and a narrow subset of academia — risks blinding us to the challenges and opportunities that are presented by the full scope of AI, IA and II.

This scope is less about the realization of science-fiction dreams or nightmares of super-human machines, and more about the need for humans to understand and shape technology as it becomes ever more present and influential in their daily lives. Moreover, in this understanding and shaping there is a need for a diverse set of voices from all walks of life, not merely a dialog among the technologically attuned. Focusing narrowly on human-imitative AI prevents an appropriately wide range of voices from being heard.

While industry will continue to drive many developments, academia will also continue to play an essential role, not only in providing some of the most innovative technical ideas, but also in bringing researchers from the computational and statistical disciplines together with researchers from other
disciplines whose contributions and perspectives are sorely needed — notably
the social sciences, the cognitive sciences and the humanities.

On the other hand, while the humanities and the sciences are essential as we go forward, we should also not pretend that we are talking about something other than an engineering effort of unprecedented scale and scope — society is aiming to build new kinds of artifacts. These artifacts should be built to work as claimed. We do not want to build systems that help us with medical treatments, transportation options and commercial opportunities to find out after the fact that these systems don’t really work — that they make errors that take their toll in terms of human lives and happiness. In this regard, as I have emphasized, there is an engineering discipline yet to emerge for the data-focused and learning-focused fields. As exciting as these latter fields appear to be, they cannot yet be viewed as constituting an engineering discipline.

Moreover, we should embrace the fact that what we are witnessing is the creation of a new branch of engineering. The term “engineering” is often
invoked in a narrow sense — in academia and beyond — with overtones of cold, affectless machinery, and negative connotations of loss of control by humans. But an engineering discipline can be what we want it to be.

In the current era, we have a real opportunity to conceive of something historically new — a human-centric engineering discipline.

I will resist giving this emerging discipline a name, but if the acronym “AI” continues to be used as placeholder nomenclature going forward, let’s be aware of the very real limitations of this placeholder. Let’s broaden our scope, tone down the hype and recognize the serious challenges ahead.

Michael I. Jordan

Source: https://medium.com/@mijordan3/artificial-intelligence-the-revolution-hasnt-happened-yet-5e1d5812e1e7

Hey Alexa, What Are You Doing to My Kid’s Brain?

“Unless your parents purge it, your Alexa will hold on to every bit of data you have ever given it, all the way back to the first things you shouted at it as a 2-year-old.”

Among the more modern anxieties of parents today is how virtual assistants will train their children to act. The fear is that kids who habitually order Amazon’s Alexa to read them a story or command Google’s Assistant to tell them a joke are learning to communicate not as polite, considerate citizens, but as demanding little twerps.

This worry has become so widespread that Amazon and Google both announced this week that their voice assistants can now encourage kids to punctuate their requests with „please.“ The version of Alexa that inhabits the new Echo Dot Kids Edition will thank children for „asking so nicely.“ Google Assistant’s forthcoming Pretty Please feature will remind kids to „say the magic word“ before complying with their wishes.

But many psychologists think kids being polite to virtual assistants is less of an issue than parents think—and may even be a red herring. As virtual assistants become increasingly capable, conversational, and prevalent (assistant-embodied devices are forecasted to outnumber humans), psychologists and ethicists are asking deeper, more subtle questions than will Alexa make my kid bossy. And they want parents to do the same.

„When I built my first virtual child, I got a lot of pushback and flak,“ recalls developmental psychologist Justine Cassell, director emeritus of Carnegie Mellon’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute and an expert in the development of AI interfaces for children. It was the early aughts, and Cassell, then at MIT, was studying whether a life-sized, animated kid named Sam could help flesh-and-blood children hone their cognitive, social, and behavioral skills. „Critics worried that the kids would lose track of what was real and what was pretend,“ Cassel says. „That they’d no longer be able to tell the difference between virtual children and actual ones.“

But when you asked the kids whether Sam was a real child, they’d roll their eyes. Of course Sam isn’t real, they’d say. There was zero ambiguity.

Nobody knows for sure, and Cassel emphasizes that the question deserves study, but she suspects today’s children will grow up similarly attuned to the virtual nature of our device-dwelling digital sidekicks—and, by extension, the context in which they do or do not need to be polite. Kids excel, she says, at dividing the world into categories. As long as they continue to separate humans from machines, she says, there’s no need to worry. „Because isn’t that actually what we want children to learn—not that everything that has a voice should be thanked, but that people have feelings?“

Point taken. But what about Duplex, I ask, Google’s new human-sounding, phone calling AI? Well, Cassell says, that complicates matters. When you can’t tell if a voice belongs to a human or a machine, she says, perhaps it’s best to assume you’re talking to a person, to avoid hurting a human’s feelings. But the real issue there isn’t politeness, it’s disclosure; artificial intelligences should be designed to identify themselves as such.

What’s more, the implications of a kid interacting with an AI extend far deeper than whether she recognizes it as non-human. „Of course parents worry about these devices reinforcing negative behaviors, whether it’s being sassy or teasing a virtual assistant,” says Jenny Radesky, a developmental behavioral pediatrician at the University of Michigan and co-author of the latest guidelines for media use from the American Academy of Pediatrics. “But I think there are bigger questions surrounding things like kids’ cognitive development—the way they consume information and build knowledge.”

Consider, for example, that the way kids interact with virtual assistants may not actual help them learn. This advertisement for the Echo Dot Kids Edition ends with a girl asking her smart speaker the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy. As the camera zooms out, we hear Alexa rattle off the answer: „The Andromeda Galaxy is 14 quintillion, 931 quadrillion, 389 trillion, 517 billion, 400 million miles away“:

To parents it might register as a neat feature. Alexa knows answers to questions that you don’t! But most kids don’t learn by simply receiving information. „Learning happens happens when a child is challenged,“ Cassell says, „by a parent, by another child, a teacher—and they can argue back and forth.“

Virtual assistants can’t do that yet, which highlights the importance of parents using smart devices with their kids. At least for the time being. Our digital butlers could be capable of brain-building banter sooner than you think.

This week, Google announced its smart speakers will remain activated several seconds after you issue a command, allowing you to engage in continuous conversation without repeating „Hey, Google,“ or „OK, Google.“ For now, the feature will allow your virtual assistant to keep track of contextually dependent follow-up questions. (If you ask what movies George Clooney has starred in and then ask how tall he his, Google Assistant will recognize that „he“ is in reference to George Clooney.) It’s a far cry from a dialectic exchange, but it charts a clear path toward more conversational forms of inquiry and learning.

And, perhaps, something even more. „I think it’s reasonable to ask if parenting will become a skill that, like Go or chess, is better performed by a machine,“ says John Havens, executive director of the the IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. „What do we do if a kid starts saying: Look, I appreciate the parents in my house, because they put me on the map, biologically. But dad tells a lot of lame dad jokes. And mom is kind of a helicopter parent. And I really prefer the knowledge, wisdom, and insight given to me by my devices.

Havens jokes that he sounds paranoid, because he’s speculating about what-if scenarios from the future. But what about the more near-term? If you start handing duties over to the machine, how do you take them back the day your kid decides Alexa is a higher authority than you are on, say, trigonometry?

Other experts I spoke with agreed it’s not too early for parents to begin thinking deeply about the long-term implications of raising kids in the company of virtual assistants. „I think these tools can be awesome, and provide quick fixes to situations that involve answering questions and telling stories that parents might not always have time for,“ Radesky says. „But I also want parents to consider how that might come to displace some of the experiences they enjoy sharing with kids.“

Other things Radesky, Cassell, and Havens think parents should consider? The extent to which kids understand privacy issues related to internet-connected toys. How their children interact with devices at their friends‘ houses. And what information other family’s devices should be permitted to collect about their kids. In other words: How do children conceptualize the algorithms that serve up facts and entertainment; learn about them; and potentially profit from them?

„The fact is, very few of us sit down and talk with our kids about the social constructs surrounding robots and virtual assistants,“ Radesky says.

Perhaps that—more than whether their children says „please“ and „thank you“ to the smart speaker in the living room—is what parents should be thinking about.

Source:
https://www.wired.com/story/hey-alexa-what-are-you-doing-to-my-kids-brain/

Lawmakers, child development experts, and privacy advocates are expressing concerns about two new Amazon products targeting children, questioning whether they prod kids to be too dependent on technology and potentially jeopardize their privacy.

In a letter to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos on Friday, two members of the bipartisan Congressional Privacy Caucus raised concerns about Amazon’s smart speaker Echo Dot Kids and a companion service called FreeTime Unlimited that lets kids access a children’s version of Alexa, Amazon’s voice-controlled digital assistant.

“While these types of artificial intelligence and voice recognition technology offer potentially new educational and entertainment opportunities, Americans’ privacy, particularly children’s privacy, must be paramount,” wrote Senator Ed Markey (D-Massachusetts) and Representative Joe Barton (R-Texas), both cofounders of the privacy caucus.

The letter includes a dozen questions, including requests for details about how audio of children’s interactions is recorded and saved, parental control over deleting recordings, a list of third parties with access to the data, whether data will be used for marketing purposes, and Amazon’s intentions on maintaining a profile on kids who use these products.

In a statement, Amazon said it „takes privacy and security seriously.“ The company said „Echo Dot Kids Edition uses on-device software to detect the wake word and only the wake word. Only once the wake word is detected does it start streaming to the cloud, and it will present a visual indication (the light ring at the top of the device turns blue) to show that it is streaming to the cloud.“

Echo Dot Kids is the latest in a wave of products from dominant tech players targeting children, including Facebook’s communications app Messenger Kids and Google’s YouTube Kids, both of which have been criticized by child health experts concerned about privacy and developmental issues.

Like Amazon, toy manufacturers are also interested in developing smart speakers that would live in a child’s room. In September, Mattel pulled Aristotle, a smart speaker and digital assistant aimed at children, after a similar letter from Markey and Barton, as well as a petition that garnered more than 15,000 signatures.

One of the organizers of the petition, the nonprofit group Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood, is now spearheading a similar effort against Amazon. In a press release Friday, timed to the letter from Congress, a group of child development and privacy advocates urged parents not to purchase Echo Dot Kids because the device and companion voice service pose a threat to children’s privacy and well-being.

“Amazon wants kids to be dependent on its data-gathering device from the moment they wake up until they go to bed at night,” said the group’s executive director Josh Golin. “The Echo Dot Kids is another unnecessary ‘must-have’ gadget, and it’s also potentially harmful. AI devices raise a host of privacy concerns and interfere with the face-to-face interactions and self-driven play that children need to thrive.”

FreeTime on Alexa includes content targeted at children, like kids’ books and Alexa skills from Disney, Nickelodeon, and National Geographic. It also features parental controls, such as song filtering, bedtime limits, disabled voice purchasing, and positive reinforcement for using the word “please.”

Despite such controls, the child health experts warning against Echo Dot Kids wrote, “Ultimately, though, the device is designed to make kids dependent on Alexa for information and entertainment. Amazon even encourages kids to tell the device ‘Alexa, I’m bored,’ to which Alexa will respond with branded games and content.”

In Amazon’s April press release announcing Echo Dot Kids, the company quoted one representative from a nonprofit group focused on children that supported the product, Stephen Balkam, founder and CEO of the Family Online Safety Institute. Balkam referenced a report from his institute, which found that the majority of parents were comfortable with their child using a smart speaker. Although it was not noted in the press release, Amazon is a member of FOSI and has an executive on the board.

In a statement to WIRED, Amazon said, „We believe one of the core benefits of FreeTime and FreeTime Unlimited is that the services provide parents the tools they need to help manage the interactions between their child and Alexa as they see fit.“ Amazon said parents can review and listen to their children’s voice recordings in the Alexa app, review FreeTime Unlimited activity via the Parent Dashboard, set bedtime limits or pause the device whenever they’d like.

Balkam said his institute disclosed Amazon’s funding of its research on its website and the cover of its report. Amazon did not initiate the study. Balkam said the institute annually proposes a research project, and reaches out to its members, a group that also includes Facebook, Google, and Microsoft, who pay an annual stipend of $30,000. “Amazon stepped up and we worked with them. They gave us editorial control and we obviously gave them recognition for the financial support,” he said.

Balkam says Echo Dot Kids addresses concerns from parents about excessive screen time. “It’s screen-less, it’s very interactive, it’s kid friendly,” he said, pointing out Alexa skills that encourage kids to go outside.

In its review of the product, BuzzFeed wrote, “Unless your parents purge it, your Alexa will hold on to every bit of data you have ever given it, all the way back to the first things you shouted at it as a 2-year-old.”

Sources:
https://www.wired.com/story/congress-privacy-groups-question-amazons-echo-dot-for-kids/

Most dangerous attack techniques, and what’s coming next 2018

RSA Conference 2018

Experts from SANS presented the five most dangerous new cyber attack techniques in their annual RSA Conference 2018 keynote session in San Francisco, and shared their views on how they work, how they can be stopped or at least slowed, and how businesses and consumers can prepare.

dangerous attack techniques

The five threats outlined are:

1. Repositories and cloud storage data leakage
2. Big Data analytics, de-anonymization, and correlation
3. Attackers monetize compromised systems using crypto coin miners
4. Recognition of hardware flaws
5. More malware and attacks disrupting ICS and utilities instead of seeking profit.

Repositories and cloud storage data leakage

Ed Skoudis, lead for the SANS Penetration Testing Curriculum, talked about the data leakage threats facing us from the increased use of repositories and cloud storage:

“Software today is built in a very different way than it was 10 or even 5 years ago, with vast online code repositories for collaboration and cloud data storage hosting mission-critical applications. However, attackers are increasingly targeting these kinds of repositories and cloud storage infrastructures, looking for passwords, crypto keys, access tokens, and terabytes of sensitive data.”

He continued: “Defenders need to focus on data inventories, appointing a data curator for their organization and educating system architects and developers about how to secure data assets in the cloud. Additionally, the big cloud companies have each launched an AI service to help classify and defend data in their infrastructures. And finally, a variety of free tools are available that can help prevent and detect leakage of secrets through code repositories.”

Big Data analytics, de-anonymization, and correlation

Skoudis went on to talk about the threat of Big Data Analytics and how attackers are using data from several sources to de-anonymise users:

“In the past, we battled attackers who were trying to get access to our machines to steal data for criminal use. Now the battle is shifting from hacking machines to hacking data — gathering data from disparate sources and fusing it together to de-anonymise users, find business weaknesses and opportunities, or otherwise undermine an organisation’s mission. We still need to prevent attackers from gaining shell on targets to steal data. However, defenders also need to start analysing risks associated with how their seemingly innocuous data can be combined with data from other sources to introduce business risk, all while carefully considering the privacy implications of their data and its potential to tarnish a brand or invite regulatory scrutiny.”

Attackers monetize compromised systems using crypto coin miners

Johannes Ullrich, is Dean of Research, SANS Institute and Director of SANS Internet Storm Center. He has been looking at the increasing use of crypto coin miners by cyber criminals:

“Last year, we talked about how ransomware was used to sell data back to its owner and crypto-currencies were the tool of choice to pay the ransom. More recently, we have found that attackers are no longer bothering with data. Due to the flood of stolen data offered for sale, the value of most commonly stolen data like credit card numbers of PII has dropped significantly. Attackers are instead installing crypto coin miners. These attacks are more stealthy and less likely to be discovered and attackers can earn tens of thousands of dollars a month from crypto coin miners. Defenders therefore need to learn to detect these coin miners and to identify the vulnerabilities that have been exploited in order to install them.”

Recognition of hardware flaws

Ullrich then went on to say that software developers often assume that hardware is flawless and that this is a dangerous assumption. He explains why and what needs to be done:

“Hardware is no less complex then software and mistakes have been made in developing hardware just as they are made by software developers. Patching hardware is a lot more difficult and often not possible without replacing entire systems or suffering significant performance penalties. Developers therefore need to learn to create software without relying on hardware to mitigate any security issues. Similar to the way in which software uses encryption on untrusted networks, software needs to authenticate and encrypt data within the system. Some emerging homomorphic encryption algorithms may allow developers to operate on encrypted data without having to decrypt it first.”

most dangerous attack techniques

More malware and attacks disrupting ICS and utilities instead of seeking profit

Finally, Head of R&D, SANS Institute, James Lyne, discussed the growing trend in malware and attacks that aren’t profit centred as we have largely seen in the past, but instead are focused on disrupting Industrial Control Systems (ICS) and utilities:

“Day to day the grand majority of malicious code has undeniably been focused on fraud and profit. Yet, with the relentless deployment of technology in our societies, the opportunity for political or even military influence only grows. And rare publicly visible attacks like Triton/TriSYS show the capability and intent of those who seek to compromise some of the highest risk components of industrial environments, i.e. the safety systems which have historically prevented critical security and safety meltdowns.”

He continued: “ICS systems are relatively immature and easy to exploit in comparison to the mainstream computing world. Many ICS systems lack the mitigations of modern operating systems and applications. The reliance on obscurity or isolation (both increasingly untrue) do not position them well to withstand a heightened focus on them, and we need to address this as an industry. More worrying is that attackers have demonstrated they have the inclination and resources to diversify their attacks, targeting the sensors that are used to provide data to the industrial controllers themselves. The next few years are likely to see some painful lessons being learned as this attack domain grows, since the mitigations are inconsistent and quite embryonic.”

Source: https://www.helpnetsecurity.com/2018/04/23/dangerous-attack-techniques/

Machine Learning – Basics – Einsatzgebiete – Technik

Machine Learning, Deep Learning, Cognitive Computing – Technologien der Künstlichen Intelligenz verbreiten sich rasant. Hintergrund ist, dass heute die Rechen- und Speicherkapazitäten zur Verfügung stehen, die KI-Szenarien möglich machen. Ein Überblick.
 
  • Machine Learning hilft, Muster in großen Datenbeständen zu erkennen und daraus Erkenntnisse zu gewinnen
  • Die Einsatzszenarien reichen von der Spamanalyse über Stauprognosen bis hin zur medizinischen Diagnostik
  • Technische Grundlage ist eine Cloud-basierte Digital Infrastructure Platform

http://www.computerwoche.de/a/machine-learning-darum-geht-s,3330413
http://www.computerwoche.de/a/machine-learning-das-haben-deutsche-unternehmen-vor,3330418
http://www.computerwoche.de/a/machine-learning-die-technik,3330420

Künstliche Intelligenz und Machine Learning (ML) sind keine neuen Technologien, doch im praktischen Einsatz spielen sie erst jetzt eine wichtige Rolle. Woran liegt das? Wichtigste Voraussetzung für lernende Systeme und entsprechende Algorithmen sind ausreichende Rechenkapazitäten und der Zugriff auf riesige Datenmengen – egal ob es sich um Kunden-, Log- oder Sensordaten handelt. Sie sind für das Training der Algorithmen und die Modellbildung unverzichtbar – und sie stehen mit Public- und Private-Cloud-Infrastrukturen zur Verfügung.

Bildanalyse und -erkennung ist das wichtigste Machine-Learning-Thema, doch die Spracherkennung und -verarbeitung ist schwer im Kommen.
Bildanalyse und -erkennung ist das wichtigste Machine-Learning-Thema, doch die Spracherkennung und -verarbeitung ist schwer im Kommen.
Foto: Crisp Research, Kassel

 

Die Analysten von Crisp Research sind im Rahmen einer umfassenden Studie gemeinsam mit The unbelievable Machine Company und Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) der Frage nachgegangen, welche Rolle Machine Learning heute und in Zukunft im Unternehmenseinsatz spielen wird. Dabei zeigt sich, dass deutsche Unternehmen hier schon recht weit fortgeschritten sind. Bereits ein Fünftel setzt ML-Technologien aktiv ein, 64 Prozent beschäftigen sich intensiv mit dem Thema und vier von fünf Befragten sagen sogar, ML werde irgendwann eine der Kerntechnologien des vollständig digitalisierten Unternehmens sein.

Muster erkennen und Vorhersagen treffen

ML-Algorithmen helfen den Menschen, Muster in vorhandenen Datenbeständen zu erkennen, Vorhersagen zu treffen oder Daten zu klassifizieren. Mit mathematischen Modellen können neue Erkenntnisse auf Grundlage dieser Muster gewonnen werden. Das gilt für viele Lebens- und Geschäftsbereiche. Oftmals profitieren Internet-Nutzer längst davon, ohne über die Technologie im Hintergrund nachzudenken.

Das Spektrum der Anwendungen reicht von Musik- und Filmempfehlungen im privaten Umfeld bis hin zur Verbesserung von Marketing-Kampagnen, Kundenservices oder auch Logistikrouten im geschäftlichen Bereich. Dafür steht ein breites Spektrum an ML-Verfahren zur Verfügung, darunter Lineare Regression, Instanzenbasiertes Lernen, Entscheidungs-Baum-Algorithmen, Bayesche Statistik, Clusteranalyse, Neuronale Netzwerke, Deep Learning und Verfahren zur Dimensionsreduktion.

Die Anwendungsbereiche sind vielfältig und teilweise bekannt. Man denke etwa an Spam-Erkennung, die Personalisierung von Inhalten, das Klassifizieren von Dokumenten, Sentiment-Analysen, Prognosen der Kundenabwanderung, E-Mail-Klassifizierung, Analyse von Upselling-Möglichkeiten, Stauprognosen, Genomanalysen, medizinische Diagnostik, Chatbots und vieles mehr. Für nahezu alle Branchen und Unternehmenstypen ergeben sich also Gelegenheiten.

Moderne IT-Plattformen unterstützen KI

Machine Learning ist laut Crisp Research idealerweise Bestandteil einer modernen, skalierungsfähigen und flexiblen IT-Infrastruktur – einer „Digital Infrastructure Platform“. Diese zeichnet sich durch Elastizität, Automatisierung, eine API-basierte Architektur und Agilität aus. Eine solche Plattform ist in der Regel Cloud-basiert aufgesetzt und dient als Grundlage für die Entwicklung und den Betrieb neuer digitaler Anwendungen und Prozesse. Sie bietet eine offene Architektur, Programmierschnittstellen (APIs), um externe Services zu integrieren, die Unterstützung von DevOps-Konzepten sowie moderne Methoden für kurze Release- und Innovationszyklen.

Die Verarbeitung und Analyse großer Datenmengen ist eine Kernaufgabe einer solchen Digital Infrastructure Platform. Deshalb müssen die IT-Verantwortlichen Sorge tragen, dass ihre IT mit unterschiedlichen Verfahren der Künstlichen Intelligenz umgehen kann. Server-, Storage- und Netzwerk-Infrastrukturen müssen auf neue ML-basierte Workloads ausgelegt sein. Auch das Daten-Management muss vorbereitet sein, damit ML-as-a-Service-Angebote in der Cloud genutzt werden können.

Im Kontext von ML haben sich in den vergangenen Monaten auch alternative Hardwarekomponenten durchgesetzt, etwa GPU-basierte Cluster von Nvidia, Googles Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) oder IBMs TrueNorth-Prozessor. Unternehmen müssen sich entscheiden, ob sie hier selbst investieren oder die Angebote entsprechender Cloud-Provider nutzen wollen.

Einer der großen Anwendungsbereiche für ML ist die Spracherkennung und -verarbeitung. Amazons Alexa zieht gerade in die Haushalte ein, Microsoft, Google, Facebook und IBM haben hier einen Großteil ihrer Forschungs- und Entwicklungsgelder investiert sowie spezialisierte Firmen zugekauft. Es lässt sich absehen, dass natürlichsprachige Kommunikation an der Kundenschnittstelle selbstverständlicher wird. Auch die Bedienung von digitalen Produkten und Enterprise-IT-Lösungen wird via Sprachbefehl möglich sein. Das hat sowohl Auswirkungen auf das Customer-Frontend als auch auf das IT-Backend.

Niedrige Einstiegshürden in Machine Learning

Da die großen Cloud-Anbieter ML-Services und -Produkte in ihr Leistungsportfolio aufgenommen haben, ist es für Anwender relativ einfach, einen Einstieg zu finden. Amazon Machine Learning, Microsoft Azure Machine Learning, IBM Bluemix und Google Machine Learning erlauben einen kostengünstigen Zugang zu entsprechenden Diensten über die Public Cloud. Anwender brauchen also keinen eigenen Supercomputer, kein Team von Statistikexperten und kein dediziertes Infrastruktur-Management mehr. Mit ein paar Kommandos über die APIs der großen Public-Cloud-Provider können sie loslegen.

Anwender brauchen vor allem Hilfe bei der Datenexploration.
Anwender brauchen vor allem Hilfe bei der Datenexploration.
Foto: Crisp Research, Kassel

 

Sie finden dort unterschiedliche Machine-Learning-Verfahren sowie Dienste und Tools wie etwa grafische Programmiermodelle und Storage-Dienste vor. Je mehr sie sich darauf einlassen, desto größer wird allerdings das Risiko eines Vendor-Lock-ins. Deshalb sollten sich Anwender vor dem Start Gedanken über ihre Strategie machen. IT-Dienstleister und Managed-Service-Provider können ebenso ML-Systeme und Infrastrukturen bereitstellen und betreiben, so dass Unabhängigkeit von den Public-Cloud-Providern und ihren SLAs ebenso möglich ist.

Verschiedene Spielarten der KI

Machine Learning, Deep Learning, Cognitive Computing – derzeit kursieren eine Reihe von KI-Begriffen, deren Abgrenzung voneinander nicht ganz einfach ist. Crisp Research wählt dafür die Dimensionen „Clarity of Purpose“ (Orientierung am Einsatzweck) und „Degree of Autonomy“ (Grad der Autonomie). ML-Systeme sind derzeit größtenteils auf Einsatzzwecke hin entwickelt und trainiert. Sie erkennen beispielsweise im Fertigungsprozess fehlerhafte Produkte im Rahmen einer Qualitätskontrolle. Ihre Aufgabe ist klar umrissen, es gibt keine Autonomie.

Deep-Learning-Systeme hingegen sind in der Lage, mittels Neuronaler Netze eigenständig zu lernen. Simulierte Neuronen werden in vielen Schichten übereinander modelliert und angeordnet. Jede Ebene des Netzwerks erfüllt dabei eigenständig bestimmte Aufgaben, etwa das Erkennen von Kanten. Diese Information wird eigenständig an die nächste Ebene weitergegeben und fließt dort in die Verarbeitung ein. Im Zusammenspiel mit großen Mengen an Trainingsdaten lernen solche Netzwerke, bestimmte Aufgaben zu erledigen – etwa das Identifizieren von Krebszellen in medizinischen Bildern.

Deep-Learning-Systeme arbeiten autonomer

Deep-Learning-Systeme arbeiten also deutlich autonomer als ML-Systeme, da die Neuronalen Netzwerke darauf trainiert werden, selbständig zu lernen und Entscheidungen zu treffen, die von außen nicht unbedingt nachvollziehbar sind.

Als dritte Spielart der KI gilt das Cognitive Computing, das insbesondere von IBM mit seiner Watson-Technologie propagiert wird. Solche Systeme zeichnen sich dadurch aus, dass sie in einer Assistenzfunktion oder gar als Ersatz des Menschen Aufgaben übernehmen und Entscheidungen treffen und dabei mit Ambiguität und Unschärfe umgehen können. Als Beispiele können das Schadensfall-Management in einer Versicherung dienen, eine Service-Hotline oder die Diagnostik im Krankenhaus.

Auch wenn hier bereits ein hohes Maß an Autonomie erreicht werden kann, ist der Weg zu echter Künstlicher Intelligenz mit autonomen kognitiven Fähigkeiten noch weit. Die Wissenschaft beschäftigt sich aber intensiv damit und streitet darüber, ob und wann dieses Ziel erreicht werden kann. Derweil sind Unternehmen gut beraten, sich mit den machbaren Use Cases zu beschäftigen, von denen es bereits eine Menge gibt.

Im Zuge des Digitalisierungstrends kommt in vielen Unternehmen Analytics auf die Tagesordnung – und damit auch Machine Learning und Deep Learning. Jetzt geht es darum, den Datenschatz zu heben.
  • Viele Unternehmen haben Data Lakes mit strukturierten und unstrukturierten Daten aufgebaut. Jetzt gilt es, etwas daraus zu machen
  • Einsatzgebiete für Machine Learning sind etwa Prozessverbesserungen sowie eine bessere Kundenansprache und ein möglichst effizienter Support
  • In vielen Branchen ist der Abstand zwischen Vorreitern und Nachzüglern riesig

Die Phantasien und Visionen rund um die digitale Zukunft kennen derzeit keine Grenzen. Vollautomatisierte Produktionsstraßen, autonome Verkehrssysteme, intelligente digitale Assistenten – es vergeht kaum ein Tag, an dem nicht neue Szenarien diskutiert werden. Dadurch fühlen sich viele Firmen unter Druck gesetzt. Sie arbeiten am „digitalen Unternehmen“ und entdecken ihre Daten als Grundlagen für neue Geschäftsmodelle und Services. So gewinnt Analytics an Bedeutung – und mit der Analytics-Strategie kommen KI und Machine Learning (ML) auf die Tagesordnung.

Aus diesen Gründen beschäftigen sich Anwender mit Machine Learning.
Aus diesen Gründen beschäftigen sich Anwender mit Machine Learning.
Foto: Crisp Research

 

IT- und Digitalisierungsentscheider vermuten ein enormes Potenzial hinter dem Thema Machine Learning. Eine Umfrage, die das Analystenhaus Crisp Research unterstützt von The unbelievable Machine Company und Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) auf den Weg gebracht hat, zeigt, dass nur drei Prozent der knapp 250 Befragten ML für einen Marketing-Hype halten. Ein Drittel bezeichnet ML-Verfahren in begrenzten Einsatzbereichen als sinnvoll, sogar 43 Prozent sind überzeugt davon, dass ML ein wichtiger Aspekt künftiger Big-Data- und Analytics-Strategien wird.

Wie die Initiatoren der Studie feststellen, ist das kein überraschendes Ergebnis. Die meisten Unternehmen haben im großen Stil in Big-Data-Infrastrukturen und eigene Data Lakes investiert, um ihre Unternehmensdaten zusammenzuführen und auswertbar zu machen. ML ermöglicht einen hohen Automationsgrad in der Datenanalyse und hilft somit, den verborgenen Schatz zu heben. Daten gelten als großes Asset, doch den Beweis dafür haben viele Firmen noch nicht gebracht. Technologien und Use Cases rund um Machine Learning versprechen Abhilfe.

Immenses Innovationspotenzial

Immerhin 16 Prozent der befragten sehen ML sogar als neue „Kerntechnologie eines vollständig digitalen Unternehmens“. Das Innovations- und Gestaltungspotenzial scheint also immens, wenngleich viele Probleme rund um Datenqualität, Governance, API-Management, Infrastruktur und vor allem Personal den Trend noch bremsen.

Rund 34 Prozent der Befragten beschäftigen sich mit ML, weil sie ihre internen Prozesse in der Produktion, Logistik oder im Qualitätsmanagement verbessern wollen. Sie erheben beispielsweise Daten im Produktionsablauf, um ihre Fertigung optimieren zu können. Fast ebenso viele wollen Initiativen rund um die Customer Experience vorantreiben – etwa in E-Commerce, Marketing oder im Bereich der Portale und Apps. Sie versprechen sich davon beispielsweise eine personalisierte Kundenansprache, um Produkte oder Dienste zielgerichteter an den Konsumenten bringen zu können. Mit 19 Prozent ist die Gruppe derer, die Wartungs- und Supportleistungen optimieren wollen (Predictive Maintenance), etwas kleiner. Hinzu kommen Betriebe, die sich grundsätzlich mit neuen Technologien beschäftigen (28 Prozent) oder durch Berater und Analysten auf das Thema aufmerksam geworden sind (27 Prozent).

Elementar für selbstfahrende Autos

Das Nutzungsverhalten von ML ist nicht nur zwischen, sondern auch innerhalb der Branchen sehr unterschiedlich ausgeprägt. In der Automobilbranche etwa gibt es große Abstände zwischen den Vorreitern und den Nachzüglern. Für die Entwicklung und Produktion selbstfahrender Autos sind Bild- und Videoanalyse in Echtzeit sowie statistische Verfahren und mathematische Modelle aus Machine Learning und Deep Learning weit verbreitet. Einige Verfahren werden auch dazu verwendet, Fabrikationsfehler in der Fertigung zu erkennen.

Der Anteil der Innovatoren, die ML bereits in weiten Teilen einsetzen, ist in der Automobilbranche mit rund 20 Prozent am größten. Demgegenüber stehen allerdings 60 Prozent, die sich zwar mit ML beschäftigen, aber noch in der Evaluierungs- und Planungsphase stecken. So zeigt sich, dass in der Autobranche einige Leuchttürme das Bild prägen, von einer flächendeckenden Adaption aber nicht die Rede sein kann.

Status der Branchen bei der Einführung von Machine-Learning-Technologien
Status der Branchen bei der Einführung von Machine-Learning-Technologien
Foto: Crisp Research

 

Auch die Maschinen- und Anlagenbauer stecken noch zur Hälfte (53 Prozent) in der Evaluierungs- und Planungsphase. Ein knappe Drittel nutzt ML in ausgewählten Anwendungsbereichen produktiv und 18 Prozent bauen derzeit Prototypen. Weiter sind die Handels- und Konsumgüterfirmen, die zu 44 Prozent dabei sind, ML in ersten Projekten und Prototypen zu erproben. Das überrascht insofern nicht, als diese Firmen in der Regel gute gepflegte Datenbestände haben und viel Erfahrung mit Business Intelligence und Data Warehouses besitzen. Gelingt es ihnen, Preisstrategien, Warenverfügbarkeiten oder Marketing-Kampagnen messbar zu verbessern, wird ML als willkommenes Innovationsinstrument bestehender Big-Data-Strategien gesehen.

Gleiches gilt für die IT-, TK- und Medienbranche: Dort kommen ML-Verfahren etwa zum Ausspielen von Online-Werbung, Berechnen von Kaufwahrscheinlichkeiten (Conversion Rates) oder dem Personalisieren von Webinhalten und Einkaufsempfehlungen längst zum Einsatz. Bei den professionellen Dienstleistern spielen das Messen und Verbessern der Kundenbindung, der Dienstleistungsqualität und der Termintreue eine wichtige Rolle, sind das doch die wettbewerbsdifferenzierenden Faktoren.

IT-Abteilungen sind zuständig

Knapp 60 Prozent der befragten Entscheider gaben an, ihre IT-Abteilung sei federführend zuständig, wenn es um ML-Projekte gehe. Den Studienautoren von Crisp zufolge liegt das an der hohen technologischen Komplexität des Themas. Neben mathematischen und statistischen Skills ist demnach auch eine große Bandbreite an Fertigkeiten im Bereich der IT-Operations gefragt. Hinzu kommen die BI- und Analytics-Fähigkeiten, die hier oftmals angesiedelt sind.

Doch auch Fachabteilungen wie Logistik und Produktion sind mit im Boot, weil sie in der Regel die Prozessverbesserungs- und IoT-Szenarien vorantreiben. Die großen Mengen an Maschinen-, Produktions-, Logistik- sowie sonstigen Sensor- und Log-Daten müssen auf Muster und Korrelationen hin abgefragt werden – eine Aufgabe für Fertigung und Logistik.

Und schließlich sind auch Kundenservice und -support führende Instanzen, wenn es um die Einführung von ML geht. Sie wollen die personalisierte Kundeninteraktion vorantreiben und sammeln in ihren Bereichen die Text-, Bild- und Audiodaten, die das Potenzial für Analysen bieten. Interessant an der Umfrage ist indes, dass Marketing und Kommunikation von ML oft nichts wissen wollen, obwohl sie reichlich Einsatzszenarien hätten. Sie könnten etwa Kundenbeziehungen auswerten und die Kundenbindung verbessern, automatisiertes Medien-Monitoring vorantreiben oder das Social Web mit Sentiment-Analysen bearbeiten. All das findet aber relativ selten statt, was Crisp Research mit der traditionell „passiven, technologieagnostischen Rolle“ dieser Abteilungen begründet. Marketing- und Kommunikationsabteilungen treten demnach meist als „Anforderer“ und interne Kunden auf, nicht als diejenigen, die tiefer in Technologien einsteigen.

Welche Machine-Learning-Funktionen benötigen Unternehmen wofür? Und wann kommen welche Lernstile, Frameworks, Programmiersprachen und Algorithmen zum Einsatz? Meistens beginnen Firmen mit Bildanalyse und -erkennung.
 
  • Bild- und Spracherkennung sind die wichtigsten Anwendungen im Bereich Machine Learning
  • Geht es um die Plattformauswahl, wird die Public Cloud zunehmend wichtig
  • Grafikprozessoren setzen sich im Bereich Deep Learning durch

Wie die Analysten von Crisp Research im Rahmen einer umfassenden Studie gemeinsam mit The unbelievable Machine Company und Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) schreiben, gibt die Mehrheit der rund 250 befragten IT-Entscheider an, mit der Bildanalyse und -erkennung in das komplexe Thema Machine Learning (ML) einzusteigen. So werden beispielsweise in Industrieunternehmen Fremdkörper auf Förderbändern identifiziert, fehlerhafte Einfärbungen von Produkten entdeckt oder von autonomen Fahrzeugen Straßenschilder erkannt.

Diese Machine-Learning-Funktionen nutzen die Anwender.
Diese Machine-Learning-Funktionen nutzen die Anwender.
Foto: Crisp Research, Kassel

 

Wichtig sind ML-Verfahren auch zur Sprachsteuerung und -erkennung (42 Prozent). Eng damit verbunden sind Natural Language Processing und Textanalyse – also das semantische Erfassen von Sprachinhalten und Texten. Heute beschäftigen sich 35 Prozent der Unternehmen damit, Tendenz steigend. Hintergrund ist, dass konversationsbasierte Benutzerschnittstellen derzeit einen Aufschwung erleben.

Chatbots, Gesichtserkennung, Sentiment-Analyse und mehr

Machine Learning kommt außerdem bei rund einem Drittel der Befragten im Zusammenhang mit der Entwicklung digitaler Assistenten, sogenannter Bots zum Einsatz. Weitere Einsatzgebiete sind Gesichtserkennung, die Sentiment-Analyse und besondere Verfahren der Mustererkennung – oft in einem unternehmens- oder branchenspezifischen Kontext. Die Spracherkennung ist vor allem für Marketingentscheider interessant, da digitale Assistenten für die Automatisierung von Call-Center-Abläufen oder die Echtzeit-Kommunikation mit dem Kunden an Bedeutung gewinnen. Auch die Personalisierung von Produktempfehlungen ist ein wichtiger Use-Case.

Ein Blick auf die Nutzungsszenarien von ML-Technologien zeigt, dass Bildanalyse und -erkennung heute weit vorne rangieren, doch die Zukunft gehört eher der Sprachsteuerung und – erkennung, ebenso der Textanalyse und Natural Language Processing (NLP). Insgesamt werden ML-Technologien auf breiter Front an Bedeutung gewinne, auch etwa im Bereich der Videoanalyse, der Sentiment-Analyse, der Gesichtserkennung sowie beim Einsatz intelligenter Bots.

Schaut man auf die einzelnen Unternehmensbereiche, so wird deutlich, dass sich die für Customer Experience Management zuständigen Einheiten ML-Technologien vor allem im Bereich der Kundensegmentierung, der personalisierten Produktempfehlung, der Spracherkennung und teilweise auch der Gesichtserkennung bedienen. IT-Abteilungen treiben damit E-Mail-Klassifizierung, Spam-Erkennung, Diagnosesysteme und das Klassifizieren von Dokumenten voran. Die Produktion ist vor allem auf Prozessverbesserungen aus, während Kundendienst und Support ihre Diagnoseysteme vorantreiben und an automatisierten Lösungsempfehlungen arbeiten. Auch Call-Center-Gespräche werden bereits analysiert, teilweise auch mit der Absicht, positive und negative Äußerungen der Kunden zu erkennen (Sentiment-Analyse).

Auch die Bereiche Finance und Human Resources sowie das Management generell nutzen vermehrt ML-Technologien. Wichtigstes Einsatzgebiet sind hier das Risiko-Management sowie Forecasting und Prognosen. Im HR-Bereich werden auch Trainingsempfehlungen automatisiert erstellt, Lebensläufe überprüft und das Talent-Management vorangetrieben. Im zentralen Einkauf und dem Management der Lieferanten ist die Digital Supply-Chain-Verbesserung das Kernaufgabengebiet von ML-technologie. Vermehrt werden hier auch Demand Forecastings ermittelt, Risiken im Zusammenhang mit bestimmten Lieferanten analysiert und generell Entscheidungsprozesse digital unterstützt.

Machine-Learning-Plattformen und -Produkte

Geht es um die Auswahl von Plattformen und -Produkten, spielen Lösungen aus der Public Cloud eine zunehmend wichtige Rolle (Machine Learning as a Service). Um Komplexität aus dem Wege zu gehen und weil die großen Cloud-Provider auch die maßgeblichen Innovatoren auf diesem Gebiet sind, entscheiden sich viele Anwender für diese Cloud-Lösungen. Während 38,1 der Befragten Lösungen aus der Public-Cloud bevorzugen, wählen 19,1 Prozent proprietäre Lösungen ausgesuchter Anbieter und 18,5 Prozent Open-Source-Alternativen. Der Rest verfolgt entweder eine hybride Strategie (15,5 Prozent) oder hat sich noch keine Meinung dazu gebildet (8,8 Prozent).

Welche Cloud-Angebote zu Machine Learning sind im Einsatz?
Welche Cloud-Angebote zu Machine Learning sind im Einsatz?
Foto: Crisp Research

 

Unter den Cloud-basierten Lösungen hat AWS den höchsten Bekanntheitsgrad: 71 Prozent der Entscheider geben an, dass ihnen Amazon in diesem Kontext bekannt sei. Auch Microsoft, Google und IBM sind den Umfrageteilnehmern zu mehr als zwei Drittel im ML-Umfeld ein Begriff. Interessanterweise nutzen aber nur 17 Prozent der befragten die AWS-Cloud-Dienste im Kontext der Evaluierung, Projektierung sowie im produktiven Betrieb für ML. Jeweils rund ein Drittel der Befragten beschäftigt sich indes mit IBM Watson, Microsoft Azure oder der Google Cloud Machine Learning Plattform.

Die Analysten nehmen an, dass dies viel mit den Marketing-Anstrengungen der Hersteller zu tun hat. IBM und Microsoft investieren demnach massiv in ihre Cognitive- beziehungsweise KI-Strategie. Beide haben einen starken Mittelstands- und Großkundenvertrieb und ein großes Partnernetzwerk. Google indes verdanke seine Position dem Image als gewaltige daten- und Analytics-Maschine, die den Markt durch viele Innovationen treibe – etwa Tensorflow, viele ML-APIs und auch eigene Hardware. Schließlich zähle aber auch HP Enterprise mit „Haven on Demand“ zu den relevanten ML-Playern und werde von 14 Prozent der Befragten genutzt.

Deep Learning ist schwieriger

Bereits in den 40er Jahren des vergangenen Jahrhunderts wurden die ersten neuronalen Lernregeln beschrieben. Die wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse wuchsen rasch, die Anzahl der Algorithmen ebenfalls – doch es fehlte an der notwendigen Rechenleistung, um „Rückgekoppelte Neuronale Netzwerke“ in der Fläche zu nutzen. Heute sind diese unter dem Begriff Deep Learning in aller Munde, sie könnten Bereiche wie Handschriftenerkennung, Spracherkennung, maschinelles Übersetzen oder auch automatische Bildbeschreibungen revolutionieren.

Hintergrund ist, dass eine Präzision erreicht werden kann, die menschliche Fähigkeiten im jeweiligen Zusammenhang weit übertrifft. Dabei spannen neuronale Netze Ebenen von unterschiedlicher Komplexität auf. Je mehr Daten so einem neuronalen Netz zum Trainieren zur Verfügung stehen, desto besser werden die Ergebnisse beziehungsweise die trainierte Künstliche Intelligenz. So lernt ein System beispielsweise, wie anhand einer Computer-Tomografie Krebsgeschwüre diagnostiziert werden können, die das menschliche Auge nicht so einfach sieht.

Grafikprozessoren bieten die nötige Performance

Im Bereich des Deep Learning haben sich hardwareseitig Grafikprozessoren (GPUs) wegen ihre hohen Performance als besonders geeignet erwiesen. Förderlich waren außerdem die schier unbegrenzte Rechenpower, die sich aus den Public-Cloud-Ressourcen ergibt, sowie die Verfügbarkeit großer Mengen von Daten aus den verschiedensten Anwendungsgebieten. Unternehmen nutzen bereits Deep-learning-Algorithmen, im bestimmte Merkmal in Bildern aufzuspüren, Videoanalysen vorzunehmen, Umweltparameter beim autonomen Fahren zu verarbeiten oder automatische Sprachverarbeitung voranzutreiben.

In der Crisp-Umfrage geben 48 Prozent der Teilnehmer an, von Deep Learning zumindest gehört oder gelesen zu haben. Weitere 21 Prozent sind bereits in einer konkreten Evaluationsphase. Sie haben Erkenntnisse gesammelt und arbeiten nun an konkreten Prototypen, um ihr gewünschtes Einsatzszenario zu validieren. Weitere fünf Prozent sind sogar noch einen Schritt weiter und haben bereits Deep Learning im Einsatz. Vor allem Startups und Konzerne – auch hier wieder vor allem aus dem Automotive-Sektor – haben hier die Nase vorn.

Unter den Frameworks und Bibliotheken, die für das Implementieren von Deep-Learning-Algorithmen eine Rolle spielen, spielen unter anderem Microsofts „Computational Network Toolkit“ (CNTK) sowie jede Menge Public-Cloud- und Open-Source-Lösungen eine Rolle (eine Übersicht gibt es hier http://deeplearning.net/software_links/).

Machine Learning macht Analysen besser

Zuerst analysierten lernende Maschinen das Nutzerverhalten in Suchmaschinen, um passende Werbung anzuzeigen. Heute optimieren sie Verkehrsflüsse, die Stahlherstellung und planen die Flugzeugwartung. Experten von Allianz, Trip Advisor, GfK und Boeing erklären, wie ihnen Machine Learning hilft.

http://www.computerwoche.de/a/machine-learning-soll-analysen-besser-machen,3217540

Bei der Münchener Allianz Versicherung ist Andreas Braun, Head of Global Data and Analytics, zufrieden mit den Ergebnissen seiner Experimente mit den neuen Analytics-Ansätzen aus der künstlichen Intelligenz. „Wir haben bei uns ein Ökosystem aus verschiedenen Bestandteilen im Einsatz. Big-Data-Technologien und Machine Learning bieten uns bessere Möglichkeiten, mit unseren Daten umzugehen, und liefern konsistent gute Ergebnisse“, sagte er auf der Konferenz der Yandex Data Factory zum Thema „Machine Learning and Big Data“ in Berlin. Zum Beispiel im Gebäude-Management: Zusammen mit Studenten der TU München hat die Versicherung eine App entwickelt, die eine Vielzahl von Gegenständen über Sensoren vernetzt.

„Das System kalibriert sich selbst, lernt normales Verhalten im Haus, und kann so einen Einbruch von anderen ungewöhnlichen, aber unkritischen Vorfällen unterscheiden.“ Außerdem wollen die Experten die Bilderkennung weiter verbessern. Eingereichte Fotos sollen bei Versicherungsschäden automatisch durch Maschinen beurteilt werden.

Die Experten, die der russische Suchmaschinen-Anbieter Yandex nach Berlin eingeladen hatte, tauschten sich unter dem Motto „Business Challenges“ auch über die Schwierigkeiten und Risiken rund um Machine Learning aus. Jeff Palmucci, Director of Machine Intelligence beim Reiseportal Trip Advisor, schilderte, wie sein Unternehmen maschinelles Lernen in die Geschäftsprozesse implementiert. So hilft die Technik, Restaurants und Hotels automatisiert mit passenden Tags wie „romantisch“ oder „charmant“ zu versehen, damit Suchende schnell das richtige Angebot finden. Auch um Betrug etwa bei den Bewertungen rasch zu erkennen, setzt das Portal Machine Learning ein.

Menschliches Verhalten vorhersagen

Machine Learning stellt Unternehmen vor vielfältige Herausforderungen. Nicht alle Branchen eignen sich gleich gut, erklärte Jane Zavalishina, CEO der Yandex Data Factory: „Es geht vor allem darum, menschliches Verhalten vorherzusagen.“ Bei Ergebnissen, die auf Machine Learning basieren, könne man aber durch die hohe Komplexität und die großen Datenmengen nie genau nachvollziehen, wie sie zustande gekommen sind. In der Praxis müsse man mit den Empfehlungen experimentieren, um herauszufinden, ob sie der bisherigen Vorgehensweise überlegen sind. Das gehe aus ethischen und praktischen Gründen allerdings nicht immer.

Jane Zavalishina CEO, Yandex Data Factory „Viele Unternehmen befinden sich aber noch an dem Punkt, an dem sie versuchen, Big Data Analytics überhaupt zu verstehen.“
Jane Zavalishina CEO, Yandex Data Factory „Viele Unternehmen befinden sich aber noch an dem Punkt, an dem sie versuchen, Big Data Analytics überhaupt zu verstehen.“
Foto: Yandex

In Echtzeit Web-Inhalte zu personalisieren oder Vorhersagen zu treffen, ist für die russische Suchmaschine Yandex nichts Neues. Das Wissen des Konzerns, das aus der Suchtechnik und dem kontextuellen Einspielen passender Werbung entstanden ist, und die dafür entwickelten Algorithmen stellt sie seit 2014 auch extern zur Verfügung. Zunächst probierte das Tochterunternehmen Yandex Data Factory, das Firmensitze in Moskau und Amsterdam unterhält, die Techniken maschinellen Lernens in der Wissenschaft aus – zum Beispiel, um Big-Data-Probleme des europäischen Kernforschungszentrums CERN zu lösen.

Inzwischen besprechen die Datenexperten mit Firmen, die viele Kunden und große Datenmengen haben, wie sich deren Services, Prozesse und Produkte ver­bessern lassen. „Die Anwendungsmöglichkeiten für maschinelles Lernen in Unternehmen sind fast unbegrenzt“, sagte Zavalishina. „Viele Unternehmen befin­den sich aber noch an dem Punkt, an dem sie versuchen, Big Data Analytics überhaupt zu verstehen.“

Eine der ersten Firmen, die Wissen und Technologie von Yandex nutzte, war die russische Straßenverwaltungsbehörde Rosavtodor, die Vorhersagen zur Verkehrsdichte und zu Unfällen benötigte. Im Stahlwerk Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works optimieren heute Algorithmen die Stahlproduktion. Zu wenige Zusätze ergeben eine schlechte Qualität, zu viele treiben die Kosten in die Höhe. Bisher nutzten die Stahlkocher für ihre Mischungsvorhersagen komplizierte Modelle. Yandex Data Factory verwendete zur Optimierung historische Daten aus den zurückliegenden zehn Jahren. Vergleichsweise einfach scheint es dagegen, mit Machine Learning Websites zu optimieren und Online-Werbung auszusenden.

Business ist datengetrieben

„Wir sind ein komplett datengetriebenes Business“, sagt Norbert Wirth, Global Head of Data and Science beim Marktforschungsinstitut GfK, „Machine-Learning-Algorithmen sind für uns ein Werkzeug im Kanon mit anderen, das aber für die Vorhersage und für Klassifizierungsprobleme zunehmend wichtiger wird.“ GfK nutzt es derzeit vor allem für die Analyse von Social-Media-Daten und um Marktanteile und Marktperformance vorherzusagen.

„Wir setzen es ein, wenn nicht die Frage nach dem Warum entscheidend ist, sondern die Qualität der Vorhersage“, so Wirth. Sind Aussagen über eine Marke tendenziell eher positiv oder negativ? Und um welche Themen geht es? Bei kleineren Datenbeständen könne man das noch selbst herausfinden, wird es jedoch umfangreicher, seien die Algorithmen „extrem spannend – und sie werden immer leistungsfähiger“. Das sei kein Hype, sagt der Marktforscher, „Machine Learning wird an Bedeutung zunehmen. Mit wachsender Computerpower kann man damit jetzt wirklich arbeiten.“ Die eine Sache sei ein toller Algorithmus, die andere, ob man die dafür nötigen Maschinen auch am Start habe.

In Zukunft werden Analysten laut Wirth zusätzliche Daten verwenden, um Algorithmen zu trainieren und die Modelle leistungsfähiger zu machen. „Es geht in die Richtung, im Analyseprozess mit mehreren Datenquellen zu arbeiten. Natürlich mit solchen, die auch legal genutzt werden dürfen.“ Data Privacy sei ein sehr wichtiges Thema rund um Machine Learning – aber auch die Stabilität und die Qualität der Daten.

Der Flugzeughersteller Boeing nutzt Machine Learning, um seine Services und die interne Produktion zu verbessern, berichtete Sergey Kravchenko, President Russia and CIS von Boeing. Das Flugzeug 787 verfüge über mehr als zehntausend mit dem Internet verbundene Sensoren, die den Mechanikern am Boden schon während des Fluges melden, wenn zum Beispiel eine Lampe oder eine Pumpe ausgetauscht werden muss. So können Fluggesellschaften ihre Wartungskosten reduzieren und im Betrieb effizienter arbeiten.

Boeing arbeitet mit Big Data und Machine Learning, um den Fluggesellschaften mit den während eines Flugs gesammelten Daten zu helfen, Treibstoffkosten zu senken und die Piloten bei schlechtem Wetter zu unterstützen. Nun werden die Daten auch in der Produktion verwendet, um etwa für bestimmte Prozesse die besten Ingenieure zu finden. Daten der Personalabteilung würden genutzt, um zu verstehen, wie die Lebensdauer und die Qualität der Flugzeuge mit dem Training und der Mischung der Menschen im Produktionsteam korrelieren. Gibt es bei Prozessen, die aufwendige Nacharbeiten erfordern, Zusammenhänge mit den bereitgestellten Werkzeugen oder mit dem Team? Kravchenko will mit Big-Data-Analysen den gesamten Zyklus von Design, Produktion und Wartung verbessern.

Ein neues Big-Data-Projekt ist die Flight Training Academy, die 2016 eröffnet werden soll. Hier werden Daten der drei Flugsimulatoren gesammelt und ausgewertet, um die Gestaltung des Cockpits und das Design der Flugzeug­software zu verbessern. Kravchenko will seinen russischen Kunden auch anbieten, in Zukunft Daten auszutauschen und sie gemeinsam auszuwerten.

Experten müssen zusammenpassen

Die Fertigungsindustrie stehe bei der Anwendung von Machine Learning – verglichen etwa mit Telcos und dem Handel – noch am Anfang. Sie werde aber schnell von ihnen und auch von Firmen wie Amazon und Google, lernen. Wer Erfolg haben wolle, müsse die besten Flugzeug- und IT-Experten zusammenbringen. Das Problem: „Die kommen von verschiedenen Planeten.“

Die Zusammenarbeit kann dennoch gelingen – wenn sich alle auf eine gemeinsame Terminologie einigen. „Die Datenexperten müssen etwas mehr von Flugzeugen und Airlines verstehen und die Flugzeugspezialisten mehr über Data Analytics lernen. Sie müssen sich die Werkzeuge teilen, sich gegenseitig vertrauen und ein gemeinsames Team aufbauen“, sagt der Flugzeugbauer. Ein weiteres Problem sei die Relevanz der Daten. „Hier muss die Industrie ihre riesigen Datenmengen anschauen und entscheiden, welche Daten wirklich wichtig sind, um bestimmte Probleme zu lösen. Das ist nicht einfach, dafür brauchen wir Zeit, Trial and Error, und wir müssen von anderen Branchen lernen.“ Die richtige Auswahl der Daten und die Interpretation der Ergebnisse seien dabei wichtiger als der Algorithmus selbst.